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  1. #21
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    Sep. 21, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Molly Malone View Post
    One thing that does get disheartening is when you *do* comply with all the requests - photos, then video of conformation and under saddle gaits. Then video of loose walk and trot and canter with specific angles requested. And then get a request from the trainer of more photos and a video of the horse being lunged in a dark saddle with a white saddle pad focussed on the saddle so she can see how much the horse's back moves up and down because her client has a bad back.

    And that was the point I said no. If "feel" was the most important criteria and the mare met all the other criteria then the buyer had to take time to fly down and ride as far as I was concerned.

    The customer is always right, but good lord there's a limit!

    (The horse sold to the first person who came to see her in person)
    THIS is exactly my point. As I mentioned in my subsequent post above, our foals we have raised have multiple photos ( one of them over 50) and we keep our facebook page current. We DO provide videos. Some of the responses have indicated that point is not getting across. It's the repeated requests after that that become tiresome and indicate to me this buyer really needs to "see" the horse. Of course the issue may be they are truly just tire kickers who like looking at horse pictures.



  2. #22
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    Sep. 21, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Helpus View Post


    To the OP, vent all you want. But breeders/sellers who acommodate potential buyers' requests will be selling their young stock, while you are sitting on yours. You may have God's gift tot he GP ring sitting in your fields, but unless you let people know what you have, yours will not get sold as quickly and/or for the price you want.
    Because we breed and raise something very specific, we don't "sit" on ours very long. In fact most of our recent sales have been in utero based on pedigree etc.

    Because I come from a racing TB background I cannot discount the opportunity to see the horse in person.



  3. #23
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    Sep. 21, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by alliekat View Post
    You are absolutely right. We just helped market a yearling for someone. Of course it was Feb. and in the midst of his winter woolies. I bathed him, trimmed him up with the clippers, pulled his mane and braided him. I shot a video of him and there was someone else to take pictures. He looked fantastic and although he was not slick coated like he would be in the spring, he cleaned up well. For the couple hours put in to prepare him for his pics an videos, he sold in less than a week. The effort was apparent. In fact even the owner was blown away with how well he cleaned up.
    The difference here is based on your website Worthashot, marketing horses for others I would assume for a fee is part of your business correct? So the seller is paying for your services and rightfully so. I would hope and expect that to be reflected in the price. If I would hire someone like you and perhaps that is the "answer" here - telling the buyers I can provide them with professional video and a full photo portfolio fore X amount of dollars. Some buyers may opt for that and some may get in the car and come and see.



  4. #24
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    Jul. 27, 2005
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    Chapel Hill, NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by alter12345 View Post
    The difference here is based on your website Worthashot, marketing horses for others I would assume for a fee is part of your business correct? So the seller is paying for your services and rightfully so. I would hope and expect that to be reflected in the price. If I would hire someone like you and perhaps that is the "answer" here - telling the buyers I can provide them with professional video and a full photo portfolio fore X amount of dollars. Some buyers may opt for that and some may get in the car and come and see.
    You could try that approach I look at it like a cost of doing business. And yes we charge a fee for our time, but in many instances the right pictures and videos will increase your sales price, bad pics, or not enough can not only lower the price, it can kill the sale all together.
    When I help clients, my first question is to ask what they are asking for their youngsters, in many cases after we put together the marketing material, we are able to ask and get a considerable amount more for them.
    No one will argue that it can be time consuming and frustrating to do it for what turns out to be a "tire kicker" but in the end you can reuse those images and videos on your website and to stay current on people news feed on FB. So it is not a total loss.
    Worth A Shot Farm
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    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
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    Mar. 28, 2003
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    I hear your vent. I think we've all been there. My personal favorites are the ones you send photos, do videos, multiple emails, chat on the phone, maybe even get to the agreed price/ contract/ shipping arrangement stage and then they drop off the face of the earth. But, if you're in this long enough, you get to experience the opposite as well -- the person who stops by with a friend and isn't even shopping but decides to buy the mudball yearling she just 'clicked' with over the fencerail. The friend of a friend who sees a video you just made for fun and buys the horse sight unseen because of your reputation and because she liked what she saw on the video. The people who walk up to you at horse shows and ask to buy your horse.

    Personally, I think Facebook is becoming a great place to sell horses and I'll go so far as to say it has some similarities to an auction situation (in a good way). There are several groups and pages where you can post photos and videos, provide a write-up, and give contact info. This allows many people to "see" your horse and to tell others about it. If you do a good job with the photos and video, you might just have a few shoppers calling you at once, competing with each other. So, when you do get that video and those photos you need, you can get them out there right away.

    Does anyone else remember the days when you had to use a million cables to get the video off your camera and onto a VHS tape, which you then had to send via snail mail? Things HAVE gotten a lot easier for us, if you think about it.
    Kendra
    Runningwater Warmbloods & Mare Station

    Home of SPS Diorella (Donnerhall/ Akut), EMC What Fun (Wolkentanz I/ Lauries Crusador), and EMC Raleska (Rascalino/ Warkant) 'Like' us on Facebook


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
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    Dec. 20, 2010
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    The cost of providing professional video and photos would be the responsibility of the seller, not the buyer. No way would I opt to pay a price just to see video of a potential horse. Pass, on to the next one.

    As both a buyer and seller, I considers providing video and pictures a part of the marketing campaign and figure the cost into the pricing structure of the horse.

    I've bought most of my horses from long distances , usually from across the country from me and most sight unseen. I am usually on a very tight budget and do not want to spend my limited budget flying all over the place to see a horse so I rely very heavily on good video and good pictures. I'm in Texas and my last horse came from Arizona, a bit too far to just hop in the truck and go see. The seller was great at sending me several videos showing me a few things I requested beyond just watching a horse W/T/C around an arena.

    I think the biggest problem is a lot of sellers think their pics and video are good enough and can't understand why the buyer wants more. The truth is, many are not. I've been keeping my eye out for the perfect filly to add to my program and I can't tell you how many I've looked at where all I see is a baby being chased around a pen. There is almost always no calm quiet walk moments where I an evaluate the walk. No standing conformation shots at all. No moments of the youngster being walked to and from the camera so I can get an idea of how it travels. So, all the potential buyer has to go on is a young horse frantically dashing around. Those kind of videos don't tell me what I need to know in order to take it to the next level. I can look beyond the hairy coats but the rest? It's too easy to click out and move on to the next one.


    10 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
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    Jul. 5, 2002
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    FL
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    We produce pictures and videos of our babies as I mentioned and don't mind doing it but there is only so much you can do with a baby. As someone mentioned above - if they know what they are looking for, one or two good photos should be somewhat telling. A bit of video for movement and you have a really good idea - after that if you have interest, go and look. If you have an untrained eye, going to look is the one of the ways to train that eye.

    Edited to add: We do maintain a very active facebook page, where for example one of our youngsters for sale has over 50 photos of the first two years of his life so far. Admittedly none of them are from the last month but I would think you could get the idea.
    When you are selling unstarted youngsters, you need to have a realistic idea of how that process is likely to play out. It is not easy and buyers are limited.

    First of all, you must have a minimum of what you describe above. If a buyer wants a more recent photo, go ahead and take a couple of recent conformation shots. If it is winter and you have a wooly bear, explain that wooly bears can look awfully funny and that your shiny, older pics represent the horse more honestly.

    Beyond that, you need to know your market. You will NOT be able to please some people, no matter what you do. There are a few buyers out there who have very unrealistic requirements or uneducated eyes. They will never find the right young horse, either because they want the perfect horse for almost nothing or because they cannot recognize a good youngster, simply because they don't know what is normal for weanlings, yearlings, etc.

    You WILL be able to interest the buyer who wants your horse, but those buyers may be rare. Only a handful of buyers will know what they need and be able to recognize it when they see it. So, you will have to send a ton of stuff out in order to find that one person that is right for your youngster. That is just reality. On the other hand, if you can wait and sell once the youngster is under saddle, you have a lot more buyers who are capable of knowing what they really need and you may also have a trainer who will ably market your horse for you.

    Sadly, breeders really do have to be jacks of all trade. You must not only raise the babies well, but must be able to present them adequately and talk to buyers in an honest and straight forward manner. You do not have to have perfect professional pics and video, but there IS a minimum in quality. You must be able to present a clear picture of what the youngster really is and then hope that the buyer can see it. Don't take personally the ones who walk away. Be patient and the right one will come along if you have provided the essential for evaluating the youngster.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
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    Mar. 12, 2006
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    Because of our location we absolutely HAVE to be accommodating as far a videos and photos. We do our best to have at least a basic video of each horse up on You Tube and try to do whatever additional footage the buyer may want. Even in the middle of winter we are usually able to do this. The hardest time is early Spring. The horses here grow HEAVY winter coats because they live outside and are not blanketed. They are starting to shed, their winter coats are dingy and dull and you can groom until your arms fall off and they will still look like Wooly Mammoths. But, most people seem to understand this, and we usually have summer pictures so they can see that, yes, this horse shines up well.

    For us, it is a matter of our responsibility to the client. We have to do our best to convince them that buying OUR horse is a good idea. Can it be frustrating? Oh yes, but you can't take it personally, the "right" buyer always seems to come along.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
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    Oct. 29, 2000
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoDQhere View Post
    Because of our location we absolutely HAVE to be accommodating as far a videos and photos. We do our best to have at least a basic video of each horse up on You Tube and try to do whatever additional footage the buyer may want. Even in the middle of winter we are usually able to do this. The hardest time is early Spring. The horses here grow HEAVY winter coats because they live outside and are not blanketed. They are starting to shed, their winter coats are dingy and dull and you can groom until your arms fall off and they will still look like Wooly Mammoths. But, most people seem to understand this, and we usually have summer pictures so they can see that, yes, this horse shines up well.

    For us, it is a matter of our responsibility to the client. We have to do our best to convince them that buying OUR horse is a good idea. Can it be frustrating? Oh yes, but you can't take it personally, the "right" buyer always seems to come along.
    NoDQ, I love your site. It shows your horses standing, moving well, and jumping. Had I known about you, I would definitely have inquired about your horses. So your "problem" is not in your web site, but in finding a way to get people to look at it in the first place. I suggest an ad on Warmbloods-For-Sale. That is where I went when I was looking and I found a good selection of horses on it.

    The only suggestion I can give (and I might have asked you to take a video so I could see), is that you have a long distance between the "set up" jump and the "show off jump". It results in pictures of your horses jumping "at the jump", thereby showing the horse with a flat back. If you brought the 2 jumps closer together by at least 2', the horse would be required to take a short stride and rock back and jump "around the jump" showing his bascule.

    It would also show the horse's intelligence in finuring out that he needed to jump in short to the first jump to give himself room to negotiate the second one.

    As a buyer I will not fault a young horse for making a mistake. What I want to see is how he solves the problem the next time around. That means more to me than seeing a video in which everything is made easy for the horse.

    This is the video I saw that resulted in my buying this horse from Showjumper66. I also asked for a video of the horse moving in a controlled manner, so I could see how he really moved. She was happy to comply, and I bought him sight unseen.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8aV_...8035995C689EAB

    90 seconds long with 3 jumps, and I was hooked.
    "I used to have money, now I have horses."


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
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    Jul. 28, 2004
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    Texas
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    I have a friend who breeds hunter type Apps. She has had 6 - 8 babies this year, I do not know the exact number. I think she has sold all of them, and most before or just after they hit the ground. Her "secret"? Her breeding is very very focussed. She knows exactly what she is breeding for. She has two stallions, one the son of the other. She selects and owns her own mares. She absolutely knows what she is doing. Her babies CONSISTENTLY have the same good minds and are lovely hunter type movers. She has been to zillions of shows. She knows a good hunter mover when she sees it and how to breed for it.

    Her buyers are a very focussed market -- App hunter types. Except for me, I have two of hers that I will show in the open hunter shows because it is so much fun to take a pretty and nice moving App to show against the warmbloods. I bought my two as babies, knowing from her breeding program what I would get. They are four and five now and are exactly what I wanted and expected.

    I sort of scratch my head at other breeders, who claim to breed "sporthorses" and don't ever really seem sure if they have a hunter, jumper, dressage, or eventer. Or when they say it is a "good mover" but don't seem to have a clue whether they mean dressage or hunter.
    friend of bar.ka


    5 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
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    May. 9, 2001
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    Neither of these buying stories are related to foals/weanlings/yearlings, but I still like to share them.

    My current gelding was listed for sale on warmbloods-for-sale.com and dreamhorse for months. Months and months and months and months. No video, not even a picture, just a one sentence description written in all caps, an age, breed, name, and color. The age fit what I was looking for and I liked the breed, so when my trainer friend was travelling to where he was (about a 9 hour drive for us) I went along to try him. I contacted the seller and was emailed one old photo. I thought for sure the horse must be hideous now, that there must be something *seriously wrong* with him to be for sale for so long at a very low price, but nope, he was (and still is ) quite a nice horse. The only thing "wrong" with him is he was on the older side of what most people want or will consider, *and* he wasn't really marketed at all. I have no doubt the seller could have sold him at 3-5 times the price I paid in a matter of weeks if there had been a better description along with photos and a video.

    I'm in the process of buying a new horse of a relatively rare breed, and there are four mares I am considering. Mares A and B have several short videos available, and when I asked for a video of them being groomed and tacked up it was taken the next time they were ridden, which was later that week. The videos aren't fancy or edited, and I'm guessing they are shot with a phone propped up on a ledge. I have a good feel for what Mares A and B are like and I know what to expect when I go to see them in a few weeks (that trip will be an 11 hour drive, and I plan to take my trailer). Mare C has an outdated video from the last time she was sold, approximately 18-24 months ago. I have learned my lesson with old pictures/videos, and I really need to see something current before I will go to see her (it's only a 4 hour drive for Mare C). Mare D sounds really lovely, but I have seen nothing at all - owner has very high standards and wants a beautiful video. While beautiful videos are nice, I would rather see an "every day" video than nothing at all, and I actually prefer a series of short, unedited videos. Mare D is a 7 hour drive, but on the way to Mares A and B. If I don't get anything on Mare D, I may not even bother to go look at her.

    Anyway, my point here is that even casual videos can be helpful to a sale. Nicely produced sales videos are great and definitely help get higher prices, but sometimes just recording "every day" things goes a long way in helping the buyer imagine the horse being theirs. I've been imagining Mare B being mine for a few weeks now...


    3 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
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    Apr. 28, 2008
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    Someone asked what buyers want to see. I have bought off pics and/or video several times and think an ideal sale video would include movement at all 3 gaits on decent footing, NOT being chased around excessively so you can see normal movement. Front, side and back conformation view (maybe pics for this). Down the jump chute if a jumper prospect that is 2 or more and unbroken. All of this can take 90 seconds.

    One thing that is often overlooked and I like to see with weanlings/yearlings when possible is video of mom performing. I can usually always find video of the stallions. I realize this is not always possible, but it's great if you've got it.

    I have bought off pics alone but in that case I already knew mare and stallion. All I needed was confirmation that baby came out looking like it ought to.


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  13. #33
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    Jun. 14, 2012
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    california
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    I've purchased sight unseen, pics & a short video. I won't drive more than an hour one way to look at a horse I haven't seen a picture of (too much on my plate).

    I've hopped a plane after seeing 30 seconds of a muddy 2 yr old and it took me 15 months to get the seller to send me a video. when I arrived, she admitted she never thought I'd come to the farm let alone give her a deposit.

    Mud & fuzzy hair is fine; we're horse people. cross cantering in free jumping...well, probably shouldn't send me that one. it doesn't have to be oscar worthy but don't send a cartoon either.


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  14. #34
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    Jan. 15, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by alliekat View Post
    You are absolutely right. We just helped market a yearling for someone. Of course it was Feb. and in the midst of his winter woolies. I bathed him, trimmed him up with the clippers, pulled his mane and braided him. I shot a video of him and there was someone else to take pictures. He looked fantastic and although he was not slick coated like he would be in the spring, he cleaned up well. For the couple hours put in to prepare him for his pics an videos, he sold in less than a week. The effort was apparent. In fact even the owner was blown away with how well he cleaned up.
    And that would be me. And even I didn't know EXACTLY what I had - working full time - etc etc etc - and hopeless with camera, video, okay almost anything technical I won't take time here to gush too much over WASF but well deserved - but no doubt, a great video makes a difference - !! The only request I got after video published off kilter for me was "if I had a video of the 9 month over fences". I politely said "no" and that I didn't expect to get one
    "Her life was okay. Sometimes she wished she were sleeping with the right man instead of with her dog, but she never felt she was sleeping with the wrong dog."



    www.dontlookbackfarm.com


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  15. #35
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    Apr. 14, 2006
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    When I read the OP, I could TOTALLY relate!! I'm of the non-electronic age and have no real help...DH is a doll and a good horseman, but won't even walk in the room where my computer is. Last time he took pictures for me...60% of the frames had no horse in them!! One person can NOT do a decent video, but I have recently found a great young woman...terrific rider and in possession of modern technology skills!!! All the posts "telling it how it is" these days has gotten me inspired!! I have a great, new, "dummy proof" video camera with an ez download and will now make a serious attempt to get with modern sales techniques. With all the online photo/video sites as well as a good farm web site, the cost of having pix and video available is almost free. In the old days when you had to copy and mail bulky tapes, cost was an issue...these dyas I don't see how a seller could "afford" to pass the cost on to a potential seller. They'll just go look elsewhere. I spent two hours on the phone the other night talking to a shopper...I don't really think I'll ever hear from her again, but that's not a risk I'm willing to take. Too many horses...too few buyers to take the chance of insulting one. And you never know...sometimes the least likely shopper pulls out the wallet first!! "Ya'll" gave me lots of good ideas, though. Thanks.
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #36
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    You are messing yourself up by making the buyer the enemy. Just as you have set up an efficient horse raising operation you need to add the efficient marketing arm. You designed your paddocks now you need to design or pick a display paddock...and yes I mean design. It needs to be small enough to show the horses but not so big they can get away from you and out of range. There will be a fence line that is keeping the light mostly behind you...gussy up that fence line over time...at least make sure it looks safe. You will be directing the mares and foals or youngsters to make passes down that fence line. By watching them during your days I bet you know where they like to put on airs and flash dance. That is a great place to figure out how to film. My mares box and dance as they come up from the front...there is a narrow bottle neck that limits how far they can get away from a simple camera. You design it to meet your needs. For video I have a paddock with trees on a couple sides that has the sun over my right shoulder in the morning...it is a bit too large for one horse but 3 horses will sport together and look awesome. They were all filmed at their moment and then edited apart for a video starring each one. What time of day can you head out with a video camera. It should be morning or evening as the light is better and that does make a difference. You don't want to try to get flattering video in full sun midday you will be disappointed with what you get. You need at least a couple of people besides the camera operator. It is something to schedule. Foals look best between 3 weeks and 3 months and again about 6 months...there is no excuse not to set up one time to video them in that chunk of time. I have Irish Draughts and there may not BE another time they are so attractive for 3 years or more if they grow weirdly. Those baby pictures will be your go to shots for a long time, they will show a lot about the final horse and what the adolecent geek will get back to. If you can't make time to get good pictures of your babies just go shoot yourself. You are avoiding something that should give you pleasure. It will make you smile instead of feel depressed about something you didn't make time for. Don't reinvent the video everytime. Think how simple the German auction videos are...one horse at a time...lead at the walk and halt...under saddle trot by, canter by both directions...that's it. Same thing for foal videos you need to show them standing on flat ground/cut/show them trotting...that is tough for me as Irish Draughts canter everywhere they go no matter how short the distance. Don't obsess about what you didn't get...maybe the next time...if you have tons of beautiful canter as they go round and round the mares in the pasture that is a day well spent. You want them up and interested but not scared and crashing about afraid for their lives. It is a fine line in sport horses...they want to see movement but they don't want the foals to look like Arabs all snorty and upside down. Then learn to piece the good parts together. Do not worry about cuts and them thinking you are hiding things...it is a baby...they want to see it be all sparkly and fancy. You have to present your horses but you don't need to send out individual videos for everyone. Post the vid on YouTube. Send them the link. Sellers are not your enemy. If you sell you get to breed more. If you don't sell then you have to pay to or start them yourself and then market them under saddle...the market thing does not go away...at some point you have to market. Better before you spend lots more money. I am learning this for myself, it is not just you. Do not have fabulous horses no one sees. The customer is not the enemy. PatO


    12 members found this post helpful.

  17. #37
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    Aug. 14, 2004
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    i think that as a buyer i am fairly easy - i want some pics (decent confo shots) and some video... but the video needs to be non shaky and the horse or pony needs to be close enough that i can see it - and the angle needs to be so that i can actually see the horse or pony - and also it needs to be longer that 5 seconds and NO SLO MO

    (you guys would be shocked at what i got as "video" when i was last looking!)

    on the other hand, as a seller, i want to only provide the minimum and i want the buyer to come out and try the horse..... but of course i am not (generally) selling 5 or 6 figure horses!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  18. #38
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    Apr. 1, 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by carnivalhill View Post
    Could we also add to this discussion input from buyers as to what they actually wish to see in a sales video? Specifically foals, yearlings? When buyers ask for more pictures, etc. what information are they really looking for?

    If the obvious conformation and movement has been demonstrated, what do you want/expect to see with additional materials, assuming that the videos and photos are clear and current? Of course there is always room for improvement, and we try our best, but there is only so much for babies to show. Any ideas as to what could be included would be helpful so maybe we could get things right the first time!
    With babies I want to see confirmation - front, side, back and video of movement - all 3 gaits (if possible). Last horse I purchase was at 3 months old in Holland and I went to see offspring of the stallion because I wanted to breed him to my mare. Since stallion was not available for a few days I went to a breeding farm and saw about 30 babies in 2 fields. The filly I ended up buying (best moving filly in the pasture) was out of the stallion I was interested in (not that I knew it at the time I was evaluating the babies).

    If she hadn't been held back by my abilities she'd be VERY competitive FEI by now. So thinking about buying another baby in a year or so (she has thyroid issues which I don't seem to be able to get under control - so although she gets pregnant she doesn't retain the fetus). :-(

    Also - I agree with mbm "the video needs to be non shaky and the horse or pony needs to be close enough that i can see it - and the angle needs to be so that i can actually see the horse or pony - and also it needs to be longer that 5 seconds and NO SLO MO".
    Sandy in Fla.



  19. #39
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    Aug. 26, 2003
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    Doesn't bother me at all - I LOVE photos of the horses, especially the foals. In fact my husband has received quite a few camera "gifts" from me, including a SUPER nice action lens. So for us, we do the pictures and video anyway, and it's something I love - editing photos is a fun hobby for me, I guess you could say. So when we are asked for video of X, Y, Z especially from people not within a driving distance, but even if they are closer I just don't mind. I figure what they may want to see, if I take the video and post - even if it doesn't result in the sale, others may find the videos helpful as well.

    I have also purchased sight unseen - including one inutero, and two I saw for the first time at shipping. I've also flown AND driven long distance to see horses - so it just depends on the situation for me. The last time we went to see a (more local) horse we came home with two!

    To the OP - I'm not sure your situation given the alter but it sounds like you do video and pictures and have a nice website. For me (as a buyer) that's quite important. What is a huge turn off for me are outdated websites with outdated FB pages full of bad photos. Or SOs that use a poorly stood up 3 y/o photo of their stallion to market him now at 9 years old. Good sites, good photos, and good marketing go a LONG way. Even with the outdated site, if I reach out for a more recent photo and get a head shot or something fairly useless in making a buying consideration, I'm NOT going to travel to see a horse that I have no clue what it even looks like and moves like today. Sure, maybe pleasantly surprised, or may be agast - either way before I book a plane I'm going to be 99.9% sure already what I'm going to see when I get off and already have a fairly good idea in mind that I'm buying.

    As a seller I feel the same way - if a buyer is traveling long distances, I want them to know exactly what they can expect to see when they pull in our driveway on that date so they don't have any surprises and haven't wasted a trip. We had someone interested in a foal where we had tons of video and photos but by the time they wanted to come out she had hit one of those gawky growth spurts, and had her winter woolies in full blast - a far cry different then inspection photos at 3 months. I took pictures of the yackling as is and sent them prior to their trip. Fortunately they understood young horses and growth spurts, came out and ended up buying her. But some buyers wouldn't know any better, and I don't want them to have any surprises, so I educate and update up front. My number 1 priority is for people to be happy with their purchases; however, for me it's not just about the sale because I do care so much about each of our animals.



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2007
    Posts
    58

    Default

    To OP:

    As someone who just recently purchased a 7 month old WB....
    If you aren't willing to at least accommodate requests for photos, I wouldn't consider coming to see your prospects. Let me explain why:

    I have traveled 100's of miles, searched countless internet websites and even flown to see nice babies. Most of the time, I was disappointed in what I saw in person BECAUSE the owners weren't willing (or unable) to produce adequate video and photos. I learned a valuable and expensive lesson....If the breeder/owner can't provide me with the visual images I need to make an educated "guess", I will no longer travel more than a few hours to see their prospects. I have literally spent THOUSANDS of dollars looking for a nice prospect for myself and hours of travel. As one of the other posters commented, our time is valuable too and some of us are willing to "gamble" big $$ on babies. I was willing to spend up to 20K on a rising yearling for example.

    So, don't discount buyers. You never know who may be looking out there and what they are willing to spend to buy your foals. You can weed-out the tire kickers pretty fast if you ask the right questions. The baby I ended up buying was from a breeder who accomodated EVERY request I had for pics/video and was happy to oblige. It just gave me a warm, open, honest feeling about her and her foals and I was right! The filly was everything she claimed her to be and she was great to work with as well.

    Hope this helps!


    1 members found this post helpful.

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