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  1. #1
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    Aug. 13, 2011
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    Default Help for mare-sour gelding!

    Well the honeymoon period is over. I moved my gelding to a new boarding barn Sunday. Since then it has been a total nightmare to handle and ride him. He was not like this at all when he was at home. At home he was turned out with one other gelding and a mare was in the next pasture over. He never really had any interaction with her so I never saw this side of him. At the new boarding barn he is turned out with my friend's mare (the same one that he could see from his pasture) and has gotten very sweet on her to the point where I actually checked to make sure that he was gelded.

    Now whenever he sees any mare he puffs himself up and will try to bolt, drag, or otherwise totally ignore me when I am handling him on the ground. In the arena he will ride okay with other mares around but as soon as they leave the arena he loses his brain out the window. Last night we had a major explosion.

    Also last night I had him cross tied and a couple horses were lead by, when a mare was lead by I thought he was going to flip himself over. Thankfully he ended up just sitting down on his butt.

    He does not have this reaction around other geldings.

    The BO does not want to turn him out with the main herd (20+ horses all in one field) since we are only going to be there until the weather gets nicer and we can use the outdoor at home.

    I really have no idea what to do. I have never had a horse that had this kind of reaction to another horse.

    I am not a particularly brave rider, but I tried to stick through it last night and get at least a few strides of calm walk before I jumped off. He thoroughly put the fear of God in me though. I don't want to be the girl that throws up her hands when the going gets tough, but I can't afford to get hurt. Selling him has crossed my mind, I don't think he is my forever horse anyway. In fact he kind of feels like the rebound boyfriend. However, I have no idea who the heck would want to buy a horse that reacts so strongly to mares being around.

    Maggie Bright, lovingly known as Skye and deeply missed (1994 - 2013)
    The Blog


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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2008
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    Default

    Well, Sunday was only two days ago. I wouldn't panic just yet.

    It sounds like he won't be able to be turned out with mares. That's not super unusual. Two of my three geldings are pretty obnoxious. Ironically the one was not gelded until he was six is the one that's fine.

    Put a chain over his nose when you handle him on the ground-- and use it. Tack him up in his stall if it's busy. Lunge him a bit before you ride. Set him up for success by doing very basic stuff for a few days, even if it means taking him for a walk in hand instead of riding. Give it a little time, maybe. But my guess is that you will need to permanently separate him from his lady friends.


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  3. #3
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    Default

    I am going to ask separating him but I am afraid that separating him will mean no turnout until it is warm enough to turn out day and night. She is just not set up to have horses separate from the big herd. Right now they are turned out on the grass jumping arena. Other than that there is one field for the main group of horses and one field for the horses that are there on pasture board.

    I'm trying not to panic but like I said I will admit I am not very brave. Even leading him around when he starts acting like a stud makes me nervous.
    Maggie Bright, lovingly known as Skye and deeply missed (1994 - 2013)
    The Blog



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 18, 2004
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    Red Bank, NJ
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    Default

    My horse is fine with mares turned out in adjacent paddocks, but if he's turned out with a mare in his paddock, he gets very attached.

    We spent months dealing with it last year, and tried a few scenarios, giving him time to settle in after each change. He dropped a lot of weight and I worried about injury because he ran the fence whenever the mare left the field for riding.

    If I could do it all over again, I'd just skip turning him out with mares and I'll always request only gelding paddock buddies in the future. We have a few geldings at the barn who are happy and well-adjusted with mares in their paddocks, but mine is not one of them. They do seem to be especially attached to horses when they move to a new barn, too. Best of luck- I feel your frustration!



  5. #5
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    Apr. 1, 2008
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    Default

    are you holding the lead right at his chin? If so, put the chain over his nose and hold the lead about 6-12 inches lower. If he's puffing and calling or anything, make an abrupt about turn and keep walking. Rinse, lather repeat till he's paying attention to you.

    there are things that are your job and things that are his, paying attention to you and not the other horses is his.



  6. #6
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  7. #7
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    Default

    in that vid, at about 4:20, notice that when the horse turns, he steps way over with his hind feet. He's disengaging his hindquarters. That's important as he can't keep going if this happens



  8. #8
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    Aug. 13, 2011
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by threedogpack View Post
    Well he had some good tips, but IMO the horse looked like he had been there before.

    Wish he had addressed what to do when a horse won't stop when you stop, even with a stud chain on him. Cody will just keep walking.
    Maggie Bright, lovingly known as Skye and deeply missed (1994 - 2013)
    The Blog



  9. #9
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    Default

    Try Vicks VaporRub under the nose. I've had several that just could never be turned out with mares...they got the adolescent sillies.



  10. #10
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    Oct. 9, 2000
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    Oregon, sitting on my couch looking out the window at a mountain
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    Default

    Where under the nose do you put it? Just under the nostril? On the upper lip?

    I also have one who gets very attached to mares. Not ALL mares, just blonde ones - he must have Oedipus complex! (I am assuming that his mom had palomino coloring since that's the color of mare that gets him going!)
    My Mustang Adventures - Mac, my mustang | Annwylid D'Lite - my Cob filly

    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran



  11. #11
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    Apr. 1, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skyedragon View Post
    Well he had some good tips, but IMO the horse looked like he had been there before.

    Wish he had addressed what to do when a horse won't stop when you stop, even with a stud chain on him. Cody will just keep walking.
    according to Warwick, he had not been there before. He came in for training.

    Cody can't keep walking if you do the about turn. He's going to run into the chain over his nose. If you hold the lead just a little down from the snap, then if he flings his head up, it's nothing to do with you.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f1kl2iIpWqg



  12. #12
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    Well Cody has been put in time out. He was chasing the two mares that he was turned out with into the ground and trying to mount them. He is now turned out in the round pen, which sucks because he has no shelter. I would love for him to be turned out with the big herd, but BO is worried that it is an accident waiting to happen with the already established dominate geldings.
    Maggie Bright, lovingly known as Skye and deeply missed (1994 - 2013)
    The Blog


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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2004
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    Central Florida
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    It could be with a well placed kick. Same for him mounting mares. He needs a good dose of reality check but it is risky and not worth it if you are a temp. I agree with the Vicks (just on a tad on the bottom of nostril). I think at this point he knows your are nervous and it now running with it. You may need someone to help you. You can not be nervous with geldings like this. You need to give him a CTJ meeting and get his focus on you 100%
    *^*^*^
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  14. #14
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    Jul. 13, 2011
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    East Longmeadow, MA
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    Default

    My horse was like Cody when I first got him at age 3. Lots of helpful advice so far on this thread, love the videos. My guy cannot be turned out with ANY other horses - loves the mares way too much and hurts the geldings.
    What's wrong with you?? Your cheese done slid off its cracker?!?!



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