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  1. #1
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    Default The bells! The bells! ... Bell boots, that is.

    OK fellow COTHers -- I need suggestions for hard bell boots, not gum, rubber, or neoprene. One of my youngsters is a leggy and very extravagant mover, who consistently hits and cuts his ankles and heels. The vet, farrier, chiro and I have been working together to figure out a way to save this poor guy's front legs ... he's starting to look pretty chewed up. I've tried many different styles and brands of bell boots with no luck. The vet was out today doing shots, etc, and suggested we try Kevlar. However, the Kevlar boots on Dover look thin, and I need something that will not only not tear, but that will truly prevent injury. What's the best heavy duty / hard bell out there?



  2. #2
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    Are these for 24/7 wear, or riding only?
    If for 24/7, the Roma thick bottom pull-ons get my vote. They are very stiff and thick (the material is not like most rubber pull-ons which are softer and flexible). A huge PITA to get on, which is why I can't recommend them for daily on-off wear.
    As Peter, Paul, and Mary say, a dragon lives forever.



  3. #3
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    They'd be for riding only. I've tried the heavy Roma ones this last go, but he came in from work yesterday bleeding again ... the boot didn't rip though :/

    Currently we're going through seven sets a year, and I decided to pull his shoes two months ago in an effort to save his heels. The farrier has his toes rolled as much as possible to facilitate break-over, but he's still tearing up his legs and boots. So far I've tried: Davis, Roma, Prof Choice, Eskadron (heavy rubber), and Classic.



  4. #4
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    Default

    I've never tried them, but these look like what you are describing: http://www.smartpakequine.com/veredu...FRCf4Aod12UA2w


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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by DancingFoalFarms View Post
    They'd be for riding only. I've tried the heavy Roma ones this last go, but he came in from work yesterday bleeding again ... the boot didn't rip though :/
    Is he hurting himself through the boot, or getting under it?
    As Peter, Paul, and Mary say, a dragon lives forever.



  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrowneDragon View Post
    Is he hurting himself through the boot, or getting under it?
    I believe he's hurting himself through the boot; his "bites" are usually directly under the fetlock and on the upper part of the heel bulb -- parts covered by the boots and wraps. Yesterday the boot wasn't torn, but was bloody about halfway down, rather than toward the top / bottom of the bell. The vet looked at the cuts today and said it looks like he's hitting the actual fetlock, and then stepping downward onto the heel.



  7. #7
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    Hmm...it sounds like maybe he's scraping on the way down ? If that is the case, perhaps a combo boot where there is no gap between the leg and hoof may help?
    Example: http://profchoice.com/i-7325554-smb-combo-boots.html
    I don't see how he could really directly hit himself and cut through the skin without damaging the boot, multiple times.
    As Peter, Paul, and Mary say, a dragon lives forever.



  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrowneDragon View Post
    Hmm...it sounds like maybe he's scraping on the way down ? If that is the case, perhaps a combo boot where there is no gap between the leg and hoof may help?
    Example: http://profchoice.com/i-7325554-smb-combo-boots.html
    I don't see how he could really directly hit himself and cut through the skin without damaging the boot, multiple times.
    I don't either, but the boot is bloody but not ripped. The things this horse does never ceases to amaze me though, lol Thanks for the suggestion about the combo boots!



  9. #9
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    Default

    Thinline bell boots are very sturdy and a good value for the price.


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  10. #10
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    Default

    Have you seen those yellow things in the right side bar? Shoesecure.com?



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by atr View Post
    Have you seen those yellow things in the right side bar? Shoesecure.com?
    I have, but he's barefoot and his strike range is above the coverage offered by those. I think I may go with Dutch wrapping and Kevlar boots.



  12. #12
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    Consider reevaluating the way the hind end is trimmed/shod. My horse will forge when she is uncomfortable behind. The front legs stay on the ground longer because she is putting more weight up front. Fix the back end and the front gets quicker off the ground and the forging stops.
    "The mighty oak is a nut who stood its ground"

    "...you'll never win Olympic gold by shaking a carrot stick at a warmblood..." see u at x


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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by DancingFoalFarms View Post
    OK fellow COTHers -- I need suggestions for hard bell boots, not gum, rubber, or neoprene. One of my youngsters is a leggy and very extravagant mover, who consistently hits and cuts his ankles and heels.
    How old is the horse and how long has this been happening?

    The vet, farrier, chiro and I have been working together to figure out a way to save this poor guy's front legs ...
    Why not figure out why he is interfering instead of figuring out how to prevent the damage from interfering?

    he's starting to look pretty chewed up. I've tried many different styles and brands of bell boots with no luck. The vet was out today doing shots, etc, and suggested we try Kevlar. However, the Kevlar boots on Dover look thin, and I need something that will not only not tear, but that will truly prevent injury. What's the best heavy duty / hard bell out there?
    Bell boots prevent injury to the heel bulbs and coronary band of the foot that is wearing the boot. Bell boots do not prevent the foot wearing the boot from injuring the opposing limb.

    Bell boots do not address the root cause - WHY does the horse interfere?

    Horses interfere for several reasons the most prevalent of those are;

    1. Neurological problem - Lyme Disease and EPM are common offenders.
    2. Abnormal weight bearing due to compensation musculoskeletal discomfort.
    3. Inadequate farriery.


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  14. #14
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    In answer to your questions:
    He's a leggy and short backed four year old Holsteiner, 17hh and still growing. He has no health, neuro, or farriery issues, has 2x monthly chiro, weekly massage, a top sport horse farrier (AFA CJF) who specializes in Natural Balance, has clean x-rays, and was seen yesterday for his shots / health check by our regular vet who has a background in equine bio-mechanics. We use Rood and Riddle or Colorado State for big stuff, and they did x-rays etc, on the horse before he began u/s training -- he's clean and healthy. The horse has only been under saddle a short while and has a HUGE overtrack at walk and trot -- the vet and chiro refer to him as "Mr Rubberband Man."

    The reason for interference is that he's a young, big-moving horse who (according to vet, chiro, farrier, saddler, and SRS coach) hasn't quite learned how to move his front end out of the way quickly enough; with strength and balance, this will correct itself. However, in the meantime he needs boots that protect his front end. Note that he doesn't interfere every stride or even every day; however, consistent, weekly interference injuries need to be accounted for and prevented as best possible. Consequently, I need to find an overreach boot that dissipates strike force, lasts, and fits well. Rubber and gum tear and don't offer enough protection, neoprene rubs him, and certain brands that offer high strike force protection don't come in large enough sizes (he needs an XXL). I've looked into the Dalmar boots, but reviews indicate that the carbon fiber pad shatters and can cut the horse. The Verdus Piaffe boots also have a problem with stretching and breaking. That leaves me with the option of a traditional-style bell, but I'm not sure which brands and materials hold up and offer solid protection. Although I've just run across leather overreach boots by Prestige that look like they might work.

    Thanks for all your feedback!



  15. #15
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    Default

    Why not have a harness or saddle shop make custom fitted leather boots?


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  16. #16
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    Oohh la la.... custom anything is just lovely. When I win the lottery I'm gonna have a wardrobe full of all custom tailored clothes.... Yeah custom boots sounds like a good idea. We are too accustomed to 'off the rack' in the modern age. We forget that humans can actually fabricate tools and equipment from scratch!!!


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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by DancingFoalFarms View Post
    I don't either, but the boot is bloody but not ripped. The things this horse does never ceases to amaze me though, lol Thanks for the suggestion about the combo boots!
    What you're describing makes me envision that something like this would resolve your issue, but I can't really picture how he is managing to CUT himself through the boots?

    http://www.horseloverz.com/Horse-Boo...mbo-Boots.html

    Also, premier equine makes a kevlar/polycarbonate boot with a lifetime guarantee on the strike plate, so they sound pretty confident it won't shatter. Also make a kevlar bell boot.

    http://www.premierequine.co.uk/acata...ing_Boots.html



  18. #18
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    Harness racing is big in my area. The local Amish harness shop near me makes custom interference boots for protecting the legs on crooked legged harness race horses that hit themselves going around the turns. http://www.centralequine.com/busines....aspx?id=10648


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  19. #19
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    Davis bell boots. They are used by reiners so are hard to find outside western tack stores. They are made of a hard-shelled rubber and are the only type of bell boot that will hold up to the kind of abuse you are talking about.

    I have them on my youngster who wears them 24/7 with no rubs or guck under the boots.
    Surgeon General warns: "drinking every time Trump lies during the debate could result in acute alcohol poisoning."


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  20. #20
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    This is the style boot commonly used on harness racing horses that overreach. It's hard leather formed to the horses' hoof/heel. The boots are very lightweight and do not turn or rub.


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