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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 8, 2008
    Posts
    778

    Default Found a Stubben saddle at the thrift store today...

    Should have I bought it?

    I don't know much about Stubbens, but what I could read, it was one made in Germany, definitely older, but couldn't find a year, or serial number on it, anything there was was pretty worn off.

    It also had some mold spots on it, how hard is it to get mold off?

    I'm thinking for resale. I don't really need it, but would be a fun investment?

    I was strolling through the thrift store with my beloved, and we saw it, we also some some Professional's Choice SMBII there for $20

    I never thought I would see such cool horse stuff at a thrift store!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
    Location
    southeast Georgia
    Posts
    3,372

    Default

    Mold is easy to remove with an ammonia-water solution. What model is it? If you post a picture, we can probably tell you. Most likely it is a Siegfried since this has been Stubben's most popular model for years.

    The tree width is usually stamped on the right-hand billet guard under the serial number. The silver buttons often give a clue as to the saddle's age. I am posting a link to help you determine how old it is.

    http://www.ehow.com/how_5663902_tell...en-saddle.html

    If it is really cheap--like under $100--it might be worth cleaning up for resale. That depends on its condition. You'll have to make sure the tree is sound, and if it is old, it might need new billets--not a cheap repair.

    The resale value depends on the model and the appearance of the saddle. Look on ebay and see what they are going for.
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    4,702

    Default

    .... my kids shop the thrift stores for treasure... best find to date is the specialized camera lens my son found for $25.00 that he resold for $2500.00



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
    Posts
    4,054

    Default

    Do your best to be sure the tree isn't broken, the panels not rotted, super hard or falling off, and the billets not dry rotted or coming off.

    Would be a real shame to bring it home only to discover its no more good than a paperweight.

    And it would be doubly a shame to clean it up and sell it on and a rider or horse gets hurt because there's something wrong with it.
    Worry is the biggest enemy of the present... it’s like using your imagination to create things you don’t want.
    Click for the ideal stocking stuffer for anyone equine!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 1999
    Location
    Shangri-LA
    Posts
    2,047

    Default

    Where are the thrift stores you all are shopping at? I sure don't find things like that at mine.

    As far as the saddle, look it over good, is the flocking still good, check the tree to see if it's obviously broken, billets still good? If it looks serviceable but just needs a good cleaning and it was dirt cheap you could get it and try to resell it but old used Stubbens are probably not going to make your very much.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 1999
    Location
    Harrisburg, PA USA
    Posts
    6,545

    Default

    Ahhh, thrift stores:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?featur...&v=QK8mJJJvaes

    [salty language alert - don't play if you don't like it]


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2003
    Location
    Boston Area
    Posts
    8,485

    Default

    This is good advice.

    If you don't know how to identify a broken tree here's a thread that already addressed it.

    http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...saddle-how-too

    Other things to avoid are excessive wear to the seat (it's a very expensive repair) and wear/repairs in the panels.

    Mold wouldn't bother me that much but I would want to check to see the panels don't have a lot of cracking and that the stitching isn't too loose. Cleaned up, the saddle is probably worth about $250 so keep that in mind.

    As from the SMB? You can find them used for $20 in lots of places. Not an incredible deal. I had a pair that I sold for about that much on eBay and they had only been used a few times.


    Quote Originally Posted by buck22 View Post
    Do your best to be sure the tree isn't broken, the panels not rotted, super hard or falling off, and the billets not dry rotted or coming off.

    Would be a real shame to bring it home only to discover its no more good than a paperweight.

    And it would be doubly a shame to clean it up and sell it on and a rider or horse gets hurt because there's something wrong with it.
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
    EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.



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