The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 45
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2008
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    873

    Default Working student op-ed/article

    http://www.chronofhorse.com/article/looking-part

    Interesting perspective on working students. Written from an eventer perspective so a bit different from the h/j world but the fundamental message is there.

    Would love to hear others perspectives/opinions on it.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 12, 2002
    Location
    Former Long Islander now in the middle of the Great Lakes
    Posts
    1,658

    Default

    Interesting.. But while the Eventing world may have many of their top riders who come from no money, the same can not be said for the current new crop of Pro's in Hunter Jumper world. As far as the Fancy Tack rooms, trailers, saddle pads , matching this and that , those are designed for the client , not the pro rider or BNT.. those attractions are just that .. attractions , designed to keep the BNC comfortable and pampered, afterall what BNC would be seen sitting in a show tack room that wasn't designed by the Staff of "Country Living " and please don't say this isn't true.. Show management themselves prominently places the BNT fancy Barns while relegating the no name, small independant barns to the back of the stabling area , Fancey doesn't make a trainer or rider in Hunter jumper world , but it attracts the money, just like male peacocks attract female peacocks, without all that colorful plumage no one would notice you. While it does give off the organized, proffessional look , it also says the money comes here.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,417

    Default

    I tried not to take the implied criticism of wannabe-working students serious. The writer suggested that they actually *thought* that "all hat and no cattle" mattered, and that's why so few failed.

    Yeah, I get the point of her argument, but I think it's flawed. That's because I have been to graduate school.

    The economics of becoming a horse trainer are a hell of a lot like those of going to grad school (sorta).

    See, universities and barns want apprentices. They supply cheap if imperfect labor. But neither industry can support a bunch of succeeding WSs/PhDs who become trainers/professors and want real salaries in the end.

    In academic world, the best advice is to not borrow any money for grad school (and probably have some lying around), and also don't go if you don't get into a very top program.

    To me, that sounds like the WS-to-trainer scenario, too. If you don't have the time (which means some money) or the money to create the kind of business that can bring you some clients that will pay you enough to live on, for the love of God, don't become a horse trainer.

    So the author is both right and wrong because-- to be an academic-- she doesn't distinguish between Necessary and Sufficient conditions. It is Necessary to be a good rider, hard worker and yadayada. It is not, however, Sufficient to be one of those and also broke.

    If that is correct, it's a stupid and slightly mean-spirited waste of time to tell the kiddies that if they were just more genuine, just more hard-working, just better riders, just would buy a lesson instead of a saddle pad, they'd have enough to make that WS thing be a true apprenticeship with the prospects of becoming an in-the-black professional at the end.

    Necessary vs. sufficient conditions, my friends. Learn the difference so that you don't make the unjustified criticism wrapped in a logical mistake that this writer did.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    6 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
    Posts
    8,804

    Default

    It does not even have to be limited to working students trying to get to the upper echelons of the sport. The same theories can apply to amateurs who just want to get the most out of the time and dollars they spend on riding.

    Do they own three horses they can't afford to lesson on, or one that they CAN afford regular lessons on?

    Do they blow money on the most expensive possible tack and equipment so that they feel they "look the part" or do they let the fact that their horse is the one who canters around the course like a metronome do the talking?

    Do they get a green horse and take a lesson three times a week to learn how to train from the beginning or do they have a pro ride it until it is ready to do courses?

    Do they blow cash on horseshowing at the lower levels or do they spend that same cash on lessons until the horse is much further along?

    Do they tack up their own horse or do they stand there and watch while the groom does it?

    Do they socialize at horse shows or do they sit by the schooling areas and watch?

    I've had enough trainers who brought $1,500 horses to the A show ring and won circuit championships, and seen enough horses that could EASILY be worth mid five figures that are completely wasted by people who never bother to lesson, that I firmly believe quality horses are made by quality riding.

    Amateurs can certainly learn to ride at a professional level of competence. I'm not saying they will go beat Scott Stewart, but they can certainly ride like a decent pro. The first step is to hold that expectation out for themselves and work toward it (which not everyone wants to do, because it is quite frankly a metric sh*t ton of work and the end result is, ...riding a horse around a sand ring better). People will spend $x on board in whatever area they are in whether they max out their results or not. You can spend $x per month for five years and still have essentially the same horse you had when you started. Personally I would prefer to be paying board for and sitting on a six figure horse by the time I have put five or six years into one, so I try to do what will get me and the horse to that point.

    There are a lot of ways it is possible to spend time and money.
    Some of them lead to more riding and horsemanship skill than others (which, again, not everyone wants to max out their personal ability to ride a horse around a sand ring better, and that's fine).
    The article points out some of the points of divergence.
    Last edited by meupatdoes; Mar. 14, 2013 at 12:35 PM.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,417

    Default

    I tried not to take the implied criticism of wannabe-working students serious. The writer suggested that they actually *thought* that "all hat and no cattle" mattered, and that's why so few failed.

    Yeah, I get the point of her argument, but I think it's flawed. That's because I have been to graduate school.

    The economics of becoming a horse trainer are a hell of a lot like those of going to grad school (sorta).

    See, universities and barns want apprentices. They supply cheap if imperfect labor. But neither industry can support a bunch of succeeding WSs/PhDs who become trainers/professors and want real salaries in the end.

    In academic world, the best advice is to not borrow any money for grad school (and probably have some lying around), and also don't go if you don't get into a very top program.

    To me, that sounds like the WS-to-trainer scenario, too. If you don't have the time (which means some money) or the money to create the kind of business that can bring you some clients that will pay you enough to live on, for the love of God, don't become a horse trainer.

    So the author is both right and wrong because-- to be an academic-- she doesn't distinguish between Necessary and Sufficient conditions. It is Necessary to be a good rider, hard worker and yadayada. It is not, however, Sufficient to be one of those and also broke.

    If that is correct, it's a stupid and slightly mean-spirited waste of time to tell the kiddies that if they were just more genuine, just more hard-working, just better riders, just would buy a lesson instead of a saddle pad, they'd have enough to make that WS thing be a true apprenticeship with the prospects of becoming an in-the-black professional at the end.

    Necessary vs. sufficient conditions, my friends. Learn the difference so that you don't make the unjustified criticism wrapped in a logical mistake that this writer did.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2003
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    10,880

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    If that is correct, it's a stupid and slightly mean-spirited waste of time to tell the kiddies that if they were just more genuine, just more hard-working, just better riders, just would buy a lesson instead of a saddle pad, they'd have enough to make that WS thing be a true apprenticeship with the prospects of becoming an in-the-black professional at the end.
    I don't think it was promised that you would be an in-the-black pro at then end...just that you would have a better shot at it. Just like in any industry. Nothing is ever guaranteed, but there are ways to set yourself up for success
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 7, 2001
    Location
    Usually too far from the barn
    Posts
    8,854

    Default

    mvp hit on something. Like acedemia, barns (at all levels) want and need cheap labor and yet they often fear the potential for competition should the WS actually turn out to be a solid , capable horseman who might then go out and start her own business.

    I envision the WS as a sort of apprentice, taken under the wing of the head trainer and actually taking instruction not only in riding but all facets of horsemanship and herd management. If done right the WS could turn pro and add value to the barn as an assistant, handling the home string during show season or finding a marketable skill like starting babies or developing greenies etc. The problem is that trainers worry that if WS gets good enough they will open a barn and "steal" clients. If trainers treat WS's kindly they'll be far more likely to want to stick around, but then the trainer will have to start paying them for the skillset they helped them develop and that provides another problem.
    F O.B
    Resident racing historian ~~~ Re-riders Clique
    Founder of the Mighty Thoroughbred Clique


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2003
    Posts
    4,875

    Default

    I had a response drafted, but I realized it didn't make sense, so I edited it out while I formulate my thoughts.

    I think my issue with this article is that there still is a minimum financial standard involved. You've gotta be able to pay for the horse + board + lessons + shoes + vet + shows (if you wanna go) + equipment. That is the price of entry.

    The way it is now, you won't find a barn that has a horse for you to ride and take all those lessons on, that is any sort of decent intermediate or advanced ride (I am talking in general, not eventing levels right now) you might find something that can jump around a course of small jumps, or maybe you get REALLY lucky and find an owner to half lease you something good. That's the optimal situation.

    But eventually if you really wanna get good, then you've got to find a way to get your own horse (unless you get hooked up with a big name pro with a soft heart and owners who will let you ride for them). If you can't do that, then you need your own.

    So what about all these folks who don't have access to the top top trainers to take all those lessons with, because they don't have a horse and can't afford to keep one?

    There's a minumum standard of financial backing that allows you to keep a horse and work for free as a working student. I am an adult with a job-- and I'd dearly love to take 3 lessons a week, if I could find an instructor good enough who I could afford, but because I pay board + vet + I have to house, feed, and clothe myself, I can't do that. So then you end up in a chicken or egg: If I don't buy a horse, there isn't something at my level to ride in 3 lessons a week, but if I do buy a horse, I can't afford the horse plus all those lessons.
    Last edited by soloudinhere; Mar. 14, 2013 at 01:41 PM.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,417

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by meupatdoes View Post
    Amateurs can certainly learn to ride at a professional level of competence. I'm not saying they will go beat Scott Stewart, but they can certainly ride like a decent pro. The first step is to hold that expectation out for themselves and work toward it (which not everyone wants to do, because it is quite frankly a metric sh*t ton of work and the end result is, ...riding a horse around a sand ring better). People will spend $x on board in whatever area they are in whether they max out their results or not. You can spend $x per month for five years and still have essentially the same horse you had when you started. Personally I would prefer to be paying board for and sitting on a six figure horse by the time I have put five or six years into one, so I try to do what will get me and the horse to that point.
    I agree. Ammies can learn to ride as well as a pro. Besides the commitment to doing that, it takes the development of a Taste in riding. Do you like to ride the nice one, or do you get on a horse every day in order to improve it? I love the improvement and I can find that in any horse-- whether young or old, fancy or not.

    The economic argument makes sense, too. It costs the same to feed 'em every day no matter what you do with that day. So why not make those days count toward getting the horse you'd like?

    I think good trainers enjoy the process every.single.day. That keeps them coming back, no matter what they have to ride.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 2001
    Location
    Neither here nor there
    Posts
    1,204

    Default

    I found the article pretty condescending.

    The main reason that people aren't getting to the top of the sport is because they're buying too many expensive pairs of breeches? Or will only ride fancy imports?

    I'm sorry, but that's nuts. As someone who worked for years as a working student/groom/low-paid assistant, I am well aware of the barriers to entry in this sport, and being over-focused on "looking the part" is simply not one of them.

    The costs of entry into this sport are prohibitive, and fancy apparel and even horses are the least of it.

    Working students don't get the opportunity to show and move up on other people's horses unless they are already proven as winners on a horse of their own. So the people trying to work their way up from the bottom can very rarely get that first foothold because they cannot afford the costs of the circuit or a horse capable of getting them the results they need to earn rides on others.

    The "working students" who make it are the ones whose families have already put in hundreds of thousands of dollars into their kids' riding.

    And yes, in the past, some of the top riders came from nothing. But I cannot think of ONE person in the new generation of upcoming top riders who did not come from a wealthy family.

    Ok, rant over. Suffice it to say that the article hit pretty close to home and I found it a bit insulting.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "I know nothing with any certainty, but the sight of stars makes me dream." --Vincent Van Gogh


    7 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2003
    Posts
    4,875

    Default

    I think lonewolf hit on what I was getting at.

    I got the same attitude from someone I know who considers herself the be-all of horsemanship-- in EVENTING we don't care what expensive stuff you have, and people look DOWN on you for having nice stuff.

    It's easy to look down, when you're on top.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
    Posts
    8,804

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by soloudinhere View Post
    I think lonewolf hit on what I was getting at.

    I got the same attitude from someone I know who considers herself the be-all of horsemanship-- in EVENTING we don't care what expensive stuff you have, and people look DOWN on you for having nice stuff.

    It's easy to look down, when you're on top.
    I actually agree quite a bit with your first post.
    A lot of times people on this forum say, "Oh, just make up your own horse then to do the A/Os with," and people are like, yes yes, WITH WHAT BOARD AND LESSON MONEY.

    However, the article had a baseline of people who already owned a horse and were buying it matching boots, or people who were buying upper level horses and no lessons instead of cheap horses and lots of lessons.

    The article was admittedly about better allocation of money that was already there.

    On the other hand, there are also quite a few people who CAN afford to board a horse or multiple horses who would have much better horses and be much better riders if they made different choices. Not, again, that anyone should feel obligated to learn to ride a horse like a pro anymore than I ought feel obligated to learn how to make souffle like a pro (which, while I like souffle, I couldn't care less if I know how to make one from scratch, but I very much care if I know how to make up a horse from scratch), but if one is talking that talk, the article notes a few ways to also walk the walk.


    The good news is that, if somehow you climb over a certain threshold competence hump, riding is a hobby that can pay for itself. You can make up flip horses and you can give up your ammy card and get paid to ride other people's horses. It's not easy but it can happen.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
    Location
    down the road from bar.ka
    Posts
    31,864

    Default

    Eventers look DOWN on you if you have nice stuff? REALLY?

    Jeesh, don't tell the top level Pros who have nice stuff.

    And if you buy 30+ stalls every competition year after year? You will get better stall location then a 1 or 2 horse exhibitor competing 2 or 3 times a year in everything from Ayrabs to QHs. Always been that way and always will.

    There is no conspiracy against the small outfit or single horse exhibitor, it's economics.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2003
    Posts
    4,875

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by meupatdoes View Post

    However, the article had a baseline of people who already owned a horse and were buying it matching boots, or people who were buying upper level horses and no lessons instead of cheap horses and lots of lessons.

    The article was admittedly about better allocation of money that was already there.
    I think where she confuses the issue is where she talks about horse crazy kids and the dream of being a professional trainer and having all the "stuff."

    That, combined with the fact that a lot of working students are horseless by circumstance, and you end up with this--if you could just RIDE BETTER you could have it all.

    There are a lot of ways to get to ride better. Some are financial, some are motivation, some are sheer luck.

    Personally, as the human version of an overgrown pony, I will buy my horse the matching boots-- because I enjoy them and I enjoy her, whether riding or not. I think it's important to keep that perspective. A lot of this stuff happens between the "haves" and the "have nots," where one side tries to gain credibility over the other, when really it doesn't matter.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
    Posts
    8,804

    Default

    I don't know, I think the stuff valid is a good example of choices. Again, not everyone wants to leave no stone unturned in the quest to become a better rider.

    But imagine two dressage novices:

    One spends $20k on the fanciest young friesan she can find, with the best bloodlines, keeps him at one of the more expensive boarding barns in the area, and plans to take one lesson a month or so. She reads lots of books and posts on COTH a lot. This person is never going to get anywhere. She probably likes her horse a whole lot and enjoys him immensely whether or not she can really ride him at all, but she is not going to learn to ride.

    Someone else has a 14.3 QH and takes three lessons a week on it, some of which she works off. Learns to install 2'6" courses and servicable if by no means fancy third level dressage, from scratch, and onto a not particularly gifted horse. At this point they are already riding better than the friesan owner in the above paragraph ever will. Other boarders at the barn may even start offering her rides when they go away on vacation, or asking her to hop on for ten minutes if their horse is giving them trouble ....and away she goes.

    At some point the article is saying that the first paragraph with the friesan is kind of a "matching boots" philosophy. Both of those people have money to keep a horse and buy it extras. One of them is really learning to ride.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
    Location
    down the road from bar.ka
    Posts
    31,864

    Default

    Somebody on here has posted they have a 30ish brother who is still planning his life around the moment NASCAR comes knocking to give him a ride because he deserves it...

    Same can be said of all those not offered a full ride scholarship to college based on high school achievements or those college athletes looking at a phone that never rings on draft day.
    Or all those actors waiting tables.

    Just not always going to get what you want in life. You have to be flexible and keep other options in mind to stay close to whatever sport or field you are passionate about.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
    Posts
    8,804

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by findeight View Post
    Somebody on here has posted they have a 30ish brother who is still planning his life around the moment NASCAR comes knocking to give him a ride because he deserves it...

    Same can be said of all those not offered a full ride scholarship to college based on high school achievements or those college athletes looking at a phone that never rings on draft day.
    Or all those actors waiting tables.

    Just not always going to get what you want in life.
    Well obviously if you just wait for the USEF to name you to the team, nothing will happen.

    However, it is possible to scratch away in the trenches until you can at least earn enough riding other people's horses that you can train up your own fancy one. Possibly you will even keep your clients long enough that you can make THEIR horses fancy too. Then you'll have a whole string of fancy ones to ride, many of which will not even be on your bill.

    You may not be riding for the USET, but you can certainly attain a level of competence and ride a quality of horse that is far beyond the average hobbyist.

    People go, oh, blah blah blah, I want a nice horse too! I want to be able to afford lessons! I want a variety of horses to ride!
    OK. Get up at 5am, ride three of the other boarders' horses in your barn before your real job, come home, shower, go to your real job, come home, go back to barn, ride two more and teach a lesson, ride yours at 10pm. Spend your 'stall' (ie, what you can afford in board) on flips until one comes along that is nice enough you can't replace it. Spend your Sundays from 9am to 7pm teaching three or four lessons and riding five or six and lessoning on yours. Wash rinse repeat. You will eventually be sitting on a $100,000 horse if you do this long enough.
    Livin' the dream, baby.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2003
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    10,880

    Default

    I do think the "if you have limited funds, what you are spending those fund on" is an important point in this article. There is a lot of truth in it. If you want to buy your horse 8 pairs of boots to rotate, and are sacrificing lessons/clinics to do it, well, your priorities are probably not to become the best rider you can or make your horse into the best it can be.

    If your priority is to have fun...more power to you. Buy ever thing that turns your head.

    It is a reality, however, that even one horse at a small, moderately priced facility is a stretch for some people. Those people either need to realign their goals...or win the lottery.

    You do have to have some amount of money to do this sport at all. The kid in the single parent family that makes $30k a year probably isn't going to find the opportunities to ever ride enough or lesson enough to be able to make it into a WS program that will give them the base to become a solid pro. They might bemoan the fact, but it is what it is.
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,417

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by meupatdoes View Post
    But imagine two dressage novices:

    One spends $20k on the fanciest young friesan she can find, with the best bloodlines, keeps him at one of the more expensive boarding barns in the area, and plans to take one lesson a month or so. She reads lots of books and posts on COTH a lot. This person is never going to get anywhere. She probably likes her horse a whole lot and enjoys him immensely whether or not she can really ride him at all, but she is not going to learn to ride.

    Someone else has a 14.3 QH and takes three lessons a week on it, some of which she works off. Learns to install 2'6" courses and servicable if by no means fancy third level dressage, from scratch, and onto a not particularly gifted horse. At this point they are already riding better than the friesan owner in the above paragraph ever will. Other boarders at the barn may even start offering her rides when they go away on vacation, or asking her to hop on for ten minutes if their horse is giving them trouble ....and away she goes.

    At some point the article is saying that the first paragraph with the friesan is kind of a "matching boots" philosophy. Both of those people have money to keep a horse and buy it extras. One of them is really learning to ride.
    Yes, but the 14.3 QH needs to be at the barn where folks can appreciate the sow's ear to silk purse transformation.

    That becomes less and less likely as you move from eventing to dressage to hunter/jumper world.

    I have lived this experience. When I have had my own Nothing Fancy But Broke and Correct beast at the little barns I liked and could afford, the odds were still against my being discovered.

    What I saw instead was

    People assumed the horse was "just good," not that any horse could be made good or that I could teach them to make their own horse as good.

    People didn't know or care what I was doing (which was probably appropriate.)

    People didn't know better from worse other than the horse being pretty or obedient.

    Those who did see what I did at shows were already tied into their barn and their pro, whether or not their horse and they were improving. (That was probably appropriate, too.)

    Even if you can train and ride the socks off of something, you have to find a way to get in front of people who know better or want better and can pay for it.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
    Posts
    8,804

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    Yes, but the 14.3 QH needs to be at the barn where folks can appreciate the sow's ear to silk purse transformation.

    That becomes less and less likely as you move from eventing to dressage to hunter/jumper world.

    I have lived this experience. When I have had my own Nothing Fancy But Broke and Correct beast at the little barns I liked and could afford, the odds were still against my being discovered.

    What I saw instead was

    People assumed the horse was "just good," not that any horse could be made good or that I could teach them to make their own horse as good.

    People didn't know or care what I was doing (which was probably appropriate.)

    People didn't know better from worse other than the horse being pretty or obedient.

    Those who did see what I did at shows were already tied into their barn and their pro, whether or not their horse and they were improving. (That was probably appropriate, too.)

    Even if you can train and ride the socks off of something, you have to find a way to get in front of people who know better or want better and can pay for it.
    People will pretty much never come up to you and say, "I notice you trained up that other horse great."
    I labored under this delusion for a long time, but it just does not happen.

    There are always people on craigslist who post they are looking for someone to help them. Usually they have a grade horse and need help with "go steer and stop." Often the horse has some issues and the tack is less than ideal. The arena is the size of a maintenance shed, the footing is essentially a continuation of the driveway, and the horse is standing there wearing relic tack from the seventies giving you the hairy eyeball. So you put a rope halter on and wave aflag and see if it is at least semi-responsive or flat bonkers. And proceed.

    Very little to none of people coming up at a show and saying "I saw how nicely you rode that one," is involved.

    However, grade horses with issues and their owners who want to learn how to ride them pay for lessons and prorides and thus board for your own. They are generally EXTREMELY grateful when someone will help them. They tell their friends with other bonkers horses and you go get them to go with all four on the floor, and eventually get an income stream that pays for your own horse and lessons. In order to pay for one rated show, you have to ride 50 horses who will never go to a rated show in their lives. None of those 50 are people who walked up and wondered would you ride this nice prospect for them.

    Livin' the dream, baby.

    Now suddenly when "access to multiple horses" and "making your hobby pay for itself so you can afford board and lessons to make up a really fancy one yourself" and "really learning to train, not just ride" involves riding craigslist grade horses in bare bones facilities and relic tack, and convincing them to not leap in the air sideways everytime a leaf blows across the roof,d doing all of this by yourself at 5 am in 20 degrees, the whole "I'm not made of money but I really want to learn to riiiiiide, I would do annnnythingggg"doesn't sound quite so appealing.

    Much easier to wait until the boarder at your barn with the nice prospect notices what a fabulous job you did with your own ottb and says, dear, would you do me a favor and ride mine? And it will be green, but not remedial, because those are f*ckin' scary sometimes, not gonna lie, and then you will kindly put a month's worth of rides on and then it will be ready for the baby greens. Someday one of them will notice! Keep waitin'.

    Are any of the people who thought the article was offensive or who complained they don't have enough money to pay board and lessons going to start reading craigslist now for training customers that could get them started down the path? I'm going to guess not.

    The article did mention it is much less glamorous than most people think.
    Last edited by meupatdoes; Mar. 15, 2013 at 08:51 AM.



Similar Threads

  1. Working Student
    By LoveLongManes in forum Off Course
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Mar. 6, 2012, 10:50 PM
  2. What do you look for in a working student?
    By Smarnell in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: Feb. 23, 2011, 08:02 PM
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: Sep. 26, 2010, 04:20 AM
  4. working student
    By TazBear in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Aug. 26, 2010, 08:56 AM
  5. Working Student in CA...
    By Carax in forum Dressage
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: Jul. 8, 2010, 11:05 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •