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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2001
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    With OP's new info (very close to home, friend who can help, BO will help in pinch), I'd choose the second place, too -- if I couldn't work things out at the current place.
    "If you can't feed 'em, don't breed 'em."



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 2001
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    Washington, DC
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    Quote Originally Posted by retrofit View Post
    OP, if everything else about your current situation is good, then I would stay put. There are plenty of horses who have had joints injected on full board. 12-16 hours of turnout per day is a lot.

    I would put my efforts into a good joint maintenance program and a good riding program for your horse to keep him fit and active.
    I have to ask you -- are you saying that injecting joints is a reasonable alternative to sufficient turnout?
    The big man -- no longer an only child

    His new little brother



  3. #23
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    Sep. 26, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by retrofit View Post
    OP, if everything else about your current situation is good, then I would stay put. There are plenty of horses who have had joints injected on full board. 12-16 hours of turnout per day is a lot.

    I would put my efforts into a good joint maintenance program and a good riding program for your horse to keep him fit and active.

    This is very true. In fact, I know of a lot of places out in California where I used to live that only provide 2-4 hours of turnout per day. Even then it's usually in a paddock that allows trot and maybe a bit of canter, but not a full out gallop. Many barns simply don't have the space for anything else. Where I live now in NJ, some places offer a couple hours of turnout in large fields, others do all day or all night turnout.

    I think a lot of horses can make a change from 24/7 down to 12-18 easily enough. It's harder when you go from 24/7 or all day to only 2. Depends on the horse.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
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    Jun. 25, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by asterix View Post
    I have to ask you -- are you saying that injecting joints is a reasonable alternative to sufficient turnout?
    The horse already had joint injections -- that's why the vet recommended 24/7 turnout. I think retrofit is just saying that with joint injections, 12-16 hours of turnout should be enough.
    "If you can't feed 'em, don't breed 'em."


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2005
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    mid-atlantic
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacchus View Post
    The horse already had joint injections -- that's why the vet recommended 24/7 turnout. I think retrofit is just saying that with joint injections, 12-16 hours of turnout should be enough.
    Yes, this is what I'm saying.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr. 22, 2006
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    1,331

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    If you are very happy with everything else, I would not move just to be out 24/7. 15 to 18 hours a day is a lot of turn out. Maybe you could talk with the vet again to find out what full time pasture board would get you. "would probably help" is pretty vague. The other barn(s) may seem good but you won't really know until you've moved in and boarded for a while. Boarding a horse in a barn where you are happy with everything else is priceless (and not so easy to replicate).

    I don't know where you are but I am in the northeast where I really appreciate having a stall available when the weather is horrid, think freezing rain, glare ice everywhere, frozen ground resembling an egg carton, ankle deep mud or when a horse has some injury that requires stall rest.
    "The captive bolt is not a proper tool for slaughter of equids they regain consciousness 30 seconds after being struck fully aware they are being vivisected." Dr Friedlander DVM & frmr Chief USDA Insp


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul. 12, 2010
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    321

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    OP-
    Have you talked to the BM at your current place about the vet's recommendation? I'd wait until you see how the upcoming schedule switch works for for your horse. If the 15-18 hrs seems to be enough, in July-Aug (when BM has gotten to know you better) meet with your BM and explain that you love the place and would like their input on solving the turn out problem for the winter. They may step up with a solution or agree that you need to move elsewhere for pasture board over the winter. Either way, I think that conversation will keep you from burning the bridge for the future.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2006
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    2,581

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    In adequate turnout would be a deal breaker for me.

    If it was short term say spending six months in an area that had reduced turnout but the care was exceptional that would be okay. But for long term facility my horses must have at least an attached run to there stall at all times.



  9. #29
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    Aug. 7, 2012
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    335

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    Thanks everyone for your input! I have decided that Im going to stay at my current place as long as it takes to find a good pasture board alternative. My area is full of college student who will be leaving in May so a lot of places have waiting lists now but if I need to stay until May, Ill be fine. My current BO will not do pasture board and I have talked with her about what the vet said.

    I have had my mare on pasture board as long as I have had her except at this place and the major stifle problems started when I moved her back in November but it has been cold, the turnout was on a really steep hill, and she started being in 12 hours overnight. Once turnout changes, she will get more hours out and I have moved her to the flatter field but the fence isnt great out there either so Im a bit nervous but I think she will be ok for a month or so.



  10. #30
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    Jan. 21, 2010
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    2,204

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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Fencing--one of my things where my tolerance for "bad" is minimal.
    Me too. All it takes is one horse to test it once, that crappy fence comes crashing down, and you have a herd of loose horses, potentially causing accidents on highways.

    As for the place that is more hands-on for you, I would prefer that over a place where I'm sketched about the safety and the care. But I also prefer control over my horse's care, and learned ways to work around taking off work for farrier/vet/blanket changes/etc. You may make a friend there so you guys can share responsibilities. Or, if you become a beloved boarder, the BO/BM may make exceptions for you and blanket or unblanket your horse if they think it's necessary or you're stuck at work.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2008
    Location
    Delaware Valley
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    I've boarded in enough places - several states and other countries - to know that every place has pros and cons and that horses can thrive in a wide variety of situations. The deal breaker for me is management that is ignorant, inattentive or cuts corners (when it comes to basic care) because of financial reasons. Also management that is crazy.
    Last edited by Jeito; Mar. 13, 2013 at 10:57 AM.


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  12. #32
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2012
    Location
    Portland, OR
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    155

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    Quote Originally Posted by quietann View Post
    The biggest deal-breaker for me would be a BO that lies to me, especially if it involves my horse.
    THIS is where i draw a line. I can tolerate a lot of things but liars is not one of them.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2012
    Location
    Portland, OR
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    155

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    Quote Originally Posted by Discobold View Post
    I've boarded in enough places - several states and other countries - to know that every place has pros and cons and that horses can thrive in a wide variety of situations. The deal breaker for me is management that is ignorant, inattentive or cuts corners (when it comes to basic care) because of financial reasons. Also management that is crazy.
    oh and this - the crazies. i can't handle, and shouldn't have to handle, the crazies.


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  14. #34
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2012
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    335

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    So I decided NOT to go to the barn with the terrible fencing because I decided I would always worry about when/if she got into the fence, the vet bills, etc.

    So now its between two other barns in the area.

    Barn B (the sort-a self-care place) and Barn C.

    In terms of care and fence, they are the same. The riding conditions are difference.

    Barn B is a lesson barn. After work (when I like to ride) the ring is full of kids. I can ride during lessons but its hard to weave in and out of kids who may or may not know how to steer. If I wait an hour or so, its not so bad because lessons are usually over. The ring is clear on the weekends and in the summer because she teaches in the mornings. They go to shows so I can tag along if I want to get out. The BO is the only instructor allowed to teach because that’s how she makes her living and I respect that. She is a good instructor but I would really miss my current instructor. The ring is fine, footing is fine. Hacking out is limited though and we get bored in the ring. There are areas to hack out to but there are cows and my horse is terrified of cows. I guess that’s something we could work on.....assuming I don’t die in the process.

    Barn C doesn’t have a ring but has a field with a few small flat areas and another flat area inside the pasture that I can ride on. BO says he will keep it mowed but since he does rotational grazing, at certain times during the summer, those areas may be fenced off. Hacking at this place would be amazing but remote. I’d be on my own hacking out so that’s a risk. I took my friend/instructor with me to see it. We were both pretty excited about this place because it’s cheap, care is excellent, hacking is great, and I was thinking I could make due with field riding since everything else is good. However, after thinking on it a few days, my instructor thinks I will be taking one step forward, two steps backwards with my goals because I really don’t have a good surface to practice on and because of my mares stifle problems, the uneven ground might be too jarring for her. I’d probably be one of two boarders. No one shows so there wouldn’t be any opportunities to get away.

    I guess I just answered my questions. I guess Barn B is the best choice. I’m just bummed because neither are the perfect fits but at both, my horse would be in good hands. It really helped to lay out the choices here so thanks for bearing with me



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