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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2000
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    Greenville, MI,
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    12,239

    Thumbs down Amish Horses...

    This is pretty much a vent.
    My work takes me to a community near where I live that has quite a few Amish farms.
    This morning while out on my route, I happened upon an Amish Buggy Truckin down the side of a rather busy 2 lane road.
    I had to slow to get a wider berth around him and looked at the horse... MY god, Big winter coat, Wet from sweat, and foam from the chest harness, head straight up, mouth open foam all over its mouth, and skinny, and being trotted off his legs.
    Okay, These are religious people? These animals are their mode of transportation, their lively hood in many instances, yet they treat them worse than some treat cars. I have seen some in the summer, tied to a hitching post in the blazing sun of a small grocery in the area, sweaty, no water. heads hanging.
    Seriously I don't get it. MAybe it is just this area but I have never seen one that looked in good weight or not stressed to the max.
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.


    16 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
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    I have never seen the opposite. They all look to be in good weight and just truck along the road like they are in their own little world in a different era. They do have their heads up higher than looks normal to me but don't seem to be distressed about it. They definitely seem to feel differently about their horses than most of us do because they are a mode of transportation or a means to get a job done as opposed to a pet so they don't keep them around when they can't do the job anymore.


    7 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2010
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    1,843

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    Saddlebred Rescue is participating in a horse care clinic for the Amish. They are working with a guy who I think is their broker and also with some others with connections to the community. I admire their constructive approach that also is taking into account the culture of the Amish. SBR has also taken the time to build relationships with many Amish folks and that also has to help. Small steps, but positive. Love that rescue!

    I'm sure they would be happy to talk to you at length about the Amish if you would contact them.


    14 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2000
    Location
    Greenville, MI,
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    I understand that they are not "Pets" or show horses, but I am not kiding, this one and several others I have seen looked in terrible shape.
    I shudder to think what there legs look like on close inspection.
    Like I said maybe it is the area.
    Edited to add I had a friend several years ago who hired an Amish gentleman to do some building in his barn, and put up a fence. He arrived every morning in his buggy, And left the horse tied to a tree all day, no water no hay.
    My friend who had lovely grass paddocks, and an open one offered it to the man for his horse to stay while he worked. The man declined, said the horse was fine where he was. Later in the day while the man was working in the barn, my friend offered a bucked of water to the horse who sucked it down like he had never had any.
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.


    8 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2009
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    724

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    Sadly they don't want them 'soft.' I've seen them tied up, still hitched to the buggy, to a rail - ALL day - with their front feet standing with their weight on them down in a ditch. They can't even swat at flies and NO WATER ALL day.

    Breaks my heart to see the lame ones trotting for miles on the hard pavement or worse the rocks.

    I never see them fed in the winter during the day - no round bales out, barns look empty - where's the feed??? I sure don't even see the storage for it on the farms. Even the lofts look empty. and they also have cows....

    I've only met one Amish man who loved his horses. He was the exception.


    15 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2000
    Location
    Greenville, MI,
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    Quote Originally Posted by babecakes View Post
    Sadly they don't want them 'soft.' I've seen them tied up, still hitched to the buggy, to a rail - ALL day - with their front feet standing with their weight on them down in a ditch. They can't even swat at flies and NO WATER ALL day.

    Breaks my heart to see the lame ones trotting for miles on the hard pavement or worse the rocks.

    I never see them fed in the winter during the day - no round bales out, barns look empty - where's the feed??? I sure don't even see the storage for it on the farms. Even the lofts look empty. and they also have cows....

    I've only met one Amish man who loved his horses. He was the exception.
    Well I knew it was not just my area. I think they are just a vehicle. but most people treat there cars better so they will last longer.
    Is this not one of Gods creatures?
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 24, 2007
    Location
    Warsaw, On
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    475

    Arrow

    I am no expert, but I think they believe that man has dominion over all of god's creation...so being one of "god's creatures" is not a place of special comfort. My husband's family is old order Mennonite, which is very similar to Omish. Some really love their horses, but this is not the majority. It makes me think that Black Beauty is just the surface of the abuse that came before the car.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulosey View Post
    I am no expert, but I think they believe that man has dominion over all of god's creation...so being one of "god's creatures" is not a place of special comfort. My husband's family is old order Mennonite, which is very similar to Omish. Some really love their horses, but this is not the majority. It makes me think that Black Beauty is just the surface of the abuse that came before the car.
    I agree that this is probably the mentality. There are a lot of Amish involved in puppy mills, too. To them, all animals are a commodity, and the amount of care you give is based on the maximum return on investment. Minimal time and money invested for maximum return. If you can drive a horse hard for 12 years and sell it at auction after the newest colt is ready to go between the traces, or put five dogs in a tiny pen, why not? You feed your milk cows because there's a correlation between the feed and the amount of milk produced.

    I don't think you can mistake "old-fashioned" for "kind-hearted". They may not raise their fist toward another person, but they look at animals in a whole different light. And if you hear some of the stories from the ex-Amish, many aren't all that kind to the people, either.

    StG


    22 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
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    Depends on the Amish. We've got one bunch here that treats their horses like crap like the OP has seen, but the other 2 clans I'm familiar with treat their critters pretty well. They're still transportation, but the horses are in good weight and generally not too far from home- they use "Yoder toters" for the longer trips to town.



  10. #10
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    Feb. 22, 2012
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    PA
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    Its not just MI its PA too. I regularly see the poor trotters soaked and foam covered tied to a rail,no cooler, no water, no hay, at the weekly hay and produce auction. I am not talking just one horse- the whole line of them look like this.


    This includes Mennonites, not just limited to Amish.
    Last edited by Pa Rural; Mar. 15, 2013 at 10:13 PM. Reason: correction


    3 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 20, 2009
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    This is no different than other horse (or dog/cat) owners; some take good care, some dont. But the culture is different for sure. I was involved some years ago w/ a local humane society whose turf included an area that was heavily Amish populated. The HS started a spay/neuter effort within the Amish community - it took some time and the "right approach" but was ultimately well received and is successful.
    We don't get less brave; we get a bigger sense of self-preservation........


    7 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2007
    Location
    Camden, DE
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    The ones we have around here appear to be alright for the most part. They're a little slimmer, but I expect that for a beast that is in a high amount of work/trotting distances. A passed an Older Amish couple a few months back with a gorgeous horse pulling their buggy. That horse was in great condition and just a good lookin' fella. I do understand that some do not have the same opinion or standards of care for their animals. It's unfortunate, and I may not agree with it.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 15, 2004
    Location
    Ontario
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    I have absolutely NO respect for mennonites in my area. We also have a meat auction on Tuesdays and it is heart breaking to see them come with one horse and leave with another. At least, in town, most stores/malls have built shelters for the horses with access to water and the horses are at least out of the sun or rain. They are also often blanketed while waiting... but still, I look at the poor horse knowing he won't have a good retirement in a field! Horses are just tools to them.
    The irony? the best tack store in the area is run by mennonites and they have learned to appreciate people's love for horses = $$$$. One of the guys working there told me that he did keep his Belgians after retirement. I remember him saying "I get criticized, but I love them!"

    My own mare (clyde x) was run through the auction because she would not let them harness her... and she turned out to be a great jumper. She is enjoying her retirement at age 21!


    6 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 11, 2008
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    138

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    It is biblical to care for our animals. Proverbs (12:10) "A righteous man cares for the needs of his animals." We have dominion over the animals therefore we are their stewards, expected to provide for their welfare.

    In Luke is the passage about rescuing an ox from a well even on the Sabbath which is illustrative of the command to always care for the Lord's creatures.

    I do not understand how the Amish and others can justify their treatment of God's creatures in anything but a gentle, humane manner. It is not about minimal care for them, but rather is about our best care for them. It is to the glory of God who created them and gave us stewardship over them.


    41 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2000
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    Greenville, MI,
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flurry84 View Post
    It is biblical to care for our animals. Proverbs (12:10) "A righteous man cares for the needs of his animals." We have dominion over the animals therefore we are their stewards, expected to provide for their welfare.

    In Luke is the passage about rescuing an ox from a well even on the Sabbath which is illustrative of the command to always care for the Lord's creatures.

    I do not understand how the Amish and others can justify their treatment of God's creatures in anything but a gentle, humane manner. It is not about minimal care for them, but rather is about our best care for them. It is to the glory of God who created them and gave us stewardship over them.
    This~
    I have a different opinion of Amish after reading and hearing things over the years. I always imagined them to be kind gentle people. Hmm.
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2011
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    racetrack
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flurry84 View Post
    It is biblical to care for our animals. Proverbs (12:10) "A righteous man cares for the needs of his animals." We have dominion over the animals therefore we are their stewards, expected to provide for their welfare.

    In Luke is the passage about rescuing an ox from a well even on the Sabbath which is illustrative of the command to always care for the Lord's creatures.

    I do not understand how the Amish and others can justify their treatment of God's creatures in anything but a gentle, humane manner. It is not about minimal care for them, but rather is about our best care for them. It is to the glory of God who created them and gave us stewardship over them.
    You are right. However I do believe that the majority of the Amish are restricted by their bishops to which sections of the Bible they are even allowed to read. Those passages apparently aren't on the list by the sound of what the OP is seeing

    "Pat the horse; kick yourself" - Carl Hester


    5 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2009
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    And there's the auction with the Amish draft horse with a foot cemented in a bucket so they could sell him to the kill buyer.



  18. #18
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    Apr. 22, 2006
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    1,331

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flurry84 View Post
    It is biblical to care for our animals. Proverbs (12:10) "A righteous man cares for the needs of his animals." We have dominion over the animals therefore we are their stewards, expected to provide for their welfare.

    In Luke is the passage about rescuing an ox from a well even on the Sabbath which is illustrative of the command to always care for the Lord's creatures.

    I do not understand how the Amish and others can justify their treatment of God's creatures in anything but a gentle, humane manner. It is not about minimal care for them, but rather is about our best care for them. It is to the glory of God who created them and gave us stewardship over them.
    Dominion, contrary to popular belief, does not translate to callous indifference to or causing the suffering of animals. All religions take the position that it is wrong to cause animals to suffer in order that we may profit. It is just one more of those pesky religious teachings that are mostly ignored.
    "The captive bolt is not a proper tool for slaughter of equids they regain consciousness 30 seconds after being struck fully aware they are being vivisected." Dr Friedlander DVM & frmr Chief USDA Insp


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
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    Twin Cities
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    Quote Originally Posted by babecakes View Post
    And there's the auction with the Amish draft horse with a foot cemented in a bucket so they could sell him to the kill buyer.
    explain. Is this so horse could walk?
    Last edited by Hippolyta; Mar. 16, 2013 at 02:33 AM.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
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    Mar. 26, 2011
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    Pennsylvania
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    My saddle maker is an Amish man and his horse looks fine to me. Maybe it's not the Amish, but that some people treat their animals hard. You don't have to dress Plain to do it.

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).


    11 members found this post helpful.

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