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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 10, 2006
    Location
    Chicago, IL
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    190

    Default Are these pasterns too long?

    Do you think his pasterns are too long for upper level dressage?
    Try and look past that he's way overdue on trimming and he's too thin. Owner has stopped spending money on him.
    http://s26.beta.photobucket.com/user...79360262937721
    http://s26.beta.photobucket.com/user...54867633671825



  2. #2
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    Mar. 8, 2009
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    Montreal, Qc
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FEIwannabe View Post
    Do you think his pasterns are too long for upper level dressage?
    Try and look past that he's way overdue on trimming and he's too thin. Owner has stopped spending money on him.
    http://s26.beta.photobucket.com/user...79360262937721
    http://s26.beta.photobucket.com/user...54867633671825
    I don't know where you can see this horse is too thin?! Looks like a 6 to me!
    But yes, overly due for a good shoeing job.

    His legs are quite slim, tiny feet compared to his size and yes he has long pasterns. How old is he? What has he done so far?
    Any injuries?

    What do you mean by upper level?



  3. #3
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    Deep South
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    Default

    I'd be more worried about his neck. Is he a Spanish/Portugese type breed ?
    ... _. ._ .._. .._


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
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    Oct. 20, 2006
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    136

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Equibrit View Post
    I'd be more worried about his neck. Is he a Spanish/Portugese type breed ?
    Yes, cause we all know those Spanish/Portugese horses with their horrible thick necks can't do dressage. What a joke.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysxfAXmllwo


    4 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
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    Dec. 10, 2006
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    Chicago, IL
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    Default

    He's Spanish (PRE). Stallion. 6 y.o. probably 16.3 or 17hh. Has all his lateral work solid. Has well started changes, canter pirouettes, passage undersaddle but they need more work to solidify. Has piaffe started in hand.
    I'd like to get to PSG with him (AA) but hope to be able to play with GP moves at home if he can't make it all the way (competatively that is).
    I don't know about any past injuries. But, at the trot one of his front pasterns drops more than the other, which is a concern - especially at only 6 y.o. - hence the question re his pasterns.



  6. #6
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hobbs View Post
    Yes, cause we all know those Spanish/Portugese horses with their horrible thick necks can't do dressage. What a joke.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysxfAXmllwo
    No, that is not what I said. LOOK at the way he is put together and muscled.
    ... _. ._ .._. .._


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2010
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    2,471

    Default

    I think his pasterns are less concerning than other aspects of his conformation. However, uneven dropping of the pasterns in a young horse would be worrisome. Is the unevenness present even when he is recently (and correctly) trimmed and shod?


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2008
    Location
    Ohio
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    224

    Default

    Equibrit said:
    I'd be more worried about his neck. Is he a S
    panish/Portugese type breed ?
    I too could not look past his neck to even see the pasterns...


    3 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2002
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    Default

    For an upper level dressage prospect, I would pass. The pasterns are worrisome, and yes, the neck is, too. It could be the angle at which the photograph was taken, but the front and hind ends look like they belong to different horses. Based on this photo I would not consider this horse.
    Quote Originally Posted by SuzieQNutter
    The whip is held across your thigh so as you can still hold the reins without spilling your coffee!!
    SillyHorse adds: Or your wine.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
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    Mar. 8, 2009
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    Default

    For the neck, I think the picture is not helping.
    And I would suspect this horse is IR, he is really cresty and has fat deposits.

    Have you watch him or try him yet?

    This is a young stallion, it is normal that his neck is bigger than his bum for now especially if he's not finished growing yet. At 6, he is just starting to fill up.

    For the pastern going lower than the other one, yes that would be a concern. But the only way to know what is going on would be to have a PPE done by a vet you trust.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2013
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    Default

    If you're not interested, feel free to pm the info to me...


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2001
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    California
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    Default

    The pasterns bother me, and though it's possible that it's the way he's been stood up, he seems to stand camped out. I think you can do better for an upper level horse. Just my two cents.



  13. #13
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    Apr. 20, 2009
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    Raeford, North Carolina
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    Default

    I don't think his pasterns look too long. The angles are decent and they will make his gaits so much more comfy.

    Though it is hard to see past the dire need for a trim.
    "Drawing on my fine command of the English language, I said nothing" - Robert Benchley
    Cotton would fight.
    http://buildingthegrove.blogspot.com/



  14. #14
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    Mar. 15, 2007
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    Default

    Honestly, I can't tell from the picture and his condition. I think that some of the uneven muscling in this horse is due to incorrect training (6 and schooling pirouettes and passage?) This horse does not look nearly developed enough for this work and it looks like it contributed to an unfortunate topline). I'd wonder if the dropped pastern is due to bridle lameness, which I could see this horse having. I'd drop this horse waaaay back to first level, train correctly, and go from there.

    I think alot of horses can do PSG. Willingness is a huge factor and this horse is only 6. I wouldn't worry so much about how far this horse can go right now. I'd worry about getting his feet done and working on his basic training/topline first.



    Quote Originally Posted by FEIwannabe View Post
    He's Spanish (PRE). Stallion. 6 y.o. probably 16.3 or 17hh. Has all his lateral work solid. Has well started changes, canter pirouettes, passage undersaddle but they need more work to solidify. Has piaffe started in hand.
    I'd like to get to PSG with him (AA) but hope to be able to play with GP moves at home if he can't make it all the way (competatively that is).
    I don't know about any past injuries. But, at the trot one of his front pasterns drops more than the other, which is a concern - especially at only 6 y.o. - hence the question re his pasterns.
    Proud member of the Colbert Dressage Nation


    3 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by J-Lu View Post
    I think that some of the uneven muscling in this horse is due to incorrect training (6 and schooling pirouettes and passage?) This horse does not look nearly developed enough for this work and it looks like it contributed to an unfortunate topline).
    I would concur with that. When I started my young PRE , and before he had learned to balance and relax he had a big underneck that he would use to balance himself. He would occasionally tweak a muscle in his lower neck/wither area, which would appear to be a front leg lameness. Because he did not want to lift and swing one leg he would carry the weight longer on the unaffected side, forcing the pastern further down. He has since learnt better rhythm, regularity and balance, and developed more strength to do the work. These guys will not stretch like a warmblood, but they have to learn to relax and not hollow.
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  16. #16
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    Mar. 12, 2006
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    2,153

    Default

    Is he really 17h? I don't think the pasterns are excessively long, maybe because his hooves are so big it gives the appearance of too long. His neck just looks like a fat stallions neck, but the way his lower leg ties in behind the knee is about a bad as I've ever seen.

    Still, different breeds have body styles unique to them and they don't all mean unsoundness.
    "All top hat and no canter". *Graureiter*



  17. #17
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    Aug. 28, 2007
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    Triangle Area, NC
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    Default

    That tree stump of an under-neck disaster will give you far more trouble than those pasterns.
    dear god, where's the scalpel and forceps when you need them!

    (I'm a huge baroque fan FWIW)
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



  18. #18
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    May. 13, 2012
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    Default

    ..I think all I'm going to say is there are better options, and that horse has been pushed WAY to fast..(uneven muscling, young horse)



  19. #19
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    Mar. 8, 2009
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Arab_Mare View Post
    ..I think all I'm going to say is there are better options, and that horse has been pushed WAY to fast..(uneven muscling, young horse)
    With the right horse, right trainer and the right training system, 6yrs old schooling working pirouette, the beginning of passage and piaffe is not pushing the horse, especially a PRE.

    PSG horses can be 7yrs old. GP's 8.
    At the SRS, the horses are expected to be fully trained by 10yrs old for their carrousel.

    Young horses do develop in a uneven way. They don't grow up evenly either. It is normal. It needs to be adressed, but young stallions will develop their neck way more than their bum.

    I haven't seen this horse moving at liberty or under saddle so I can't judge if he's FEI material or not.



  20. #20
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    Jun. 11, 2004
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    Default

    Like other posters, I am not impressed with this guy as an upper level prospect. And he is NOT fat! His pasterns ARE abit long, but they really don't worry me as much as the fact he is very light boned for his size and that could lead to soundness issues in the future.

    And his hoof angle in the 2nd photo matches the angle of his pastern just perfectly, so I don't see a real issue with his feet. If they shortened the toe too much more the heel would be abit steep.



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