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  1. #21
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2005
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    best place so far
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    1,242

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    Quote Originally Posted by jdeboer01 View Post
    Where exactly is this stated? Lol. Someone said that they wouldnt want to "commute" multiple times a day. I said I'd go there and stay all day.
    Are you going to feed, water, check on the other co-op horses, etc. then too? Most folks have day jobs that wouldn't allow them to hang out at their co-op farm all day. The riding co-op places I know that work is because the work (feeding, watering, cleaning, etc.) is shared amoungst the members.

    If you weren't going to do the work for others then they would have to commute to their "farm" twice a day, every day. Not too convenient. Especially if they also have to go to a different farm each day to tend to any riding age horses they have as well.
    Read about my time at the Hannoveraner Verband Breeders Courses:
    http://blumefarm.com/hannoveranercourse2011.html
    http://blumefarm.com/hannoveranercourse2012.html



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2001
    Location
    Catharpin, Virginia
    Posts
    6,687

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    Having a bunch of PG mares may be easy early on... but when they are term, it's all hands on deck, especially that last 30 days.

    I can't imagine such a scenario working without a full time broodmare manager -- and staff to bring in, watch, do stalls, yada yada. And rotating staff. No single person can stay up all night for a myriad of mares who have delivery dates that can span months (well...I did, never again.)

    Term mares are THE most time and work intensive of all horses, if you want to do it right. Up to that point a co-op might work, but after that it's a whole different story.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2010
    Posts
    1,693

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    sid, you are on to something! I'd love a weanling-raising farm where I could visit and train my own, but not have to do the intensive work I now do. In fact, weaning through 2 and a half or so would be perfect for me. You aren't too far away from me at all. I'm just sending two 3 year olds off to my young horse starter and a weanling off to be prepped for hunter breeding, leaving my two year old home for me to show and a mare who will foal in May. It's carrying the different ages that, while fun and loving it, gets complicated and ties me to home more than I like. For me, it would all depend upon safety, consistency of care, and board costs.

    This thread is beneficial since it gets us brainstorming.

    Diane Halpin & Laurel Leaf Hanoverians: Facebook
    "laurelleafhanoverians.com"



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov. 21, 2007
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    877

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blume Farm View Post
    Are you going to feed, water, check on the other co-op horses, etc. then too? Most folks have day jobs that wouldn't allow them to hang out at their co-op farm all day.
    So, these folks with the full time jobs and all their pregnant mares at home -- do they quit their jobs during foaling and breeding season?

    What's the difference between hanging out at the farm all day (if it's several miles from where you "live") and hanging out at home all day if you keep your broodmares at home?

    If someone is keeping their horses at home, and they have a full time job, then whose taking care of them? Are they paying someone to take care of their horses at their own home?

    I honestly think I need to change the title of the thread as the word "co-op" is getting in the way of what I mean. Basically, the only idea I'm trying to get across is that of a small group of people "going in" on a real estate deal and the setting up and building of necessary housing and equipment. I'm not talking cooperative horse keeping and taking care of other people's horses as part of the agreement. If one of the owners wants to hire someone to take care of their horses, then whatevuh! If the group decides to hire and share someone, great! Seriously -- try to think of it as a business condo.

    Quote Originally Posted by Blume Farm View Post
    The riding co-op places I know that work is because the work (feeding, watering, cleaning, etc.) is shared amoungst the members.
    Are the people keeping horses at this location also joint owners of the property?
    www.sauconycreeksporthorses.com
    Dedicated to breeding Friesian Sporthorses
    with world class pedigrees and sport suitability



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