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View Poll Results: How much is $1000 to you?

Voters
301. You may not vote on this poll
  • Nothing much, I have that in petty cash

    65 21.59%
  • It's substantial, but I can manage

    168 55.81%
  • If we eat Ramen for months, we can wing it

    42 13.95%
  • I'd be turned away from the Poor House for being too broke

    26 8.64%
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Results 61 to 80 of 167
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Jul. 28, 2004
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    Texas
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    1,986

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    I have a neighbor who has a ranch that is 2000 plus acres, and that family is extremely wealthy. On that ranch, in addition to multiple houses, indoor basketball court, swimming pool, etc etc, they have 12 or so trail horses. Their foreman asked me to come over one day to look at an old sick horse. The horse was in terrible shape, could hardly stand, and I said the best thing to do would be to put it down. The ranch owner was never going to pay big vet bills for it. Guess what, the few times I saw the foreman, he said the horse was still being kept alive. This is not a financial problem, folks, it is an asshat problem. As I said in an earlier post, the auction house is minutes away from here. There goes your argument that this horse would have a better death with slaughter.

    Did euthanizing dogs and cats solve the overbreeding problem? Some people will not do the right thing. They breed, they will not euth. For one thing, there needs to be public awareness against this culture of breeding pets and horses. For another thing, euth needs to be made a more "acceptable" alternative.

    OP is asking the wrong question, which should be "do you figure a possible expenditure for euth into your decision to own a horse"?
    friend of bar.ka


    2 members found this post helpful.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2009
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,667

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post

    Yes, I am trying to get a gauge on the financial means.
    There are a lot of people who talk a good game but I suspect when the rubber meets the road they have a lot less to offer past their big words.

    .
    So what is the purpose of this? Why is it your business? You say it isn't about euthenasia, colic surgery, or any of that. Because there is a big difference in coming up with $500-$1,000 for something NEEDED then say going to the casino or shopping.


    9 members found this post helpful.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Jun. 27, 2005
    Location
    KY
    Posts
    4,648

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    I spent over 500 on one of my cats last year and ended up having to put him down anyways.

    Now if they had cat slaughter perhaps I could have squeezed 5 bucks out of him being a renewable resource.

    But as such option does not exist, I as the owner and care taker was responsible for these expenses. Which would be the same for my horses.
    Unlike the pro slaughter peeps who think someone else should be responsible for the financial burden of euthanizing a horse, if slaughter was taken away as an option.

    Carry on.....

    ************************
    \"Horses lend us the wings we lack\"


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2004
    Location
    Catonsville, MD
    Posts
    6,894

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    Unfortunately, euthanasia isn't that expensive here, but disposal is very expensive (over $500, last I heard) in the DC metro area, so I don't think that $1000 is as far off as some are claiming.

    However, it is just simply the end we owe animals that work for us. It is a classic cost of doing business. It seems inevitable to me that if slaughter were to be repermitted in the U.S., it would be one more pernicious incentive in favor of indiscriminate breeding, since the risk of breeding a 'cull' would be offset by the value of unwanted horses on the domestic slaughter market. I think that is the wrong public policy message to send. I am perfectly happy for there to be little value to unwanted horses, because as many as there are now, there would be a hell of a lot more if people thought they could sell 'em for meat if they couldn't do their jobs or got too expensive to keep around.

    If you don't like the cost structure of the horse business, O.P., then maybe you need to leave it.
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09



    3 members found this post helpful.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    12,607

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lori B View Post
    If you don't like the cost structure of the horse business, O.P., then maybe you need to leave it.
    The OP doesn't own any horses.



  6. #66
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2007
    Location
    Heaven on Earth--Sonoma County, CA
    Posts
    1,547

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    Just to add to the conversation ( which I agree is specious, but I do think its important to point out how different things are around the country) last on farm euth here was $250 for the euth and $375 for the haul away. Burying on site is illegal and carries hefty fines (thousands of dollars). I have it and always will.

    However, as a trainer, these aren't the costs that make my business hard. I mean, they aren't nothing, but they aren't the major hardship. Those would be the rising cost of feed, the clients who routinely don't pay (and right as you reach the threshold for when you can put a lien on their horse, pay in full--yes, you can boot them, but you still have to recover from carrying an extra horse), the rising codt of routine vet bills and the general vagaries of the business (today's hero is tomorrow's chump ). It's not euthing the oldsters that's the problem, lol.
    Phoenix Farm ~ Breeding-Training-Sales
    Eventing, Dressage, Young Horses
    www.phoenixsporthorses.com
    Check out my new blog: http://califcountrymom.blogspot.com


    3 members found this post helpful.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2004
    Location
    South Park
    Posts
    3,182

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    So I am wondering, who of the COTH people can actually afford to just eat 1000 bucks (admittedly on the higher end of disposal) without tearing a major hole into the budget? "
    I know my fellow COTHers. They cannot follow instructions, cannot follow an argument if their life depended on it.
    http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...6070-Fruitbats
    A friend told me I was delusional. I almost fell off my unicorn.



  8. #68
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    5,307

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    We've never had to spend money to put down one of our horses unless you count the bullet. Nor have we ever sold a horse at a sale. DH has taken care of them on his own, borrowed a back hoe from the neighbor, one we sold to a guy that slaughtered the horse to feed his mink, and one the guy took the horse's body for the hide and disposed of the rest after DH put her down. No fun, it's not for the faint of heart, but he's old school that way.

    If, however, one of our young healthy horses needed a $1500 surgery we'd do it. We don't have that money just sitting around collecting dust but we do have the means to get it. We aren't rolling in money but I always have a little financial safety net that I can get to if I need to. I wouldn't spend it on euthanasia though.



  9. #69
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2005
    Location
    Lancaster, PA
    Posts
    4,866

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    I don't own a horse, but I have a cash emergency fund (well, in a savings account) that is enough to cover 6 months of expenses. If I owned a horse, that money would also be used to cover emergency vet expenses and/or euth & disposal. (And I would probably sock away more into that account before actually acquiring a horse.)

    IMHO, anyone should have an emergency fund in place for themselves and then for an animal before getting that animal. I know lots of people don't. But they should.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,431

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    I *HAVE* it, sure (I have realized working at hourly jobs my idea of a reasonable checking account is much higher than some people's) but when it comes to some things I'm less likely to spend it than on others if I've got a cheaper alternative available.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    31,900

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    remind me never to go on a trail ride with you guys:
    you take the Chief Ladiga/Silver Comet trail and end up in Canada.....
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  12. #72
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Packing my bags
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    Quote Originally Posted by Couture TB View Post
    So what is the purpose of this? Why is it your business? You say it isn't about euthenasia, colic surgery, or any of that. Because there is a big difference in coming up with $500-$1,000 for something NEEDED then say going to the casino or shopping.

    actually it does not matter what it is for.
    a thousand buck is just that.

    If it is something you need, you find means to provide it, if it something frivolous, well....it depends then.
    Discretionary funds. outside the budget for regular things.
    How much is a thousand dollars to you?

    Is it much or little, really no big problem here? Simple question.

    You got vet bills and euthanasia....certainly not things you can put off until the stocking is full (though the service provider might agree on payments)

    That new show outfit...one should be able to take it or leave it, no?
    (and I am taking into consideration that some show shirt run about as high there...same with show pads)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  13. #73
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Location
    Mass.
    Posts
    6,634

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    No, I don't have that in cash lying around. But I have room on my credit card to cover a pet emergency.
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2004
    Location
    Piedmont Triad, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,305

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    Good Grief !! Ask a simple question and Coth actually explodes!

    OP just asked if $1000 was available and how much it would hurt.

    To me $1000 is like a fire extingusher. Life happens and one should be prepared for it. Trailer tires blow out, water heater leaks, Horses colic and need a vet at 11pm Saturday night. The farm call is after hours emergency $$$. I've known all of this. Everybody should be prepared with some amount of money for emergency. Living pay check to pay check without a buffer is irresponsible and stupid. Stupid because life WILL happen. A Harsh sentiment but life is harsh.

    The $1000 is merely an arbitrary number. Depending on your financial resources, it could be $50 or $50,000. $1000 should cover most ordinary "life happens"

    So to answer the question: Yes, I have $1000 in my checking account that is a buffer. Yes, it would hurt to spend it because there are so many other desires.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2008
    Location
    Snohomish, WA
    Posts
    4,015

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    In some other cultures its not considered macho to neuter your male animals.

    Quote Originally Posted by ToTheNines View Post
    I have a neighbor who has a ranch that is 2000 plus acres, and that family is extremely wealthy. On that ranch, in addition to multiple houses, indoor basketball court, swimming pool, etc etc, they have 12 or so trail horses. Their foreman asked me to come over one day to look at an old sick horse. The horse was in terrible shape, could hardly stand, and I said the best thing to do would be to put it down. The ranch owner was never going to pay big vet bills for it. Guess what, the few times I saw the foreman, he said the horse was still being kept alive. This is not a financial problem, folks, it is an asshat problem. As I said in an earlier post, the auction house is minutes away from here. There goes your argument that this horse would have a better death with slaughter.

    Did euthanizing dogs and cats solve the overbreeding problem? Some people will not do the right thing. They breed, they will not euth. For one thing, there needs to be public awareness against this culture of breeding pets and horses. For another thing, euth needs to be made a more "acceptable" alternative.

    OP is asking the wrong question, which should be "do you figure a possible expenditure for euth into your decision to own a horse"?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #76
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2012
    Posts
    4,249

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    Quote Originally Posted by hosspuller View Post
    Good Grief !! Ask a simple question and Coth actually explodes!

    OP just asked if $1000 was available and how much it would hurt.

    To me $1000 is like a fire extingusher. Life happens and one should be prepared for it. Trailer tires blow out, water heater leaks, Horses colic and need a vet at 11pm Saturday night. The farm call is after hours emergency $$$. I've known all of this. Everybody should be prepared with some amount of money for emergency. Living pay check to pay check without a buffer is irresponsible and stupid. Stupid because life WILL happen. A Harsh sentiment but life is harsh.

    The $1000 is merely an arbitrary number. Depending on your financial resources, it could be $50 or $50,000. $1000 should cover most ordinary "life happens"

    So to answer the question: Yes, I have $1000 in my checking account that is a buffer. Yes, it would hurt to spend it because there are so many other desires.
    THIS!!! And Thank You! You said it better than I could.

    Enough to make me feel "safe?":

    Disposal expense for a horse ($850.00 + vet, hereabouts);
    Deductible on privately-purchased major medical/accident insurance ($5,000.00, anyone?!);
    The cost of the next truckload of hay ($3,500.00);
    AND, yes, that "sh*t happens" ($1,500.00).

    Plus, a high-limit credit card that would cover colic surgery, all of which is IN ADDITION TO the Suze Orman-recommended year's income, invested in a fund that pays a good return.

    Mind you, I'm one of the poor horse owners 'round here! 'Fore y'all get feelin' too sorry for yerselves . . .


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #77
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,287

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    anyone who thinks the question isn't the OP's business is free not to answer!

    for what it's worth, I've known folks who seemed to have way more than what I have (bigger house, new cars, etc) but obviously they didn't have cash laying around for emergencies because when one would come up they'd be all up in a panic. So the question was a valid one. Having available CASH at your fingertips is not necessarily tied to your income.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  18. #78
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2011
    Posts
    1,096

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    Quote Originally Posted by MoonoverMississippi View Post
    It's a substanttial amount, but we have more than that in an emergency fund (thanks, Dave Ramsey!) for such situations.
    SO is all about Dave Ramsey and has converted me, too. $1000 would be a hit but I could handle it. While I disagree with him politically, Dave has gotten me to what I think is a great place financially, especially for my age.
    "A horse gallops with his lungs, perseveres with his heart, and wins with his character." - Tesio


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #79
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2001
    Location
    Lemont, Il, USA
    Posts
    640

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    Quote Originally Posted by tidy wabbit View Post
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but it's my understand that OP has never owned a horse, and does not own one now, and has never been responsible for a horse. And does not ride. So I'm wondering why she'd ask the question? In Germany, where OP says she is from, they eat horses. Pferde for dinner.
    Is this really true? Why on EARTH would anybody pay one iota of attention to this person.


    13 members found this post helpful.

  20. #80
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2009
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    594

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    I personally do not have much cash of my own. I'm working for my board and upkeep and am partially supported by my parents in case of an emergency (I'll be a freshman in college next year, currently on a gap year). I do not have a CC that I pay myself, just my I.C.E. card.

    That being said, both of my parents are very well off, in the range of my mother not needing to work at all and still able to support 2 horses of her own, and various other activities with plenty of money to spare. That does not mean she always has cash on hand. She carefully budgest her money to have as little as possible liquidated for maximum income. Can she get cash if she needs it? Yes, but it requires several calls and some complications, not just writing a cheque. My dad keeps even less than her liquidated but again, he can come up with cash if he needs it.



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