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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2009
    Location
    Montreal, Qc
    Posts
    2,991

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crockpot View Post
    very high heels for whatever reason- only vet and farrier can assess that.
    It is not the first I see PRE and/or Lusi shod like that, with high heels. I think it is a breed thing.

    From diverse websites :

    - IF YOUR HORSE HAS HIGH HEELS, DO NOT LOWER THEM . ANDALUSIAN HORSES HAVE A DIFFERENT SHAPE OF FOOT THAN WARMBLOODS OR THOROUGHBREDS. IF THE FEET ARE NARROW , ASK YOUR BLACKSMITH TO PUT WIDER SHOES ON - INVITING THE FOOT TO BROADEN .
    Hoof Care
    Farriers constantly praise the Andalusian feet as ideal for their hardness, shape, condition and overall natural health. The hoof is more upright than most breeds, round and of good size. The frog is naturally set higher off the ground, thought to be a natural evolution from their marshland habitat. The heel is well pronounced and rarely underslung. Any farrier new to the breed must take care that ample heel is left. I have seen several farriers remove too much heel and lame an Andalusian. Generally the angle of the hoof is around 57 degrees. Its best to show your farrier the horse at walk and trot before he trims an Andalusian for the first time so he can see the customary high stepping action and overreach.
    A friend of mine bought a Lusi from Brezil and she came shod pretty high in her heels. She was moving beautifully.



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    5,078

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    How much are they asking? PM me if you don't mind.

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  3. #43
    Join Date
    Aug. 4, 2009
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    4,093

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    I am More concerned the rider is foolish or arrogant enough to ride without a helmet..



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    14,734

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    Quote Originally Posted by judybigredpony View Post
    I am More concerned the rider is foolish or arrogant enough to ride without a helmet..
    zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz why do folks feel the need for this ? She's not buying him.
    ... _. ._ .._. .._


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2002
    Posts
    1,628

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    Quote Originally Posted by Equibrit View Post
    zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz why do folks feel the need for this ?
    zzzzzzzzz Tell me and we'll both know. zzzzzzzzzzz



  6. #46
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2009
    Location
    Montreal, Qc
    Posts
    2,991

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    Quote Originally Posted by judybigredpony View Post
    Find something else to spend your time and money on....
    Quote Originally Posted by judybigredpony View Post
    I am More concerned the rider is foolish or arrogant enough to ride without a helmet..
    The only arrogant one here is surely not the rider in the video.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Oct. 13, 2006
    Posts
    3,505

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    Are there any judges here who can chime in on gaits?

    For his moderate level of "finished" work (not schooling), I would be willing to bet his gaits score JUST FINE.

    Likes most of these horses he doesnt scream extensions to me but I was very pleased to see he has a little bit of swing in that trot!
    ~~Member of the TB's Rule Clique ~~
    http://www.off-breed-dressage.blogspot.com/



  8. #48
    Join Date
    Dec. 10, 2006
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    190

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    Well - he's a no go - sadly.
    The vet went out to see him for a preliminary evaluation, because I was worried about that LF foot. The owner had the horse trimmed and shod, so the vet could see if what I saw was NQR was fixed with the trimming. But it is not.
    Apparently that foot naturally is turned out quite a bit and they've been trying to "fix" it by shoeing him with his foot turned in so that it looks straight. That is in turn putting presure on the outside of the hoof, causing it do deform and putting presure on the fetlock joint. Vet said that the horse will be lucky to stay sound long term for light riding. So sad because I think he was really nice otherwise and would have made a good upper level horse for me. I was just worried about soundness of that LF pastern.
    Thanks everyone for your imput. It's been good to hear everyone's opinion.
    On to choice #2.



  9. #49
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2012
    Posts
    1,692

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    Apparently that foot naturally is turned out quite a bit and they've been trying to "fix" it by shoeing him with his foot turned in so that it looks straight
    Damn. Why why why do people do that.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    5,078

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    Quote Originally Posted by FEIwannabe View Post
    Well - he's a no go - sadly.
    The vet went out to see him for a preliminary evaluation, because I was worried about that LF foot. The owner had the horse trimmed and shod, so the vet could see if what I saw was NQR was fixed with the trimming. But it is not.
    Apparently that foot naturally is turned out quite a bit and they've been trying to "fix" it by shoeing him with his foot turned in so that it looks straight. That is in turn putting presure on the outside of the hoof, causing it do deform and putting presure on the fetlock joint. Vet said that the horse will be lucky to stay sound long term for light riding. So sad because I think he was really nice otherwise and would have made a good upper level horse for me. I was just worried about soundness of that LF pastern.
    Thanks everyone for your imput. It's been good to hear everyone's opinion.
    On to choice #2.
    Too bad. He was lovely. I hope the vet has educated the owners on the errors of their ways. People don't always understand that every part of a body is connected.

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  11. #51
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
    Posts
    8,654

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crockpot View Post
    Damn. Why why why do people do that.
    One of my best farriers I have ever had, from whom I tragically moved 1,500 miles away, said that one of the best tests of a new farrier is to call with an alleged "fix" that is required.

    ie, "My horse's foot turns the one way, can you fix it."

    If the farrier says, "Here's all this stuff I can do to straighten him out," say thanks and hang up.

    If the farrier says, "No, I won't. I shoe the foot as it grows naturally," you have yourself a good farrier.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2000
    Posts
    9,482

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    Apparently that foot naturally is turned out quite a bit and they've been trying to "fix" it by shoeing him with his foot turned in so that it looks straight
    Quote Originally Posted by Crockpot View Post
    Damn. Why why why do people do that.
    I agree. Jeez - Quando-Quando has a seriously turned out front foot, and he not only went to Grand Prix, but also to the OLYMPICS! Obviously his farriers knew to shoe according to his foot - and not to someone's idealized vision.



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