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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2010
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    S. Calif.
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    782

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    Quote Originally Posted by goodhors View Post
    They would go on faster, and with a sliding chin rope, probably give a bit more horse control. Should fit almost any size horse, like the slip-rope cattle and sheep halters. One size-fits-all, means you can use it fast on anyone in a fire crisis.
    Thanks for the explanation goodhors!



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun. 10, 2012
    Posts
    441

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    I too thought it was a cool idea (although why not just leave the chin strap there and clip the lead to it? I do get the gist of the one-size-fits-all...that does make sense.) until I saw them buckled around the bar.

    Why not hang them on a hook? It'll take a good few minutes to unbuckle all of those halters and rebuckle them (en route?) to get a horse.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2011
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    1,477

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    A bar would work if you had the supports in the center and left the ends open so the halters just slide right off the bar.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2012
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    34

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    I think the article and poses an interesting point. I may only be speaking for myself...but if my horse were in a fire, I wouldn't want firefighters spending time trying to get a halter on. I would want them to open the stall doors and shoo them out of the barn. I would rather worry about finding and catching the horse after they were free, although my barn is set back in an area away from main roads and traffic. Crazy?



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2010
    Location
    Maryland
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    592

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    This is why we don't use doors on stalls. The horses are kept in with simple straps (http://www.doversaddlery.com/equi-st...bd3tvleqbxc045) that theoretically the horses could break out of if there were a fire. If they actually would break out, I'm not sure, but it provides some peace of mind. We only have 3 stalls in a bank barn and 3 horses in a shed row so getting horses out wouldn't be as difficult as in a center aisle barn.

    I'm also in the camp that it concerns me to have a halter on 24/7 due to them getting hung up in the field or in the stall. Even a leather halter would worry me. There are definitely risks and advantages to both schools of thought and it's worth thinking about and weighing the pros and cons for your particular situation.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2010
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    Where humidity isn't just a word, it's a way of life.
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    887

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    Quote Originally Posted by hunterjumper21 View Post
    I think the article and poses an interesting point. I may only be speaking for myself...but if my horse were in a fire, I wouldn't want firefighters spending time trying to get a halter on. I would want them to open the stall doors and shoo them out of the barn. I would rather worry about finding and catching the horse after they were free, although my barn is set back in an area away from main roads and traffic. Crazy?
    The only issues with this are:

    a)If the stall is your horse's safety zone, they may very likely run right back into the burning barn (or refuse to leave in the first place no matter how hard one shoos). Well documented cases of this; we all hope our horses would be the smart ones who leave, but....

    b) that horse running around like crazy may pose a risk to firefighters and equipment; I for one would not want to be ran over by a freaked out horse blindly running around. And if in an area with traffic....



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
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    4,432

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    Interesting idea, but I don't see it actually working.

    I'm guessing that even my gentlest horse, in a fire, would not offer her head to a stranger to put a halter on. She's probably be quivering in the back of her stall. Sure any horse person could lead her out- with just a rope or piece of baler twine around her neck- but I don't think anybody that was the least bit hesitant could do so. My horses wear inexpensive leather halters all the time.

    Oh, and I don't think cow halters are that easy to put on - too floppy. It takes two hands- where I can slip a regular halter over a horse's head with one.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
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    7,499

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    Part of our Fire Clinic discussion was about LEADING equines out of the barn and putting them in paddocks. The speaker is a horse owner as well as 20+ year Fireman Vetran, and he repeated over and over, a loose horse WILL run back in the barn or refuse to leave the barn at all. The Fire Folk have to lead them out.

    Go back to page 1, read DriveNJ's post where her one horse was lost in a fire! We love them, but stall is horse safe place, even in fires. Her second horse is the ONLY horse I have heard that even tried to escape, by jumping out his window. Horse is scarred badly on his back, took over a year of care to heal, but has been able to return to driving use. He is also used at Burn Camp, where kids attend who have been badly scarred too, as a helpful example to give them hope for the future.

    Second point, was that Fire Folk are NOT horse people. They don't KNOW how to get a halter on a horse, and that was why the attendee Fire Folk were at the Clinic, TO LEARN ABOUT HORSES in fire situations. The Attendees gave the above a huge second, no idea how to halter or even LEAD a horse.

    Fire Clinician got everyone to make an Emergency Halter from a length of rope, taught the Fire Attendees too. Fire Folk ALWAYS carry some small rope on their body as part of their equipment, so they are familiar with using it. It was actually FASTER to use the rope Emergency Halter and get horse gone, than even getting real halter ON a horse. We did several "haltering races" using both methods, and the Emergency Halter made from a length of rope beat using the real halter hands down, done by experienced and rookie haltering folks. So I now have a 12ft length of rope hung on box stall doors for Emergency Haltering, if we need it. I figure the Fire Folk will know what to do with a length of rope handy, make some kind of loops for leading horse, in getting horse outside. Again, we PRACTICE this "lead with anything" on the horses, so they are not expecting perfection, lead easily with neck loop if needed and TROT out if lead fast.

    Those slip-on halters with leads are a good idea, but buckled on their bar, is wasted effort. Poor execution in time wasted, to put the idea into action with horses. A big hook for hanging is a better way to store them, grab the whole armful to go get equines. I still think I could do a rope halter with a rope length FASTER, than putting slip-ons on the animal.

    And you need to consider that what you can do with horse on a nice day, could be impossible to do in a fire situation. My horses halter nice too, but probably not going to behave as well in panic situations. That rope Emergency Halter is the best option to go with, no wasted time if horse DOESN"T let you slip halter on one-handed!



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