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  1. #81
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    Jan. 21, 2007
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    In the South, ya'll.
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    Quote Originally Posted by PNWjumper View Post

    As for the control issues. I'll use my own kid (who just turned 5) as an example of a kid who has the ability to control her pony, but isn't necessarily ready for walk/trot. She walks and trots in my (closed) arena all by herself on her pony. She goes on trail rides with me and walks and trots on the trail. She canters on the lunge line because she's not strong enough to make (lazy, willful) pony canter without a little assistance. But she's pretty solid in the control department (here she is trotting poles on her own). I don't think I would put her in a walk/trot class because she doesn't have posting worked out...mostly because she spends the majority of her riding time on a bareback pad and stirrupless with the exception of her weekly lessons (and mainly because I want her to get a good feel of the pony/horse without being forced into the somewhat awkward position that saddles tend to put small children into). SHE would LOVE to go in a walk class at a show, and I wouldn't hesitate to put her in one at a show that I was already going to.

    Is it a sign of the coming horse-pocalypse? Maybe. But am I glad that my kid gets to do more than leadline? Absolutely!
    Slightly off topic, but that picture just made me smile on what has been a rough Monday so far.
    Worry, doubt, fear and despair are the enemies which slowly bring us down to the ground and turn us to dust before we die.

    ~ Douglas MacArthur


    7 members found this post helpful.

  2. #82
    Join Date
    Dec. 22, 2000
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    NY
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    14,959

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    Quote Originally Posted by PNWjumper View Post
    Off topic, but....

    Holy cow! What a cute picture!

    And I bet she will develop a great seat by learning to ride without a regular saddle.



  3. #83
    Join Date
    Nov. 17, 2006
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    3,829

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    Well said, PNWjumper. And your little one on her pony is ADORABLE!
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    ¯ Oscar Wilde



  4. #84
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2003
    Location
    CA
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    10,805

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    Quote Originally Posted by Calvincrowe View Post
    They started a non-rated "show within a show" here in Portland (well, at Huntercreek). Since the A shows have lost a fair number of competitors with the economic down turn, and the ring is available, this is making wonderful sense for the trainers, clients and show management. For example, our barn sent several horses to show all week in the A show rings (rated) and then, on the weekend, more of our clients came in to show in the local/non-rated ring.
    Pebble Beach used to do that. It's a great idea, but it can be misleading when kid/parent/trainer says they show at Pebble Beach, but don't clarify it's the non-rated schooling show that doesn't go above 2'6". It's a lovely way for the unscrupulous to exaggerate their accomplishments/abilities to the unsuspecting.
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"



  5. #85
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2010
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    4,338

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    I want that pony!!!



  6. #86
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 1999
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    Mendocino County, CA: Turkey Vulture HQ
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    14,441

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2bayboys View Post
    From what I've seen of these, the classes are populated by the children, grandchildren, and siblings of those people who are already at the show as trainers and exhibitors. Clearly the participants in the class and the parents paying for them wouldn't be doing so if they did not want the class to exist.

    The children and ponies are beautifully turned out and the class is judged as an equitation class.

    I'm not sure what there is to be offended about it?
    If it's about getting the kids in the ring and getting them to participate - remembering that the kids are too small to do anything on their own - I would personally prefer that turnout not be a consideration or requirement for the class. Otherwise, the class is more about the grownups.

    I admit that it's really fun to dress up your kids in mini show clothes and get the pony all dressed up and take pictures... but I try not to pretend it is for my daughter's benefit. :-)
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #87
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2013
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
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    259

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    Quote Originally Posted by PNWjumper View Post
    here she is trotting poles on her own)
    Too freaking cute! And I love her little face here, she looks both determined, and so happy!



  8. #88
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2003
    Location
    Windward Farm, Washougal, WA- our work in progress, our money pit, our home!
    Posts
    6,840

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    Horseymama-

    The Bedrock shows at Huntercreek were new last year, and used the small hunter ring on Saturday only (schooling available on Friday after the A show ended). Since the Saturday A show used the jumper, big hunter and regular hunter rings only, that left the small hunter ring on the far side open for the schooling show. There were close to 60 competitors entered in the schooling show during each of the 3 shows offered (June, July, August) in conjunction with the bigger A offerings. According to all involved, it was a smooth, unobtrusive event. My horse, an old campaigner, introduced a young lady to the atmosphere of the "big show" without the cost (no braiding required, no week long stay). We all wore hunt coats, and there wasn't a shaggy pony in sight. No one wandered into the big rings or got in the way out in the warmup areas. The ribbons and prizes were different than the A show versions. The competition was very good--people brought their, um, "A game" to this, as it felt much bigger and fancier than a typical local/schooling show. Though, in the PDX area, the Local show divisions are quite well filled with very good shows/facilities and are growing steadily as the A shows price the average rider out of the show scene.

    I rode in the show-in-a-show later in the year and really enjoyed being back in the "A show rings". I can't afford to show A system anymore, and my horse is a bit too animated to place well in good company at that level, so we stick to the local scene. I think this idea is a great one. There are many of us older ladies who have stepped down to 2'6" to 2'9" or those who aren't ready to step up to the 3'. We have a damn good time, are very competitive with one another and most of us have been there and paid those A show bills.
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!


    5 members found this post helpful.

  9. #89
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2009
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    South Central: Zone 7
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    1,960

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    At HITS or another AA rated show? Probably not a class that really belongs in that setting. However, I am all for having these types of classes/divisions at small schooling or in-barn shows.

    At my "in-barn" shows, I offer walk/trot ground poles, cross bars, 2' and 2'3"/2'6" divisions. That way my kiddos can get some experience before they head out to bigger schooling shows or rated shows.



  10. #90
    Join Date
    Jan. 11, 2010
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    Near the beach
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    442

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    I'm with the camp that doesn't like this type of thing for an A show. I do believe it is dumbing down the sport and increasing the drugging of horses, since people are in such a rush to show instead of learning to ride well enough first. Can't ride a "spirited" horse, let's drug him. Can't do 3'6", make the fences smaller. Can't post yet... no problem, do the walk class. Guess I'm old school, where you only showed A if you were capable of not embarrassing yourself.
    Back in the day, we started riding in Pony Club and did everything under the sun on them before we were competing in horse shows- rode backwards bareback, galloped cross-country, stood up, took jumps no hands, swam - fell off more often then we stayed on probably, but it taught us to really ride and not just pose on the horse's back. Don't even get me started on the pony jocks' show bows...
    I'm not looking down my nose at this sort of thing... this only applies to the A shows - not local or schooling shows. There is a place to work out nerves for both riders and horses and gain experience.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  11. #91
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    Jan. 26, 2013
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    342

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    Quote Originally Posted by ridingagain View Post
    I'm with the camp that doesn't like this type of thing for an A show. I do believe it is dumbing down the sport and increasing the drugging of horses, since people are in such a rush to show instead of learning to ride well enough first. Can't ride a "spirited" horse, let's drug him. Can't do 3'6", make the fences smaller. Can't post yet... no problem, do the walk class. Guess I'm old school, where you only showed A if you were capable of not embarrassing yourself.
    Back in the day, we started riding in Pony Club and did everything under the sun on them before we were competing in horse shows- rode backwards bareback, galloped cross-country, stood up, took jumps no hands, swam - fell off more often then we stayed on probably, but it taught us to really ride and not just pose on the horse's back. Don't even get me started on the pony jocks' show bows...
    I'm not looking down my nose at this sort of thing... this only applies to the A shows - not local or schooling shows. There is a place to work out nerves for both riders and horses and gain experience.
    Exactly, Schooling shows, B & C shows these use to be the backbone of the sport. Where people learned to ride, to show, and people worked HARD so they could MOVE UP. Now people stagnate at 2'6 and 3'. And can brag that they showed at Harrisburg, Devon, Washington etc. It's really sad.
    My other pet peeve of this generation is winter showing anyway. Remember when we would finish in November, give your horse off until after Thanksgiving, Fox Hunt a little in December (Christmas Day Hunt! was so much fun) take your shoes off in January and let them out until the middle of February and then started getting them back in shape for the Spring Season. If you couldn't make it to Devon in 3 months you probably didn't deserve to be there! I know I'm old


    6 members found this post helpful.

  12. #92
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2010
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    california
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    I see horseshows as showing a skill set. I did have my daughter show once in walk trot, it was a way to get her to her first show and see. She had been taking lessons for over a year and she worked with her trainer on lining up positioning her horse as well as equitation. She showed in a flat class next time and cross rails her third time. It was our local horseclub shows.

    I don't see "Beginner Walk" as any real skill set. A class to dress up little kids on ponies, more likely.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #93
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2007
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    Pacific Northwest
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    633

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    I guess the next thing is Beginner Stand. someone just leads them into the arena and parks them all in a line in the middle. The announcer announces the start of the class, and we all watch for one minute. Then the announcer announces the end of the class. The judge walks out and pins them 1 thru 9. What a racket. Who says horse show managers cannot legally steal.
    Discipline is the Bridge between Dreams and Accomplishments


    4 members found this post helpful.

  14. #94
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2002
    Location
    Indiana
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    11,101

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    I guess you'd have to ask all those 2' 6" riders if they have any desire to show hire before you put on your judgy pants. Some riders are limited in height due to time, money, courage, or horse. Maybe they're on an older horse who can't take the wear and tear, or they can't afford a horse with the step, or they work full time, or maybe those bigger fences just look scary.

    The type of horse and the training required for the bigger classes can be way out of someone's budget.

    If they want to spend their money on an A show why not let them?


    4 members found this post helpful.

  15. #95
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    Jun. 10, 2009
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    1,683

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    Our barn hosted a local show series and we had an entire division of walk only classes complete with year end award. It took forever to get through 3 flat classes of walking in a row. And then the walk trot classes. It was certainly a long start to the morning, but it was indeed lucrative.



  16. #96
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 2008
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    Somewhere over the rainbow
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    317

    Default Is that a marathon or a parade?

    I don't show now, but this used to be my world (mostly local shows for all the old fashioned reasons ) and I still care about the sport. I use the word "sport" very intentionally I do sympathize with most of the arguments for why this class/division is ok, but here's an analogy to help illustrate what I think are the problems with Blue Ribbon$$$ for everyone:

    College used to be for people who were brainy, worked hard in school and had a way to cover the cost whether through parents, work, or scholarship. Now anyone can be registered at a university by spending a few minutes on the computer before going to bed. Grade inflation is so out of control at many schools and in many classes, one barely needs to learn a dang thing to not only pass, but get a nice B grade. Getting an A takes little more. Universities have discovered by being less competitive they can have more students, follow the for-profit world model of never ending growth and make more money.

    But the value of having a degree has been devalued in the marketplace to near worthlessness. At best, it's a step towards actual qualifications and at worst it's a liability in the eyes of those hiring managers who've become jaded against that system and a crippling financial burden to the student. Increasingly, "valuable" degrees are those which used to be vocational tracks, and it all just seems like a weird, long con to separate people from their money. Endless classes,majors and certifications all costing more than a middle class income, and yet all basically meaningless.

    Sound familiar? In fact, maybe the next big thing in the AA's will be loan programs. That will address criticism it's just for the people who can pay the most, right?

    I'm not at all convinced kids will lose interest in participating in shows that are harder to qualify for. It's tricky, but I'm sure there's a way to get people to the shows, feel involved and still maintain the integrity of the sport.

    (For transparency's sake: I have a BA from a still-competitive university and later followed one of those professional/vocational tracks at a local state U.)
    An auto-save saved my post.

    I might be a cylon


    4 members found this post helpful.

  17. #97
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    Dec. 12, 2009
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    675

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    One thing I do want to add after looking at results is that WEF has this class, but most if not all of the kids also do the walk/trot and walk/trot jump. Not sure if this is the case with Thermal, but in Palm Beach the point of the class seems to be a warm up rather than a parade.



  18. #98
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2007
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    California
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    3,798

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    Quote Originally Posted by HillnDale View Post
    but here's an analogy to help illustrate what I think are the problems with Blue Ribbon$$$ for everyone:

    A tad flaw in your calculations - the riders were not all given a blue ribbon.
    How people treat you is their KARMA.... how you REACT is yours!



  19. #99
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2010
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    california
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    4,139

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    Quote Originally Posted by iEquitate View Post
    One thing I do want to add after looking at results is that WEF has this class, but most if not all of the kids also do the walk/trot and walk/trot jump. Not sure if this is the case with Thermal, but in Palm Beach the point of the class seems to be a warm up rather than a parade.
    So if you compete in walk/trot & cross rails why would you cross enter in "Beginers Walk" ? And why would anyone need a "walk" class to warm up ? Learning how to warm up is part of showing.....


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #100
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    Dec. 12, 2009
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    675

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    Quote Originally Posted by stolen virtue View Post
    So if you compete in walk/trot & cross rails why would you cross enter in "Beginers Walk" ? And why would anyone need a "walk" class to warm up ? Learning how to warm up is part of showing.....
    I think it's part of a beginner division which only trots over poles, and the walk is just one class not an entire division. I can't explain it beyond that, I just know it's not an entire division of three or four walks.



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