The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 45
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
    Location
    Port Charlotte, FL
    Posts
    3,447

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by grayarabpony View Post
    Actually Rick needs to go ahead and get lost. There are no charlatans or snake oil salesmen or women posting on the hoof care threads at this time.
    Another lie.
    Last edited by Tom Bloomer; Mar. 16, 2013 at 08:03 AM. Reason: to remove personal attack


    3 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2011
    Location
    Island of Heart Surrounded by the Sea of Intuition
    Posts
    212

    Default

    airhorse: she is currently in a dry lot with NO grass. She was previously in a pasture that had barely any grass.
    The Love for a Horse is just as Complicated as the Love for another Human being, If you have never Loved a Horse you will Never Understand!!!



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2011
    Location
    Island of Heart Surrounded by the Sea of Intuition
    Posts
    212

    Default

    In my experience with laminitis some horses do not have rotation following the acute stage. That does not mean that rotation or sinking will not occur sometime later
    When I asked my vet about a follow up appointment, x-rays in a few weeks and blood work he did not seem to think this was necessary. This is one of the reasons I am researching for my self and asking for others experiences.

    So far so good. You have not indicated whether the horse was shod or barefoot prior to the laminitis.
    She was shod on all four with steel shoes.


    I'm having a problem reconciling the history as you have presented it.

    First you state the horse is overweight. Then you speak of putting the horse "back into work" as though the horse was previously in work when the laminitis occurred. How can a horse that is working be overweight?
    I just bought this horse in November. She was very overweight when I bought her and I had gotten her to a healthy weight (or so I thought). Per vets instructions since this bout with laminitis I have decreased and switched her grain but I feel that she is under weight. Since I bought her she has had training rides 2 times a week from my trainer and then 2-3 times a week from me. However in the past month the weather has been terrible with rain and ice and so the most she would have been ridden was 2x a week if that. I believe that the decrease / no work is possibly the cause of the laminits.

    commend you new interest in horsemanship. However, if you want to be a real horseman, it will be the horse teaching you, not you teaching the horse. Part of that involves you learning to interpret the horses behavior in regards to its comfort - both physical and mental. Your horse already knows how to speak horse. You need to listen to what the horse is saying, especially when the horse says yes and no.
    I am trying to use this time "off" to become a better horse person and to learn more about my horse ( on the ground and connect with her!) As you say listen to what she is telling me, instead of just ignoring her until she is ridable. I think I fail sometimes as a horse person in that I don't do enough listening. But no one is perfect and maybe this bad circumstance can help me slow down and listen.

    Seems you are very impatient and want to get back to riding and jumping. Perhaps you could borrow somebody else's horse to quench your thirst for this activity until you've learned to quantify your horse's opinion on its recovery
    Of course I want to be riding again! Thankfully I have an amazing trainer who has several horse that I can ride whenever I would like. Through the reading and research I have done on my own I also feel that 8 weeks is to soon to be jumping again. However my vet stated that I should be riding again in 6 weeks and jumping in 8 weeks. Again this is why I am asking for other experience.

    I guess these post have made me realize that I am not second guessing myself so much as second guessing my vet's opinion. I tend to feel that a licensed vet knows much more than I do and I should listen to him but I feel that he may be rushing my horse and is not doing all he can to make sure my horse stays sound and this doesn't happen again. I will push for more x-rays, blood work and listen to what my horse tells me is to much work.
    The Love for a Horse is just as Complicated as the Love for another Human being, If you have never Loved a Horse you will Never Understand!!!



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2006
    Posts
    10,033

    Default

    OP there's nothing wrong with questioning any vet's opinion. Even if she hadn't rotated the fact that she got laminitis at all is no small deal, and it certainly could continue or recur. I presume she's insulin resistant and that's why she suffered this bout of laminitis?

    fwiw I think your vet is rushing things too. I'm amazed he suggested jumping in 8 weeks. Perhaps it would be OK if she had no further problems but laminitis is not like a stone bruise. Metabolically based laminitis is always waiting to rear its ugly head, and until you can be sure you can manage her well enough to keep the laminitis from reoccurring, I'd take things slowly with her.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2006
    Location
    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
    Posts
    3,836

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by grayarabpony View Post
    Actually Rick needs to go ahead and get lost. There are no charlatans or snake oil salesmen or women posting on the hoof care threads at this time.
    Know the truth and the truth will set you free.
    "No women posting on the hoof care threads at this time" ROTFLMAO! I bet that will come as news to those distaff members of society that read this. Or perhaps as you so routinely evidence when replying on said threads, you don't know what you are talking/writing about....


    All my love,
    Rick


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    5,120

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Crazy4aOTTB View Post
    And since you mentioned the turning tight my barn owner did mention that the only time she took an "off" step today was turning tight to go into the pasture. So I will have to be on the look out for that as well. But she seemed great today on a straight line.
    This would have me still concerned as the very first sign of laminitis I have noticed in the past have been that walking on eggshells look and it shows up first on the turns. If I saw that in a horse that had a known history of laminitis, I'd not be too keen on going back to work, and would be still treating it as a laminitis case until vet/farrier could see them. When my IR horse (before we figured out he was IR) had his first laminitis episode, we confined him on soft bedding and did not walk or turnout. I thought you wanted to keep them pretty quiet and not moving around as that would make the rotation worse? My horse stayed in his stall and matted overhang for at least a month, had the taped on foam for his feet at first, then Soft-ride boots, and once he was stable enough, we went to pour in pads and shoes. We did followup x-rays to look for any further rotation/sinking but I can't recall what the timeframe was -- maybe 4 to 6 weeks after the initial acute laminitis?

    I wouldn't be in a hurry to go back to work and I would sure want the horse looking solidly sound -- if turning is still painful, I'd want to address that. There's a reason why the vets have you turn the horse in small circles when examining.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2011
    Location
    Island of Heart Surrounded by the Sea of Intuition
    Posts
    212

    Default

    I presume she's insulin resistant and that's why she suffered this bout of laminitis?
    I am not sure. This is another reason I am questioning my vet. I need to figure out exactly why this happened. It is hard to prevent something if you don't know what the cause is! I feel like she should be tested to see and I am assuming blood work needs to be done? He hasn't given me a cause and I am concerned my vet is not more concerned lol. I don't believe it is just a weight issue, considering I started working on slimming her down as soon as I got her. Also the pasture she was in was over grazed and not much grass & she has not had any other health issues that I am aware of the could have possibly caused this.
    The Love for a Horse is just as Complicated as the Love for another Human being, If you have never Loved a Horse you will Never Understand!!!



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2006
    Location
    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
    Posts
    3,836

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Crazy4aOTTB View Post
    I am not sure. This is another reason I am questioning my vet. I need to figure out exactly why this happened.
    Though her body condition offers a major clue. don't overlook the effect of hormonal changes coming into and during the spring and later this year, the fall.
    It is hard to prevent something if you don't know what the cause is!
    If the cause turns out to be hormonal changes, there is little you will be able to do about it. That said, there are ancillary things such as making sure she is and stays 'fit'; limiting her exposure and time of day in pasture; keeping her diet low in NSC's; if she is diagnosed with any metabolic issues that can be controlled with meds; making sure the meds and dosage(s) are precise/correct;
    keeping her feet correctly trimmed/shod; whether barefoot or shod, insuring that the correct orthosis is in place; having a back-up hoofcare protocol on hand to implement at the first signs of laminitis/founder; not relying on nameless, faceless internet strangers, particularly those with no credentials and questionable experience, for help and advice.
    I feel like she should be tested to see and I am assuming blood work needs to be done? He hasn't given me a cause and I am concerned my vet is not more concerned lol.
    Perhaps it is time(or past time) for a second opinion....
    I don't believe it is just a weight issue, considering I started working on slimming her down as soon as I got her.
    As noted, there may be many factors involved, each one adding to the 'cascade' of triggers.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2007
    Location
    down south
    Posts
    5,060

    Default

    My guys slight rotation was not from insulin. He was over weight even tinwork because I was that horse owner that goes ohhhh food. Lol. I've learned over the years and even though he was on just a little bit of grain, meaning like 2 handfuls, he didn't need it. He breathes and gets fat because we do have enough pasture and free choice round bale.

    My guy twisted his shoe running around and the nails went in his hoof. We believe because of being sore in that hoof he over compensated on the other hoof and being overweight, like a 7 on the scale, it was just to much for his coffin bone. It was only in one hoof not both and it was the one that was unhurt and we found out pretty quick. He never was lame. I just noticed while riding his knee would give out a few times on the one side. Vet thought he was having a shooting pain at times that would cause him to go ouch. We quickly xrayed fetlock, knee, and hooves and found the one hoof had the issue. Even without it being an on going issue my vet has taken it very slowly with plenty of xrays to make sure we are on the right track. With him and my great farrier the coffin bone has corrected itself and stabilized. Look at both hoof xrays you can't tell the difference or even know he had a problem but like I said it was slight I think 3 degrees if I remember correctly maybe 2. Take your time. Get the bloodwork to make sure and have those feet xrayed on and off for a few months to make sure.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2006
    Location
    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
    Posts
    3,836

    Default

    Since it appears that none of the forum hoof dilettantes appear ready, willing or able to explain to the OP why her horse is evidencing pain when turning in a tight circle, I'll give it a go. You are seeing the pain response because the laminae are not yet either non-inflammed and/or, most probably, not yet tightly interdigitated. This causes pain when the hoof is planted on the ground and the horse turns away from a straight line. eg: the hoof capsule remains planted in a straight line orientation while the coffin bone rotates away from that alignment because the laminae are injured and have lost/lose their ability to keep the coffin bone and hoof capsule properly united.
    Here's a simple exercise you can perform on yourself to give you an idea of what is occurring. First, cup your hands slightly then slide the fingers of one hand in between the fingers of your other hand, long axis to long axis. That is interdigitation. Next, tense your wrists, hands, fingers so the fingers are tightly interlocked/held in place. This approximates the correct status of the dermal(sensitive laminae originating from the laminar corium on thecoffin bone surface) and epidermal laminae(insensitive laminae originating from the inner surface of the stratum medium) of the hoof. Now, rotate your right(or left but not both)hand up or down. If you've done the prep correctly, your left hand will follow.
    Next, relax the tension between the fingers and repeat the one hand rotation motion. What happens? If you've done the prep correctly, the fingers will lose their long axis axial alignment. This is exactly what happens when the horse turns tightly on a compromised hoof.
    Here's a treatise, with photos on the subject of laminitis. Its worth the read.
    http://www.laminitisclinic.org/Expla...hapter%201.pdf

    If nothing else, a 'take-away' from this presentation is or should be that so long as your horse exhibits even a minor display of the symptoms, she is not ready for 'regular work'. Further, putting your horse over fences, especially in the near term, compounds the probability of resurrecting the inflammation and causing further damage. That said, it would be disingenuous/remiss/unprofessional of me not to point out that as is true regarding most everything equid, It Depends.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2011
    Location
    Island of Heart Surrounded by the Sea of Intuition
    Posts
    212

    Default

    Thank you Rick Burton for your explanation of why she experiences pain when turning. I tried your example at my desk on break and a few people were looking at me a little funny lol. I looked over your link as well but decided to print it out and have a good read once I get home. seems very detailed! Exactly what I need to learn more about the hoof and the hoof structures! I also checked out the Blackburn Forge web page as well. all very good reads!

    I in no way will consider working with my horse on the ground or riding until she is completely sound. Meaning pain free in turning as well as walking straight. I have also spoken to my trainer about getting a second opinion from the vet she uses as well. I plan to take things very slow with her and I am thinking months not weeks!
    The Love for a Horse is just as Complicated as the Love for another Human being, If you have never Loved a Horse you will Never Understand!!!



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
    Location
    Port Charlotte, FL
    Posts
    3,447

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Crazy4aOTTB View Post
    When I asked my vet about a follow up appointment, x-rays in a few weeks and blood work he did not seem to think this was necessary. This is one of the reasons I am researching for my self and asking for others experiences.
    You did not indicate whether or not the vet pulled blood work initially. In my experience this is SOP with every vet I have worked with on first time laminitis cases. If the vet did not pull blood work I would want an explanation as to the medical basis of the laminitis diagnosis and the medical basis of the prognosis. SOP is to determine the cause. If the cause is assumed to be metabolic, that assumption deserves to be tested and confirmed or ruled out.

    These questions have been addressed already. If not, then you may want to consider that not all vets are up to date with laminitis diagnosis/treatment protocols, i.e. I would not expect a small animal vet to be well versed in this area, but an equine vet should be current with their continuing education in this area.

    She was shod on all four with steel shoes.
    That might explain why the acute phase of laminitis showed no initial rotation, though I have seen the same in barefoot horses that showed no initial rotation and then a month later showed significant rotation without any obvious clinical symptoms of another acute laminitis episode.

    I just bought this horse in November. She was very overweight when I bought her and I had gotten her to a healthy weight (or so I thought). Per vets instructions since this bout with laminitis I have decreased and switched her grain but I feel that she is under weight. Since I bought her she has had training rides 2 times a week from my trainer and then 2-3 times a week from me. However in the past month the weather has been terrible with rain and ice and so the most she would have been ridden was 2x a week if that. I believe that the decrease / no work is possibly the cause of the laminits.
    Did your vet do a body condition score on the horse? If so, what is it? Did the vet evaluate your horse's diet and suggest changes or express agreement with what you are doing?

    I am trying to use this time "off" to become a better horse person and to learn more about my horse ( on the ground and connect with her!) As you say listen to what she is telling me, instead of just ignoring her until she is ridable. I think I fail sometimes as a horse person in that I don't do enough listening. But no one is perfect and maybe this bad circumstance can help me slow down and listen.
    May the force be with you.

    Of course I want to be riding again! Thankfully I have an amazing trainer who has several horse that I can ride whenever I would like. Through the reading and research I have done on my own I also feel that 8 weeks is to soon to be jumping again. However my vet stated that I should be riding again in 6 weeks and jumping in 8 weeks. Again this is why I am asking for other experience.
    I think that perhaps there may be some reason for the vet's optimistic prognosis. I certainly hope that it goes this way, but I would expect the vet to followup and modify the prognosis if the results are different than predicted.

    I guess these post have made me realize that I am not second guessing myself so much as second guessing my vet's opinion.
    I only have your recollection of the details to go on, so I can't second guess your vet's opinion as I haven't heard it straight from the vet.

    I'm sure there are a whole bunch of things that the vet said that you cannot recall word for word. Fortunately there will be no test on that material and most vets will happily review their case notes with an owner over the phone.

    I tend to feel that a licensed vet knows much more than I do and I should listen to him but I feel that he may be rushing my horse and is not doing all he can to make sure my horse stays sound and this doesn't happen again.
    Again, unless you recorded everything the vet said at the examination or took copious notes, I would be very surprised if you "got it all." I'm sure you were under significant emotional stress at the time, as I would be stressed if it was my horse. There is nothing wrong with asking a vet to review their findings and prognosis.

    I will push for more x-rays, blood work and listen to what my horse tells me is to much work.
    If your horse does not show further clinical symptoms you might not "need' further x-rays. If your farrier asks for followup x-rays at the next shoeing appointment your vet should provide them. They should be treating laminitis as a team and following up with each other and keeping you updated, but you may have to ask for updates and don't quibble about the cost as their time spent following up and communicating deserves compensation.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2006
    Location
    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
    Posts
    3,836

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Crazy4aOTTB View Post
    Thank you Rick Burton for your explanation of why she experiences pain when turning. I tried your example at my desk on break and a few people were looking at me a little funny lol. I looked over your link as well but decided to print it out and have a good read once I get home. seems very detailed! ...
    It is said that "a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step." You, "Grasshopper" have begun that journey and have now taken more than a single step. May the road always rise to meet you. and, as a friend of mine from 'Down Under" would offer, "Mind how ya go now..."


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2006
    Posts
    10,033

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Crazy4aOTTB View Post
    I in no way will consider working with my horse on the ground or riding until she is completely sound. Meaning pain free in turning as well as walking straight. I have also spoken to my trainer about getting a second opinion from the vet she uses as well. I plan to take things very slow with her and I am thinking months not weeks!
    I actually disagree with this. Movement is your horse's friend at this point, since she is fine in a straight line. You need to find out WHY she got laminitis (and judging from her weight and time of year, she's probably insulin resistant) and address that. The test for insulin resistance is not foolproof, depending on which one you use; personally I'd rule out other things (mechanical, Cushing's, breaking into the grain room) and if it's not those things assume insulin resistance. Cushing's is more likely to affect elderly horses btw. Mechanical laminitis could occur if your horse has very thin soles for example.

    If I were you I'd get a T4 run (IR horses in laminitic mode are often low in T4). My vet suggested this when my pony was laminitic and her T4 was indeed low, so I gave her L-thryo. If she is low in T4 supplementation may help her lose weight, and may help some of the metabolic issues involved with insulin resistance. Most owners just use T4 in danger times for IR laminitis, spring and fall.

    My pony found immediate relief from having her toes backed up (a long toe of any sort is extra uncomfortable to a laminitic horse) and being handwalked. She was still in some pain until then, turning around.

    Your vet may be too cavalier but I think not doing anything with her at all (unless she walks around a good bit in her dry lot) is not a good decision either, since she is sound on a straight line. Just my experience with one horse and mho. I started out walking the pony for 5 minutes a day in boots and double pads (as a precaution more than anything), and when she was comfortable turning I let her go bare. She typically has a lot of sole, at least 15mm and often 20, so she's been barefoot most of her life anyway. Your horse has shoes and pads so she should have adequate sole protection.

    Ice boots are a good thing to have on hand, if your horse's feet feel warm and/or you feel a strong pulse in her leg. Icing from the knee down can help to keep laminitis under control.
    Last edited by grayarabpony; Mar. 15, 2013 at 11:05 AM.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2007
    Location
    down south
    Posts
    5,060

    Default

    Also look into this after the vet does bw
    http://www.equinemedsurg.com/faqir.html

    My pony is on it and is on pasture and round bale and has lost 100lbs since i started about 4 months ago. It has done a great job with him.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2004
    Location
    Guanajuato, GTO, Mexico
    Posts
    2,544

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rabicon View Post
    Also look into this after the vet does bw
    http://www.equinemedsurg.com/faqir.html

    My pony is on it and is on pasture and round bale and has lost 100lbs since i started about 4 months ago. It has done a great job with him.
    Is this the ONLY thing that is different? Same hay? Same amount of time at same pasture? Same amount of exercise? Same ambient temperatures? What was comparison of weather when pony was fat/bad or thinner/better? No other changes in medications, feed or supplements?



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2007
    Location
    down south
    Posts
    5,060

    Default

    He has no change in feed, he gets wheat bran just to appease him when the others are eating. He has been severly overweight IMO, pushing an 8, for years. I've tried no feed, no round bales limiting turnout nothing helped. He stays out 24/7 on pasture and round bale unless weather is really bad. He may go in at night once or twice every couple weeks. Changed nothing in is routine when I started this supplement. No meds at all just this supplement and he has lost 100 lbs but still needs to lose probably 50 to 100 more lol. He's a fatty but he is still losing so Im keeping him on it.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2007
    Location
    down south
    Posts
    5,060

    Default

    Just to add this pony has always been overweight even in work. He packed on more pounds when he was retired 3 years ago to a lameness we could not figure out. Went to university and did multiple test and couldn't figure it out. He now looks sound and will start working again starting today but up till now he has had no excersise at all except moving around the pasture. He started looking sound about a year ago but he was so overweight I didn't want a rider on him till I could get some off. Tried lunging back then and working I'm but he seemed to gain weight instead of lose lol. So the past 9 months he has pretty much just been a pasture puff. 4 months ago I saw this stuff at the feed store and owner said people using it love it and says it works wonders so I decided to try it. 4 months 100lbs off doing nothing and no changes to anything so now he is at the point that I and the vet feel the rider weight is not to much for him and he is going to start back training. Im hoping with work and this supplement he will drop even more .
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
    Location
    Alberta's bread basket
    Posts
    1,665

    Default

    OP - you have some super knowledge here in the posts with both Rick Burton and Tom Bloomer. Both are highly qualified farriers and they know feet inside-out, backwards and upside down.

    And Katy Watts brings up very good points with her questions, um, directed to another poster, but still applicable to you and your mare. So try to take some time and answer each of them for yourself. It sometimes helps to buy a book and write them down and then sort of keep a horse daily diary thing. It will help you pinpoint the apparent triggers for your horse.

    Ambient weather quite often WILL play a role in laminitis. A sudden drop from above-freezing temperatures to those down into the negatives will quite often bring on a bout. It would be wise to wrap legs if you know how to do it in such a way so as to not cause a bowed tendon. Otherwise, get a wise and proficient person to teach you, because a bowed tendon can be just as difficult to deal with as chronic or recurring laminitis, and indeed can often set off another bout of laminitis! As Katy mentions through her questions posed to you, feeding is uber important. So, what feed changes happened? Even teeny-tiny miniscule changes done at the right time of year can set a sensitive horse off. I might suggest that even if your horse actually isn't insulin resistant, you should probably treat your horse now like he is and feed and manage horsie accordingly. His Management now means more effort and work on your part, but a happier horsie in the long run, and results in fewer future interruptions to riding, or, frankly, losing your horse altogether. From what I've learned from Dr. Eleanor Kellon, a horse can be insulin resistant and in varying degrees of such, but does not have necessarily Cushings; however, a Cushings horse is always insulin resistant. I do suggest you check out Eleanor Kellon's web site. She's a leading expert on IR, Cushings and metabolic syndromes.

    Another thing I learned - feeding in small, frequent meals does a laminitic horse better than 2 large feeds a day. Just like a human diabetic, you want a laminitic horse - any laminitic horse, irrespective to whether she has IR or Cushings or not - to have a steady-eddie blood sugar. 3 feeds are better than 2, 4 is even better, 5 is even better yet! Going without feed for a prolonged period of time can send them into a spiral that could be very difficult to get them out of. I always have fed 3x a day, but my sick mare now gets 5 smaller feedings spread out over 16 hours.

    Take the time to learn what makes grass and hays go into a high sugar state and learn how to avoid them. Get your hay tested before feeding. You can't tell by looking at it whether it is low sugar. If in doubt, soak.

    Tom mentioned - did you have blood work drawn? In my own current circumstances, my mare is not IR, but we still pulled blood to check everything the vet could think of as to WHY she reacted to her vaccine the way she did. So, did you have blood work drawn? This is a relatively inexpensive test to have done and might solve a lot of questions. Specifically get magnesium levels checked, your horse's kidney and liver functions checked and a random blood sugar. Your vet might suggest other things. If you think your horse isn't inflammatory any more, prove it - by getting inflammatory markers done! We thought my mare wasn't inflammatory, a month after she started her laminitic bout, until the blood work proved her inflammatory markers were still high and that was even with her being on antiinflammatory drugs. Today, 2 months after she started, the levels have fallen to normal, but she is still on antiinflammatory drugs so without those drugs her markers would actually still be high. My mare tells us she still has pain so she's not ready to be weaned off drugs. Until her pain disappears and she's been off drugs for a couple weeks with inflammatory markers staying normal while off those drugs, then and only then has the laminitis ended and healing can begin from that point. Inflammatory markers are relatively cheap to test for and are another tool for your toolbox.

    I believe it was also Tom who mentioned spring hormones. I can't recall if you said your horse was a mare or not? If your horse is a mare, then bingo. For some mares, just starting into their seasonal heat cycles can trigger a laminitic bout. Your only way of overcoming is paying particular attention to a low-sugar diet, maybe even withdrawing her from "low sugar kibble" and just going with nothing but her tested low-sugar and soaked hay. As I very quickly learned with my mare, the "low-sugar, low glycemic index" kibble made from soy protein set her off faster than you could say boo. Off soy, she is better. Also, keep track of her cycles and maybe icing her legs for a day or so when she appears to be coming in. Ask your vet if you should dose her in a pre-emptive strike with bute for a couple days. If your horse is a mare and your diary notes that her cycles could be triggering her, then it would be super important to develop a plan with your vet to deal with this because mares never go into menopause. My mare is due to foal in June. I am already discussing and developing a plan with the vet team to deal with the radical hormone shifts she is going to face the weeks just preceding to and the days following her foaling.

    Laminitis is frustrating, overwhelming, temperamental, stressful, expensive, and tricky to deal with. As someone told me - Knowledge Is Power. Yes indeed. Become a readaholic and learn from reputable sources all you can, because that's the only way your horse can stay comfortable. She relies on you for this sort of help.
    Last edited by rodawn; Mar. 15, 2013 at 06:30 PM. Reason: Re-read your 1st post, yes, you have a mare, aren't you lucky! :)
    https://www.facebook.com/MariposaSportHorses

    Practice! Patience! Persistence!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2004
    Location
    Guanajuato, GTO, Mexico
    Posts
    2,544

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rodawn View Post
    From what I've learned from Dr. Eleanor Kellon, a horse can be insulin resistant and in varying degrees of such, but does not have necessarily Cushings; however, a Cushings horse is always insulin resistant..
    From AAEP, here:
    http://www.aaep.org/health_articles_view.php?id=340

    "Not all horses with PPID are insulin resistant. This would be an additional consideration in a complete diagnostic evaluation especially if the horse or pony has laminitis."


    1 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. How can I feed a hay-less horse slowly?
    By PunkeyPony in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: Oct. 14, 2012, 01:34 AM
  2. Laminitis and the back to work protocol...
    By Mr.GMan in forum Dressage
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Dec. 7, 2011, 09:41 PM
  3. 2 weeks off. How slowly to bring back to work?
    By ElisLove in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Aug. 12, 2011, 05:31 PM
  4. Stay & See, or back away slowly?
    By randomequine in forum Off Course
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: Jan. 17, 2011, 05:34 PM
  5. Do all yearlings shed slowly?
    By retrofit in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: May. 13, 2010, 11:27 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness