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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2006
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    Collingwood,ON
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    Default What are the walls of your barn lined with?

    I am building a new barn and am trying to decide what the back walls of the stalls will be lined with. The stall fronts and dividers will be tongue and groove ash, but that will be very expensive if I want to line the back walls in the same material. I have thought of just using plywood, but I think that looks a bit cheap. Any other ideas on what type of lumber to use on the back walls that will look nice, be safe and not break the bank?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2003
    Location
    Windward Farm, Washougal, WA- our work in progress, our money pit, our home!
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    6,888

    Default

    I used plywood, stained, because the former owner of our farmette left a lovely stack of 3/4" marine grade plywood behind for our use (yay!). I'd think that fir or pine would be fine, especially if you used T and G, and perhaps stained it or varnished it to match the ash. Whatever you use will get chewed, pooped on (sometimes explosively), kicked and generally beaten up, so affordable and strong and easily removed/replaced would be ideal. You might consider a treated 2x6 as the bottom board, to extend the life.
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!


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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2008
    Location
    Virginia
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    1,354

    Default

    We used T&G for all of our walls - a bit more expensive but well worth it. For the back and end stall sides, we saved a bit by using T&G up to 4'6 and then a sheet of T1-11 the rest of the way up. We did the wall along the aisle way across from the stalls the same way so it all ties in pretty nicely.

    We had a sudden bad storm roll through on Saturday which stirred everyone up a bit - one horse gave a few good kicks to his wall and both he and the wall held up great! If it had been plywood, probably not so well.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
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    40,850

    Default

    We have metal barns, so to line the walls where horses will be against the metal, we screwed on 3/4" exterior grade OSB/plywood and primed and painted it.
    It is still like new almost a decade later.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2003
    Location
    Cocoa, Fla
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    4,124

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Forte View Post
    I am building a new barn and am trying to decide what the back walls of the stalls will be lined with. The stall fronts and dividers will be tongue and groove ash, but that will be very expensive if I want to line the back walls in the same material. I have thought of just using plywood, but I think that looks a bit cheap. Any other ideas on what type of lumber to use on the back walls that will look nice, be safe and not break the bank?
    One barn used plywood, ohter barn we were located close to a lumber yard - so when we purchased and hauled lumber from there it was relatively inexpensive. I stained and polyurethaned all the wood for the stalls - it looked REALLY nice when I was done.
    Sandy in Fla.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
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    4,995

    Default

    Plywood can look pretty nice -- there are different grades so some look better than others, with corresponding prices. Long as it is thick enough it can't be kicked through, I'm fine with that.

    Our barn is all tongue and groove on the stalls -- I'm not sure what the wood is, actually. Fir or pine seems right for here. The stall fronts and wash rack are the really nice "clear" decking type that is really smooth and free of blemishes, but costs considerably more than the "construction grade" (I believe they call it) wood that is used on the interiors of the stalls. That latter stuff has more knots and blemishes, but long as it is relatively smooth and safe, I'm happy with it. The colors of the wood when new didn't totally match, but with time and dirt/poo doing a nice camouflage job, it is hard to see the difference now.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2003
    Location
    canada
    Posts
    1,281

    Default

    We used spruce 2x6x8 lumber run vertically, not T&G. It was way cheaper than what we did our stall fronts with (recycled plastic lumber), but doesn't look as good. I made it look better by buying a roll of very thin rubber from a rubber supplier and screwing this onto the wall. It looks amazing, is super easy to clean and is safer for the horses. The rubber was 6' high and our lumber was 8 so I just stained that top two feet of the cheap lumber myself and it looks great! The rubber is actually the top sheet for the softstall stall matress system. It was great that they cut it in one long roll, so there are no vertical seams as you go along the wall behind the stalls. You could easily do this over plywood too. It wasn't nearly as expensive as nice lumber and is more durable/practical.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
    Location
    Vermont
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    5,057

    Default

    Plywood, and it looks nice and uniform.

    I could've painted it, but I didn't. I was too lazy by the time we finished the barn itself!
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
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    14,725

    Default

    6ft high 2' x 6" yellow pine T&G
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Posts
    124

    Post

    Not to hijack the thread but this question just came up for me as well. We have a lot of tongue and groove, yellow pine that we picked up cheap. It is not treated/finished. Has anyone used this and stained/ polyurethaned soft pine for stall liners? Does it hold up? Will the polyurethane hurt the horses if they can get to it to chew on it? Thanks.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2003
    Location
    Wet and Windy Washington
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    Anyone willing to post photo's? I'm hoping to build my barn this year and want to see what folks are doing
    I have horse to sell to you. Horse good for riding. Can pull cart. Horse good size. Eats carrots and apples. Likes attention. Move head to music. No like opera! You like you buy.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by JackSprats Mom View Post
    Anyone willing to post photo's? I'm hoping to build my barn this year and want to see what folks are doing
    Ok, this wall on the background was put up and painted many years ago and will be repainted some time this year, maybe:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2003
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    Wet and Windy Washington
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    So thats plywood? thanks!
    I have horse to sell to you. Horse good for riding. Can pull cart. Horse good size. Eats carrots and apples. Likes attention. Move head to music. No like opera! You like you buy.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JackSprats Mom View Post
    So thats plywood? thanks!
    Yes, comes in standard 4' x 8' sheets and different widths.
    For horses, get the 3/4", any less they may kick thru.
    You can see we had to cut the end sheet to fit there and we covered the edge with metal trim vertically.

    We made the metal wall with purlins that fit that size plywood sheets, so the top and bottom was even with the purlins, so no room for birds or wasps to nest in there.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2001
    Location
    Catharpin, Virginia
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    6,687

    Default

    2x6 oak T&G. I have a Morton.

    I'd recommend putting 2 metal braces about 3' apart on the dividers. It doesn't take much of a kick to unseat the T&G.
    Last edited by sid; Mar. 19, 2013 at 11:24 PM. Reason: typos



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec. 25, 2007
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    1,401

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Forte View Post
    I am building a new barn and am trying to decide what the back walls of the stalls will be lined with. The stall fronts and dividers will be tongue and groove ash, but that will be very expensive if I want to line the back walls in the same material. I have thought of just using plywood, but I think that looks a bit cheap. Any other ideas on what type of lumber to use on the back walls that will look nice, be safe and not break the bank?
    2" thick white oak boards.

    Get the mill to stain it with something bug proof.

    40 years old and no horse can break it.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Equibrit View Post
    6ft high 2' x 6" yellow pine T&G
    Same here. We did ours horizontally.

    From a dust/dirt perspective, plywood would be better, no grooves for the junk to catch in. You can avoid that with T&G by putting the flat side in but that defeats most of the aesthetics LOL

    And ditto on the brace if you don't have a support post somewhere in the middle to which the boards are nailed. I have 3 stalls in a row, and the shared walls both have a metal brace running up them.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET


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  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2001
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    Catharpin, Virginia
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    Default

    Yes, forgot to say on my reply...all planks were set horizontally as well.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
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    Pacific Northwest
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    Default Pictures

    Here's what we did in the wash rack area, with the really nice t&g wood. Same stuff is inserted vertically in the stall fronts.
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  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
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    Pacific Northwest
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    Default

    Then the stalls are lined with the "cheap"(er) construction grade wood. Bad photo, I think from my dumb-phone, as opposed to a smartphone! And the bedding isn't all in yet, as we'd just brought this horse home, so I'm sure the mats got laid about 10 minutes before he arrived..that's just the way things go around here!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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