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  1. #81
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
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    Baltimore, MD
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    Ok, hopefully I won't regret this. Get off the computer and hand walk and hand graze as much as possible. Get the horse out of the stall either for a walk or for a ride a minimum of once per day every single day. Even Christmas. I trained race horses for 20 years and even the ones at the track got to come home to the farm several days a month for turnout but while they were at the track I did the next best thing and got them out of the stall as much as possible. And when they were in the stall they never went a single second without a pile of hay in front of them. I know you are a kid but you have taken on the responsibility of a horse so go do your job.


    10 members found this post helpful.

  2. #82
    Join Date
    May. 19, 2012
    Posts
    61

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    Already done! My routine is school, change clothes, barn. When I can't get out, I ask my trainer to lunge him. He doesn't go a day without doing something.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #83
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2010
    Location
    Satan's Steam Sauna
    Posts
    626

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    So, OP, I think the title of your original post probably set the tone for this thread. That said, I think everyone is baffled about the "no turnout" situation -- given that all indications are that the horse needs turnout. My impression is that you are boarding the horse at your trainer's place - is that correct? Are you actually paying money or working in exchange for your current setup?

    COTH is a great resource, and there are many very knowledgeable people that have replied here; but the horse's welfare has to be the priority. Ultimately, there is no amount of stall entertainment / enrichment that is going to make up for the lack of time OUT of the stall.

    You can ask show & race people about the daily schedules of their horses when they are at the shows or at the track - e.g. # of hours in stall, # of hours in work, etc. each day. How many hours a day is your horse stalled?

    IMO, you'd be better off asking for ideas/suggestions for places in your area that would be a better fit for your horse - or any horse. You sound intelligent, so you must know how mentally & physically unhealthy this is for your horse. Please apply yourself to finding a better setup for your horse -- NOW. COTH members will be invaluable when you are asking for help to do better by your horse; but they aren't going to pretend that the current setup is working for your horse, because it's not, and no amount of milk jugs, etc. will change that.
    Disclaimer: Just a beginner who knows nothing about nothing


    3 members found this post helpful.

  4. #84
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2004
    Location
    Carolinas
    Posts
    4,286

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    OP,don't know why or how you ended up with this horse and don't need to know. Based on your posts: you have a trainer and what sounds to be a decent barn except for no or limited turnout. You are interested in increasing your knowledge and experience - good. You talk about this horse and experiments, keeping a positive attitude I take it you are trying one thing at a time to see how the horse reacts and then adjusting. That I can appreciate, but if the horse himself is the experiment - not so good.
    Since you are asking for ideas here are some trainers and NH you should review. For the record you will find some make sense, some are way off base, some ideas will work now, others won't make sense of years. Good idea to hear what they have to say. What you use or don't use is up to you.
    Ray Hunt, Alois Podhajsky, Linda Tellington Jones, Buck Brannaman. There are a lot of Ray Hunt protégées out there. Also look for the book with title that sounds like 101 Long Line or Ground Exercises. This is a good start.
    Good luck.
    "Never do anything that you have to explain twice to the paramedics."
    Courtesy my cousin Tim



  5. #85
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2010
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    970

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    Quote Originally Posted by fooler View Post
    OP,don't know why or how you ended up with this horse and don't need to know. Based on your posts: you have a trainer and what sounds to be a decent barn except for no or limited turnout. You are interested in increasing your knowledge and experience - good. You talk about this horse and experiments, keeping a positive attitude I take it you are trying one thing at a time to see how the horse reacts and then adjusting. That I can appreciate, but if the horse himself is the experiment - not so good.
    Since you are asking for ideas here are some trainers and NH you should review. For the record you will find some make sense, some are way off base, some ideas will work now, others won't make sense of years. Good idea to hear what they have to say. What you use or don't use is up to you.
    Ray Hunt, Alois Podhajsky, Linda Tellington Jones, Buck Brannaman. There are a lot of Ray Hunt protégées out there. Also look for the book with title that sounds like 101 Long Line or Ground Exercises. This is a good start.
    Good luck.
    Here's a link to the book. I may even buy it for myself!

    http://www.horsekeeping.com/horse_bo..._Exercises.htm
    Alis volat propriis.



  6. #86
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
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    The only thing you could possibly put in the stall to make a real difference in your horse's pretty miserable existence is a hay net and maybe a mirror. Anything else is just to allay your guilt imo.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  7. #87
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2010
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    Satan's Steam Sauna
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    626

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    Quote Originally Posted by bluemooncowgirl View Post
    Here's a link to the book. I may even buy it for myself!

    http://www.horsekeeping.com/horse_bo..._Exercises.htm
    BlueMoonCowgirl & Fooler - I want to 3rd the Cherry Hill suggestion. I don't have the book mentioned, but I rely on her Horsekeeping Almanac in keeping mine at home.
    http://www.amazon.com/Cherry-Hills-H...204307&sr=1-10

    I'd definitely encourage OP to read Cherry Hill. And, my favorite horse resource books are by Jessica Jahiel, whose user name is Pasde2 on COTH; and I'd highly recommend OP send her a PM as she is in IL - similar climate to OP.

    Links to Jessica Jahiel sites-
    http://www.horse-sense.org/
    http://www.jessicajahiel.com/
    Disclaimer: Just a beginner who knows nothing about nothing



  8. #88
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2009
    Posts
    233

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    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    The only thing you could possibly put in the stall to make a real difference in your horse's pretty miserable existence is a hay net and maybe a mirror. Anything else is just to allay your guilt imo.
    Even those do not make up for no turnout.
    DD's mare would be a walking basket case without at least 8 hours turnout.
    I can't help but think that the horse would be better off some where else.
    Just MHO.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #89
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2004
    Location
    Carolinas
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    4,286

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    Agree with all that most horses are happier with turnout. Also agree it could be better for both if the horse had another home.
    HOWEVER... Based solely on info from the OP, this is essentially a feral or untrained horse. We all know the likely fate for such a horse if put on the market as is. Since the OP is with a trainer and "appears" willing to work and learn with the horse, why don't we offer advice/direction for improvement.
    "Never do anything that you have to explain twice to the paramedics."
    Courtesy my cousin Tim


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #90
    Join Date
    May. 19, 2012
    Posts
    61

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    I am boarding at my trainer's place. During summers, I work part of my board, but in winter, when hay prices get high, I pay full price. That isn't the only reason I'm staying. There are a variety of deeply personal reasons, none of which I'm comfortable sharing with the internet. Sorry

    He's stalled anywhere from 21 to 23 hours a day, with the remainder spent in work or just chilling out of his stall.

    I've read articles written by many of the people you define, Fooler, and I've also read through 101 Long Line exercises. My trainer has a copy and I'm slowly working through them. He's not the calmest horse on the ground, and is much better and braver under saddle, so it's been slow going. LOVE Cherry Hill.

    There is always a better home out there. I know I'm not the perfect horse owner, and I never will be. The horse was given to my trainers because of his sometimes aggressive and always spooky nature. He isn't feral or wild, but we think the person who started him skipped the ground work. On the ground, he can be frightening. Under saddle, he's more tractable.

    Just so you all know, I'm going to college in the fall and bringing him with, so he'll get a nice nine months of barefoot and 12 hours of pasture a day.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #91
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2004
    Location
    Carolinas
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    4,286

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    Don't stop with the articles, read their books, a great deal of knowledge housed in just those four minds. TTouch, developed by Linda Tellington Jones may be of help as you work with this horse on the ground.
    In 6 months you plan to be at college along with your horse. What we "know" college will be and how we actually live at college is normally totally different. You want to make as much progress as possible while you have the current support system. Because you won't have all of the time you expect to have once you are college.
    Again good luck.
    "Never do anything that you have to explain twice to the paramedics."
    Courtesy my cousin Tim


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #92
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2008
    Location
    now in KCMO, and plan to stay there
    Posts
    2,865

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    Thanks for explaining more. Does your trainer's setup not even have a paddock, not a huge pasture, but big enough a horse could walk around some in it? You mentioned the horse is hard to catch, but if the critter were to be able to stretch its legs some, and then be 'caught' for the purpose of eating some yummy grain, that might ameliorate the hard to catch issue. Good luck and keep us posted.
    Jeanie
    RIP Sasha, best dog ever, pictured shortly before she died, Death either by euthanasia or natural causes is only the end of the animal inhabiting its body; I believe the spirit lives on.



  13. #93
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2010
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    Satan's Steam Sauna
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    OP - Thanks for clarifying, and obviously, you are under no obligation to share more than you are comfortable with.

    Honestly, I can't grasp how the horses are not literally climbing the walls. Many (maybe most) very experienced horse people are beyond challenged when they have a horse that must be on stall rest due to a medical necessity.

    I am very much a beginner w/ 2 older, experienced, calm, lazy, safe horses who are not in work; so I certainly can't offer any expertise. My biggest challenge thus far has been stalling them for a week during a hurricane evacuation, and thankfully, the horse hotel had an unused pasture that we ended up being able to use for 12+ hours a day. After a 6+ hour trailer ride followed by 12 hours stalled next to each other, THEY WERE DONE w/ confinement and made it clear.

    So, I guess my thought is that I think it would be impossible to really assess a horse if the horse was stalled 23 hours a day for an extended period of time. My current setup allows them to wander their 8 acre pasture w/ a flock of sheep and come into the barn at will, and even they have "Spring Fever" this week.

    Just please be very careful & cautious. I worry for your safety working with horses that are confined so much - based on my own experiences with my lazy oldies who were wall climbers after 12 hours in a stall.

    I'm not blaming you, but I cannot fathom that other horse owners are paying to board horses with this trainer when the horses are confined that much. The whole setup is very weird to me; that's for sure.
    Disclaimer: Just a beginner who knows nothing about nothing



  14. #94
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2002
    Posts
    2,518

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    Blue barrel in a corner. We had a half a blue barrel, and used it to put hay in in the corner of the stall...horse was so afraid of it he wouldn't eat the hay in it. He did eventually get over it...



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