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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2003
    Posts
    358

    Default What is the normal space for a double fence?

    The farm we just bought has shared fences with the three farms around it. Luckily only one side has other horses. We were thinking of double fencing that side, but I was wondering what the normal distance between the two fences usually is? I would like it far enough so that they cannot touch. I noticed the neighbor has a gelding a two mares (which is also what I have) and my gelding has a history of fighting with other gelding over fences. He is fine with mares, but will get very protective of 'his' two mares. It's only 5 acres so we are trying to maximize the space but I'm willing to loose some pasture to keep them apart. Electric fence will also not work, which I though I could have put closer, so we are going with 4 board. Thanks!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    6,498

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Honu View Post
    The farm we just bought has shared fences with the three farms around it. Luckily only one side has other horses. We were thinking of double fencing that side, but I was wondering what the normal distance between the two fences usually is? I would like it far enough so that they cannot touch. I noticed the neighbor has a gelding a two mares (which is also what I have) and my gelding has a history of fighting with other gelding over fences. He is fine with mares, but will get very protective of 'his' two mares. It's only 5 acres so we are trying to maximize the space but I'm willing to loose some pasture to keep them apart. Electric fence will also not work, which I though I could have put closer, so we are going with 4 board. Thanks!
    Well I think of normal lanes as 12' or so, but in your situation I would go a bit wider than the widest vehicle (mower) you will drive in there. I am assuming you can turn around elsewhere or back out.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    46,985

    Default

    12' is a minimum, I have seen 14', 16' and 20'+ between paddocks in big TB breeding farms.

    Be sure to keep the fence line clear, so later no one can say your new fence is the property boundary.
    Keep showing "legal possession" of that land between the fences by keeping it up and if you possibly can, use it somehow, so it is not later being disputed and by keeping any use of it, like as leaves dump, from your neighbor.

    Here, after a few years of not using land like you will have there between fences, a neighbor may claim it.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    10,235

    Default

    You want a distance equal to or greater than the longest distance two horses can stretch their necks so I'd say a minimum of 8' and 12' is better. We have electrobraid and have it set up with internal tractorways too, it's clear that the neighbors continous fence is the boundary fence. One barn I went to used the buffers as individual turnouts for certain horses, and I've used the tractorways as day grazing here. Our neighbor's fence is barb wire so I have to be cautious.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  5. #5
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2005
    Location
    Elmwood, Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,384

    Default

    An alternative would be to use a barely wide enough fence
    (maybe 6' wide) and plant a hedge just outside your fence
    which will grow to block your horses' view of the next
    pasture. Once the bushes are over 6' high, your horses
    most likely won't be very interested in the animals on the
    other side. The planting will probably require annual
    trimming, but not as much work as having to mow a grass
    lane and clearly defends the land as yours and not neighbors.
    Robin from Dancing Horse Hill
    Elmwood, Wisconsin



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2008
    Location
    Nowhere, Maryland
    Posts
    4,322

    Default

    Make it wide enough so you can mow it in one pass with a decent sized tractor and ride in the lane. 10-12' sounds about right.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    10,235

    Default

    Oh and you have to remember to put in a gate or two so you can get in to mow, or put compatible horses in for turnout or day grazing, or use it as a nice dog walking trail or horseback riding area.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    46,985

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Highflyer View Post
    Make it wide enough so you can mow it in one pass with a decent sized tractor and ride in the lane. 10-12' sounds about right.
    That would be a great way to use that lane if the nearby horses are not too aggressive and run at you when you ride by.
    If wide enough you can use it as an exercise and warm-up lane, that is clearly your land and in use.

    How long of a space and fence are you needing there?



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