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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    14,416

    Default T-posts: heavy duty or light duty?

    I am permanentizing some sections of my temporary Horseguard fence and I find myself having to buy some new T-posts to complete the project.

    In the past, I have been adamant about always using the heavy duty T-posts around horses. I already know I like taller ones; my feeling is that a tall post with a cap is much safer than a low post, because the extra height makes it much harder for a horse to contact the top.

    However, I can't help but notice that the lightweight T-posts are far less expensive.

    I'm not planning to fully sleeve these, but for those of you who do use the Horseguard sleeves, do you use the light duty or heavy duty T-posts? The light duty with the sleeves seems kind of plausible to me, and that might be comparable in cost to the heavy duty unsleeved.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    31,404

    Default

    it's not so much the horses that would do it in, but equipment you run near it.

    My old house had a very bend fence post...the previous owner had hit it with his car....it was a heavy duty T post, the kind you have not seen in stored for the last 40 years....
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 2012
    Location
    La La Land
    Posts
    478

    Default

    Heavy duty vote here. I bend the light duty ones into all sorts of shapes just pounding them in. Then you throw them out, then you go back buy heavy duty, spend twice as much, swear alot more. And so on... Good luck and a happy project to you.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2004
    Location
    Piedmont Triad, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,233

    Default

    Are you speaking of the light posts made from sheet metal, bent into a "U" ? If so... You'll waste your time and money trying to use it for horses. Those posts are meant for keeping bunnies and dogs out of gardens, not a 1000 pounds of hungry for the green on the other side of the fence.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
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    Default

    No, they're definitely T posts, and called light duty ones. They weigh about half what the heavy duty ones do, though. Difference is $3.50 a post versus $8 a post, I'm afraid.

    Sounds like the consensus is to stick with the heavy duty ones. I think I'm good with that. I'm counting on the electricity to keep the horses in, but it just seems better to have the more hefty post.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2013
    Location
    Neither Here nor There
    Posts
    33

    Default

    I've always been able to get pressure treated wood posts at either Lowe's or Home Depot/similar for less than the cost of a heavy duty T-post... I believe the last time I bought them they were on sale for $2.98 a piece, but regularly only around $4. Much sturdier, prettier, and in my case economical.
    "Sit back and prepare to be pissed off!"

    Eventer, Ballerina, Dancer, Model, and Waitress Extraordinaire (cos a girls gotta eat!).



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
    Posts
    14,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mickie So Fine View Post
    I've always been able to get pressure treated wood posts at either Lowe's or Home Depot/similar for less than the cost of a heavy duty T-post... I believe the last time I bought them they were on sale for $2.98 a piece, but regularly only around $4. Much sturdier, prettier, and in my case economical.
    We make them here... but you can't touch wood posts for less than $8 locally. Heck if I understand why. They're also more difficult to install and not movable once you do. I use wood for the non-electric installs, though.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2004
    Location
    Elkton
    Posts
    4,419

    Default

    I used the plastic step in posts for sectioning off a paddock within a field (so there was no chance of them actually getting loose) and even with 3 rows of electric tape one of my genius horses ran through it and snapped almost every post.

    boo.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2004
    Posts
    2,796

    Default

    If it helps...I started out with the light duty ones because they were cheaper. Over time I've had to replace them all with the heavy duty ones. They're just not strong enough, they bend with any sort of pressure.
    "You can't blame other people. You can't always say what happened wasn't my fault, and you know what? Even if you have an excuse, shut up. "Bruce Davidson Sr.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2011
    Posts
    516

    Default

    I've also noticed that the light-weight variety tend to deteriorate from rust and exposure below and at ground level because they are often made from stamped metal. That really means they are not necessarily "cheaper" when you consider more frequent replacement costs...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
    Location
    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chism View Post
    If it helps...I started out with the light duty ones because they were cheaper. Over time I've had to replace them all with the heavy duty ones. They're just not strong enough, they bend with any sort of pressure.
    Thanks, that does help!
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,392

    Default

    i have 800ft of interior fencelines to put in this spring, and over the winter I just kept searching craigslist for used Tposts. I got about 45 posts from one guy for $2 each, and another 50 from another for $1.50 each. SCORE! They're old and have some surface rust but are *really* heavy duty (and of course I picked through the stacks to only get straight ones).
    So if you have the luxury of time, start searching now (or put a want ad out there) and I bet you can accumulate a good stash of posts without having to buy new.
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion


    1 members found this post helpful.

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