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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 18, 2013
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    1

    Default Paddling and Hunter Breeding In Hand Classes

    I've got a lovely Holsteiner/SelleFrancais filly -2 years old ...that I want to show on the line in some Hunter breeding classes...she's beautiful, correct,lovely mover-only thing is that she paddles slightly with the left front I'm not worried about it in the grand scheme of things...but how much will that count against her in Hunter Breeding in hand classes??



  2. #2

    Default

    I would think it would definitely move her down in the line unless the others in the class have conformation defects.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    7,559

    Default

    It probably will dock her placings in hand but IME it will not be a problem at all once she is going over fences and on the flat. Lots of top hunters paddle a little. I would be inclined to save that money now and spend it on more shows next year or the year after, in the baby or pre-greens. My 3 year old has a little paddle too, so that's what I did with him. Actually, at 3 he has mostly grown out of it, so it looks like it will be a complete nonissue under saddle.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2004
    Location
    Virginia. We Do Ponies!
    Posts
    11,962

    Default

    It should affect her placement because it's considered a way of moving fault. Judges have you walk straight towards them and trot away from them for a reason.....

    That being said, a good farrier can help you...
    Randee Beckman ~Otteridge Farm, LLC (http://on.fb.me/1iJEqvR)~ Marketing Manager - The Clothes Horse & Jennifer Oliver, Equine Insurance Specialist



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    36,091

    Default

    A good farrier should ONLY be helping if it's the trim causing the deviation.

    Never, every try to "fix" this by altering what is correct for that horse's leg. Doing so is very likely to lead to soundness problems down the road.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET


    7 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2002
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    4,647

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    A good farrier should ONLY be helping if it's the trim causing the deviation.

    Never, every try to "fix" this by altering what is correct for that horse's leg. Doing so is very likely to lead to soundness problems down the road.
    Agree 110%
    www.DaventryEquestrian.com
    Home of Oldenburg & RPSI approved pony stallions Daventry's Power Play & Goldhills Brandysnap
    Also home to Daventry Equine Appraisals www.EquineAppraisers.com


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2005
    Location
    Floral City , Fl.
    Posts
    4,250

    Default

    Daventry and I are certainly on the same page. I agree 120%.
    Sandy
    www.sugarbrook.com
    hunter/jumper ponies


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2004
    Location
    Virginia. We Do Ponies!
    Posts
    11,962

    Default

    Common sense should tell anyone/everyone that if it's an act of nature, paddling can't be fixed by a farrier, regardless of how good.
    But a good farrier can make everything better to a certain degree.
    Randee Beckman ~Otteridge Farm, LLC (http://on.fb.me/1iJEqvR)~ Marketing Manager - The Clothes Horse & Jennifer Oliver, Equine Insurance Specialist


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    36,091

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    Quote Originally Posted by VirginiaBred View Post
    Common sense should tell anyone/everyone that if it's an act of nature, paddling can't be fixed by a farrier, regardless of how good.
    Sadly, common sense is lacking in far too many situations, and for some people who are all about the ribbons, it is absolutely not above them to have a farrier "fix" things to alter the gait, even if it means the horse might be lame later. I'm not implying you do this, but it does remain that far, far too many people do terrible things to horses in the name of a ribbon Given all the other abuses horses endure, 'fixing" feet wouldn't even make someone think twice

    But a good farrier can make everything better to a certain degree.
    Only if it's the trim that is causing the paddling. If it's the horse's conformation, then he should be doing nothing to change the degree to which the horse paddles.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2004
    Location
    Virginia. We Do Ponies!
    Posts
    11,962

    Default

    Which is why I said to a certain degree.......
    Randee Beckman ~Otteridge Farm, LLC (http://on.fb.me/1iJEqvR)~ Marketing Manager - The Clothes Horse & Jennifer Oliver, Equine Insurance Specialist



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