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  1. #101
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    I banked cedar shavings up the back of my horse's stall all last summer in an effort to reduce flies. If you do a search on here (where I found out about this), you'll find that many people either mix in a little cedar shavings or use them exclusively in the summer b/c of the flies.

    Apparently, some horses can have a reaction to them, but I believe it's just an itchy/hive-y kind of thing; I've never heard of a horse being seriously ill or dying from cedar. Seems pretty far-fetched.

    Best of luck!


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  2. #102
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    Mar. 14, 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frizzle View Post
    I banked cedar shavings up the back of my horse's stall all last summer in an effort to reduce flies. If you do a search on here (where I found out about this), you'll find that many people either mix in a little cedar shavings or use them exclusively in the summer b/c of the flies.

    Apparently, some horses can have a reaction to them, but I believe it's just an itchy/hive-y kind of thing; I've never heard of a horse being seriously ill or dying from cedar. Seems pretty far-fetched.

    Best of luck!
    Thanks! This is what I was thinking as well, just wanted to be sure!



  3. #103
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    Jun. 24, 2005
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    The only problem I've heard about with cedar is in the case of very small pets, and that's with all cedar, not a few shred mixed into a big amount of shavings. I really doubt an animal the size of a horse will have a problem.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by JanM View Post
    The only problem I've heard about with cedar is in the case of very small pets, and that's with all cedar, not a few shred mixed into a big amount of shavings. I really doubt an animal the size of a horse will have a problem.
    Cedar CAN cause problems for poultry as well. As long as there is plenty of air circulation / ventilation, it shouldn't be a problem.

    I would be very sure that the sawmill folks understand that the black walnut is a very big deal and that they don't just give you lip service on that.
    Disclaimer: Just a beginner who knows nothing about nothing


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  5. #105
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    Jun. 1, 2002
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    Indiana
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    We once got a load of sasafrass trees? Entire barn smelled like black licorice.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  6. #106
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    Feb. 7, 2005
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    Lancaster, PA
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    The issue with cedar for small animals is that it gives off aromatic hydrocarbons, which can cause respiratory ailments. However, the same is true of pine. So I don't think cedar would cause an issue for a horse, especially in small amounts.



  7. #107
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    Feb. 16, 2003
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    MI USA
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    Cedar is no longer the "best" bedding for small animals, it can have cedar oil on it, which can get on the little animals and because it can cause breathing problems in those little animals.

    A horse can react to that cedar oil in the wood shavings, usually with a hive problem. Though some could react with breathing problems, especially if the animal already has breathing issues.

    A small amount of cedar shavings mixed in bedding should not bother a normal horse in most instances.



  8. #108
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    Jan. 2, 2006
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    Dallas, NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by ldaziens View Post
    I would be very sure that the sawmill folks understand that the black walnut is a very big deal and that they don't just give you lip service on that.
    I would like to stress this again. I've read as little as a tablespoon of black walnut could cause lamintis (which could lead to the horse having to be put down, or a long painful healing process).
    I want a signature but I have nothing original to say except: "STHU and RIDE!!!

    Wonderful COTHER's I've met: belleellis, stefffic, snkstacres and janedoe726.


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  9. #109
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    Aug. 9, 2007
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    Cedar is harmless to a horse. And repels bugs. All southern women have cedar closets and cedar chests, because the cedar keeps moths away.

    However, my mare Callie was allergic to cedar. Found this out when 2nd BO put cedar shavings in stalls one time instead of pine shavings. (She was only allergic to cedar and to ant bite.)

    If the boarder is going to continue to complain about everything, it is going to be a long time till the end of the month. I suggest wine, but something stronger might be required. For you.

    And yes, black walnut is used in studies at vet schools as it causes laminitis. So no walnut shavings should ever be used in stalls. And no walnut trees should be in pastures, etc.



  10. #110
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    Nov. 29, 2007
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    OP, I'm sure at this point everything about those two grates on your nerves, and I really do understand that, but was she or bff rude in how they asked about the shavings? I mean, they saw the bedding was different and even if you suspect they are looking for things to be picky about -- still, surely it's okay for them to ask for clarification? esp. if they have heard of problems (and we all know what crazy old wives' tales stick around, starting with light-colored hooves being weaker than dark and on down the list).

    Deep breaths, you'll make it! You'll have a peaceful barn back in no time.
    "However complicated and remarkable the rest of his life was going to be, it was here now, come to claim him."- JoAnn Mapson


    3 members found this post helpful.

  11. #111
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by concernedBO View Post
    She said "Cedar will kill a horse" with a dead straight face. I replied "Really, because I have never heard such a thing?" She said she was at a show once and a horse had cedar shavings and it died. I just said that I did not think it was cedar and I'm sure it was fine.
    From the Pacific Northwest: You are right and Krazy is wrong. There are barns that bed with 100% cedar, which we have in abundance around here. Smells great, not as absorbent as pine.

    Yup, they bed with 100% cedar.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


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  12. #112
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    Feb. 16, 2007
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    Now, I don't know if this is just pertaining to the leaves or to the wood itself, but cherry trees are toxic to horses (http://www.equisearch.com/farm_ranch...nt/eqtoxic436/). I saw that you mentioned them as a part of the bedding mix you sometimes get, OP. As I said, the shavings might be fine, but I know the people that put in my paddocks went berzerk when they found cherry trees on my property and told me to wait at least a month after we removed the trees to use the pastures that were exposed to them.
    Nine out of ten times, you'll get it wrong...but it's that tenth time that you get it right that makes all the difference.



  13. #113
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    Jul. 15, 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chardavej View Post
    I would like to stress this again. I've read as little as a tablespoon of black walnut could cause lamintis (which could lead to the horse having to be put down, or a long painful healing process).
    No, there has to be a larger quantity of black walnut in the bedding in order for it to cause issues. Cornell has done extensive studies on the effects of black walnut in the bedding. Last summer I was accidentally delivered a load that had black walnut in it. I asked about the spot of dark shavings in the load and the guy called the mill to ask what wood was in there, he was told that about four planks of black walnut was apparently sent to the wrong bin. They didn't charge me for the load and I got my next load for free, but they did not have the ability to pick up the already dropped bedding. I was in a quandary as to what to do with the bedding, so I called Cornell's large animal vet school which has done a lot of studies on black walnut with horses. One of their vets told me that there would have to be considerably more than 4 planks in a 20 yard delivery and it was probably safe to use. I did not want to chance it so I asked if there could be any ramifications to mixing it in the manure pile and was told not at all. We get a lot of rain and was told there would be no issues with runoff either.
    Every man has a right to his opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts.
    Bernard M. Baruch



  14. #114
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    sorry for the run on paragraph above, for some reason my enter key doesn't want to work.....grrrrr
    Every man has a right to his opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts.
    Bernard M. Baruch


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  15. #115
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    Feb. 16, 2003
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    MI USA
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    On the Black Walnut shavings. A friend got a free couple bags of sawdust from a wood worker neighbor to use for bedding. Great stuff she said! However the mare had swollen legs the next AM. Called the Vet, who came and asked the questions about "any changes?" in things. She said bedding, and had friend call the neighbor about what KIND of wood sawdust was in the bags. Yes to Black Walnut, but "only a little". No idea on percentages, but with removal of that sawdust bedding and treatment, they prevented Lamanitus in mare, got the swelling down on her legs. Ended up with hair coming off the legs in spots, evidently the Walnut oil in wood stuck on hair more. Took time, but mare did finally recover.

    Friend said sawdust was all light color, so probably NOT MUCH Black Walnut in the mix. But the horse reacted BADLY to that little amount, so here is one example from the other side. I wouldn't want to chance using ANY Black Walnut product near my equines. And yeah, ingesting that couple Teaspoons of Black Walnut shavings is what quantity they used in Laminitus studies, according to Vet friends doing the studies.


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  16. #116
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    May. 4, 2003
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    Canada
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    Cedar can cause a reaction in a small percentge of horses - but as mvp said it is very common up here - pire cedar hogfuel for turnout paddocks and sawdust for bedding. It sure does help reduce flies.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  17. #117
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    Mar. 14, 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by cloudyandcallie View Post

    If the boarder is going to continue to complain about everything, it is going to be a long time till the end of the month. I suggest wine, but something stronger might be required. For you.
    LOL, as much as I would love that, I am pregnant...



  18. #118
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Punkie View Post
    Now, I don't know if this is just pertaining to the leaves or to the wood itself, but cherry trees are toxic to horses (http://www.equisearch.com/farm_ranch...nt/eqtoxic436/). I saw that you mentioned them as a part of the bedding mix you sometimes get, OP. As I said, the shavings might be fine, but I know the people that put in my paddocks went berzerk when they found cherry trees on my property and told me to wait at least a month after we removed the trees to use the pastures that were exposed to them.
    It's the wilted leaves of the cherry tree, not the tree or sawdust.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #119
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    Oct. 3, 2002
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    Boogerville, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    It's the wilted leaves of the cherry tree, not the tree or sawdust.
    And a good thing, too as my guy is beavering away at the bark of his cherry tree.



  20. #120
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    Sep. 29, 2009
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    I miss the cedar shavings from living in the PNW. All I can get here is PINE. I used cedar and hemlock for well over 15 years, and NO horse or critter died. I died though when I found out here in the SE that cedar shavings were $$$, and everybody used pine.

    boo hoo. Nothing like a stall full of cedar shavings. ahhh. Also kept the flies at bay much much better.

    Cedar bad for horses, ha ha ha. Black walnut yes. Stoopid Krazy womin.



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