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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2007
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    In my car, between work, home, and the barn!
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    355

    Default Speak to me of catteries...

    Sweet kitty is an incurable bed-mice chaser... my toes have the scars to prove it. DH and I have no problem just chucking her off the bed, and she takes the hint after a while, but we have four very small children who all get woken up several times a nightby this stuff. The kids are too small to have their doors shut at night.

    Miss Kitty has slept in the laundry room at night to avoid the problem. It's warm, she has her bed and water and litterbox there, she's happy. She does make a racket as soon as she hears anyone get up in the morning, but that's okay - the first person up just lets her out into the rest of the house.

    Wee girlie has now moved into the room directly across from the laundry room, however, and every time she so much as rolls over in bed, kitty sets to yowling and crashing around and scratching at the door to be let out. I'm thinking a small cattery, somewhere else in the house, might be a good nighttime solution. Any thoughts? Other alternatives? I realize she'd love to be loose in the house at night, but the kids are too small to deal with her play at night, so for the next few years, at least, we need an another solution.

    What features should I look for in getting a bedroom for kitty?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Location
    Western South Dakota
    Posts
    2,400

    Default

    I think it would be perfectly fine to get a nice "cage" for Ms. Kitty at night. Just make sure it is large enough for her to have her litter box, food, water and bed in. Cats LOVE shelves to sleep on. I'm sure you can buy ready made but I made a floor to ceiling cage in an empty corner. Mine is made with PVC pipe and 1 inch square cage wire. It has carpeted shelves for the kitties and works well. We capture/tame/Spay/Neuter strays so needed a way to contain WILD kitties.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    15,515

    Default

    Either a cattery or screen doors on the kids doorways. A friend of mine put in the screen doors and it worked out really well.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2001
    Location
    Toronto, Canada.
    Posts
    6,133

    Default

    Screen door is a great idea! Cheap and removable if it gets destroyed, yet may allow you to sleep when the kitty wants to be awake!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 10, 2006
    Location
    Middle of Nowhere, take a right, FL
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    4,405

    Default

    I have a cat porch with screen (to keep bugs out) and hardware cloth (to keep bigger things out and cats in). The cats access it through pet doors I cut into the window screen and they love to go out at night and watch and listen to the night creatures. Cats are not dogs, I do not like the crate idea. How old are the kids? We had our doors closed from day one. If you are that worried how about baby monitors and/or walkie talkies or something. Screen doors (with animal screen) as mentioned above are also a good idea. But everyone eventually is going to have to learn to ignore the nightly kitty noise however old they are!
    Every mighty oak was once a nut that stood its ground.

    Proud Closet Canterer! Member Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2009
    Posts
    146

    Default

    I've previously converted a closet. Remove the closet door and replace it with a screen door, with hardware cloth instead of the screen. Put in a litter-box, a cat tree and a couple of cozy sleep spots and you're good to go!

    Chasing bed mice is something they normally outgrow after a while, so this doesn't need to be permanent. Also, you can re-direct and wear out. Have a good romp an hour or two before bed.
    We like "cat-fishing". Get a small child's or toy fishing rod and attach a toy mouse to the line and "fish" away! be sure to stop before Kitty really wants to, and be sure to let her catch it often. This keeps her interested and eager to play next time. It also gets her sleeping at night!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2001
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    Center of the Universe
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    Default

    why can't you just shut the cat out of the bedrooms and let her have the rest of the house to roam in? cats are fairly nocturnal, and shutting one up in a small space during their prime time of activity seems rather inappropriate to me.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2001
    Location
    Toronto, Canada.
    Posts
    6,133

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    why can't you just shut the cat out of the bedrooms and let her have the rest of the house to roam in? cats are fairly nocturnal, and shutting one up in a small space during their prime time of activity seems rather inappropriate to me.
    I think the OP stated in her first post that her kids were too young to have their doors shut.

    My theory on cats is that they want all doors open...always. If its closed, they want in there. If its open, they are like the honey badger.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2007
    Location
    In my car, between work, home, and the barn!
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    Default

    Yes... I would have no problem just shutting the bedroom doors if the kids were older, but they're just too young.

    We're still looking at different solutions. The laundry room is big and she has her cat tree, bed, water, food, litterbox, and about a zillion toys in there so it's not like she's cramped in there. Before DD moved across the hall, she would happily go in there at night and be quiet until morning - it's just now that she can hear someone across the hall, she thinks it's playtime NOW! We may just give it some time and see if she figures out that quiet stirrings in the middle of the night do not mean that someone is going to come get her breakfast and play with her.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2002
    Location
    Boogerville, USA
    Posts
    858

    Default

    Maybe put a radio in with her tuned to a classical music or 'Zen' radio station?



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2005
    Location
    Eastern Shore, MD
    Posts
    1,226

    Default

    I have one of these: http://www.petco.com/product/112629/...20Condo-112629 for my cat. He's good with it, though if he wants out, he'll make noise (usually by meowing, but sometimes, he'll rattle the bars) until you let him out, so it may not fix your problem, unless you were going to set it up somewhere else in the house.

    If she's generally good in the laundry room, though, I'd definitely try nasalberry's music suggestion - classical station, turned down low enough to create some "white noise" might be enough to cover up the wee child's nighttime rustlings.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2001
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    Default

    Yes... I would have no problem just shutting the bedroom doors if the kids were older, but they're just too young.
    I must admit to not comprehending this statement in any way. What does a child's age have to do with shut doors? don't you WANT them to stay in their rooms at night? although even toddlers seem capable of opening and closing doors. Most parents seem to close the doors on the bedrooms of their children at night, regardless of child's age. They use baby monitors for the relatively helpless infants, but get rid of those once the child gains a bit of mobility.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2004
    Location
    Central Florida
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    4,043

    Default

    Who cares? I shut my 2yr old and 3yr old doors but if the OP isn't comfortable doing so then she can buy a kittie house. The thing isn't being abused. Open doors doesn't mean the kids romp the house. My daughter (3) wants the door a tad bit open at night sometimes it makes her feel better
    *^*^*^
    Himmlische Traumpferde
    "Wenn Du denkst es geht nicht mehr, kommt von irgendwo ein kleines Licht daher"



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2008
    Posts
    139

    Default

    Sounds to me like kitty might be a bit lonely...perhaps get another kitty? Then they can wear each other out and kitty won't be a dependent on you for entertainment.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2011
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    East Longmeadow, MA
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    Default

    Oh, yes! A second kitty is an excellent idea! Didn't Ernest Hemingway say "One cat naturally leads to another"? (Look at me, now I have five . . . .)
    What's wrong with you?? Your cheese done slid off its cracker?!?!



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