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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    19,580

    Default

    Think about getting a Lyme titer too.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2008
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Posts
    42

    Default sore

    He is sore, or for a better term...lame. I see more than one site of lameness, which is probably why the poor guy can't provide a good old head bob. The soft footing makes it less likely to produce a bob. a circle (tight) would tell you much more. I would love to see him at least walk (forwardly) on a firm footing and then trot the same on video. I can see a vet wanting to wait 'till he is lamer, to make the diagnosis easier, they do that all the time. He is a trier, so if you keep going he will compensate, as in the video, and the lameness will get worse. The swelling could be soft from not moving while he rests, and that isn't something that the vet will address. It is the symptom, not the cause. Sweeling in the ankles is too broad a term. Is it back of the pastern, above the fetlock? A bubble on the front of the fetlock. Does he wince on a flex....there is a reason that posting on the boards is not the forum. What your horse is doing takes more effort than a simple trot. There is a reason. I would look for it, nose to toes, before moving on.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct. 30, 2009
    Posts
    1,944

    Default

    Left stifle.
    "I've spent most of my life riding horses. The rest I've just wasted". - Anonymous


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2000
    Location
    Southern Pines, N.C.
    Posts
    11,642

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beverley View Post
    That is a sore horse with a heart of gold. I'll take him. He's yelling at you with his body language and his tail, but bless 'im, he's trying his best despite the discomfort.

    Turn him out, let him down completely, if it were me it'd be at least two months, three or four even better, six not too much. If he has shoes on, pull them and ensure a good trim and then just let those feet grow a good 8 weeks before trimming again. Tincture of time is what he needs, not radiographs or messing with angles or anything else. When you see him frolicking like a pain free horse in the field- then start back with him slowly. He'll be a heckuva horse for the long run if you don't rush things.
    WHAT A NICE HORSE! He is trying his damndest to do what he is asked. Unfortunately he is CRIPPLED and cannot physically do it. He looked like he was trying to tie up, and yet the rider kept after him to canter. I hope that he was made to keep going just to video his condition. I cannot even imagine actually working a horse who is contorting his body just to please his rider. I could not even watch the whole video. I hurt, just watching him.

    I would start with a really good chiro and deep tissue massage. When a horse is that sore, his muscles will spasm when he tries to use them. Once you have been assured that his skeleton and muscles are working correctly, then carefully supervised turn out is best. By that, I mean that he should be looked at every couple of days, walked or jogged to see if he is getting better or worse. If he is worse after 3 - 4 weeks, then he needs a complete going over at a major vet clinic.
    "I used to have money, now I have horses."


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2011
    Posts
    520

    Default

    I would definitely say he is sore.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2006
    Location
    Southeast Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,705

    Default

    No words of wisdom, but I bet if he had his head lower, he'd win all the western pleasure classes.....


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2007
    Location
    Down on the Farm
    Posts
    3,056

    Default

    First you address the issues that are glaring back at you before you go to a chiro, or have a major workup done at a clinic. Start with the simple fixes first.

    There are so many horses that come off the track with arthritis/damage in their hocks. They will move like this if maintenance isn't kept up (which is what I suspect). He looks like the classic horse with sore hocks, compensating the best he can and now it's showing up in his ankles (another classic sign). His back is probably sore as heck (due to sore hocks).

    Yes, I believe a chiro would help him, however a chiro isn't going to fix his sore hocks. So start with a good evaluation of those and move on from there.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar. 15, 2013
    Posts
    207

    Default

    I to am thinking stifle, but I rode a horse once upon a time that would move like this. We called it a tranter (front trots and back canters or vice versa), he wound up getting checked out by a vet. He had back issues, stifle issues and hock issues. Hocks are what caused it to get worse. If you watch this horse in the video watch his hind end. You see his hindquarters are getting tenser and tenser? And he doesn't seem to want to "take percussion" for lack of a better term. He is bracing himself for pain, in other words. Please get his hocks checked out! Him overcompensating like he is will eventually put a strain on his front.



    ok hold up just watched the video Dealers First Trot. Please have his stifles checked! If you watch, the trot video makes it easier to see. He is dragging his back toes more than the fronts. He is not daisy cutting at all, since I mostly see his backs doing it. He needs to be checked. What I would do is get a vet out, get his hocks/stifles/back and I keep seeing something going on with the shoulders to in this other video, his shoulders need checking also. Then when you find out what the issues are ask you vet about having a chiro come out and see him. It may help him out so much. His tail swishing is because he is in pain, you can see it just by watching him move in both videos. I would not have a rider on him until these issues were addressed, and then what I would do is to start building his muscles from the ground. Teach him to collect himself if he is able to do it. If it is his hind end being weak hill work will help. But first and foremost ask the vet to check hocks/stifles/back/shoulders.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov. 11, 2001
    Location
    Pennsylvania,Zone ll
    Posts
    2,210

    Default

    In my experience the best thing to do for a horse this sore is to let him down for six months...eventually out in a large paddock. He has so many things hurting him, it is a waste of a vet's time and your money to try to diagnose him now. After Six months many of his compensatory lameness issues will have receeded and you will start to see what the main issue is. THEN a vet can help you to proceed from there. This takes time. If you are in a hurry, I don't know what to tell you. I never hurried with horses off the track and watching the compensatory lamenesses subside was a real education.
    "Over the Hill?? What Hill, Where?? I don't remember any hill!!!" Favorite Tee Shirt


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct. 23, 2011
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    138

    Default

    I wish I could really understand what was being said at the end of the video...

    However, spending a lot of time around western pleasure horses, this horse would be perfect!!

    Seriously though, it's hard for me to tell what's going on here. I hope that he's not in pain, but I've seen a number of horses that have been required to move like this their entire lives. I could definitely see it as being a habit, too.

    And I also really wish they would have taken video of him moving in both directions, but maybe this is the only direction he does this "gait"?
    "Life ain't always beautiful, but it's a beautiful ride."



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