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  1. #1
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    Oct. 25, 2005
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    Question No See'ums and clay in Georgia

    I live in "gnat heaven--South Georgia" and have 2 guys (+ me for them) that suffer with the no-see'ums and our sandy soil from May till September. A friend above the gnat line with very clay type soil has offered to take them for the summer to see if they do any better. My question is, do you guys in North Ga have horses that suffer with the no-see'ums? Do you think they may do better up there?



  2. #2
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    Aug. 7, 2005
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    Georgia
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    Quote Originally Posted by paintjumper View Post
    I live in "gnat heaven--South Georgia" and have 2 guys (+ me for them) that suffer with the no-see'ums and our sandy soil from May till September. A friend above the gnat line with very clay type soil has offered to take them for the summer to see if they do any better. My question is, do you guys in North Ga have horses that suffer with the no-see'ums? Do you think they may do better up there?
    I don't think the soil type has anything to do with it. I'm in west central Ga. with the red clay and we have them.
    North Ga. may not. Sorry I don't know that.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.



  3. #3
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    Oct. 10, 2007
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    down south
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    I live in north east ga and we have them here. Truthfully the best thing that kept them away from my boys is the freedom 45 spots. Worked wonders and all summer I never had a tail swish and I stopped using fly spray all together. They for sure will be back on them this spring.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  4. #4
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    Dec. 19, 2009
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    Pennsylvania
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    I know I'm in PA now, but formerly from McIntosh Co GA as well as Wayne Co GA... Even the difference between those two counties was very big.
    I'll say that the further inland you can get the horses the better off they will be. Wayne Co was not too bad unless you were near water. McIntosh, well I couldn't name a location anywhere in the county where you'd be safe from them.
    We called them 'sand gnats'. Folks from all over will tell you 'we have them here' but until you live along the coast and experience true SAND GNATS, until you have been covered in thousands of little bites, have spent the evening waving your arms and run screaming back into the house, or galloped madly back to the barn, you don't have any idea how brutal of an experience they are, especially if a horse (or person) is allergic. I know of several horses who had to move inland to get away from the gnats so if it's a situation that would work for you I say give it a try.

    Alternatively, being stalled during dusk/dawn with fans might work too. Luckily, while I was there, my ponies/horses were not allergic, but they sure got their exercise doing the "gnat walk-trot" during dusk and dawn to escape them.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2009
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    Default

    I live on red clay in the SE. LOTS of those no see ums here.

    Right now the gnats are out. Even with the 18-25 winds of today, the gnats are out in force.



  6. #6
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    Oct. 25, 2005
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    Default Well.....shoot.

    Thanks guys. The reason I was hoping the clay would keep them out of the area is that the gnats we have during the summer that cover your eyes, mouth, and ears but don't bite only raise their young in sandy soil. I was hoping the biting no see'ums were the same way. I guess it will be stalls during the evenings/nights/day break and out during the day for them. Thanks again.



  7. #7
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    Aug. 7, 2005
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    Georgia
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    Quote Originally Posted by rabicon View Post
    I live in north east ga and we have them here. Truthfully the best thing that kept them away from my boys is the freedom 45 spots. Worked wonders and all summer I never had a tail swish and I stopped using fly spray all together. They for sure will be back on them this spring.
    Not to hijack the thread but I am curious about the freedom 45 spots.
    If you have applied that and then HAVE to have fly spray can you use it or do you find it keeps all types of flies off of the horses.
    Also may I ask where you get it and apprx. cost?
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.



  8. #8
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    Oct. 25, 2005
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    Default I got it at Tractor Supply last year

    It may have helped a bit but my guys were still covered in scabs but I began it after they already were scratchy. I think its about $25 for a 12 week supply.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2004
    Location
    Carolinas
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    Agree with Oldpony66 - the gnats further inland and north are no where as bad as the "horrible sand" creatures closer to the coasts.

    What worked for my very allergic gelding is - behind fans from apx 4pm to 9am, out during the heat of the day (when it is too hot for the gnats), a full shower before going in for the night (prime feeding time for the gnats), full fly sheets+neck cover+ fly mask. Can't use fly spray as he is allergic to that. But will spray the sheets which helps.

    Haven't tried the spot on products for the horses. . .yet.
    "Never do anything that you have to explain twice to the paramedics."
    Courtesy my cousin Tim



  10. #10
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    Oct. 10, 2007
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    down south
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    Quote Originally Posted by pj View Post
    Not to hijack the thread but I am curious about the freedom 45 spots.
    If you have applied that and then HAVE to have fly spray can you use it or do you find it keeps all types of flies off of the horses.
    Also may I ask where you get it and apprx. cost?

    The only time i use fly spray with it is if we go in the woods for a trail ride. Usually just put it underneath their bellies and around the tail area. You can use fly spray if needed but I haven't needed to really. On trails is just an extra precaution because bugs can be soooo bad in the woods around here, where we ride on trails have creeks and rivers so it makes it worse.

    I have found that it keeps everything off of them even ticks. About 3 acres of our pasture is woods and we had bad tick problems. Once i started the spots I never saw another tick on them. It really has been a God send for my boys. The vet and farrier even asked what I was doing because they would come and not one tail swish and nothing around the horses. Vet got them for his cows lol. I get it at tractor supply but you can order then from any horse supply company. You get 5 in a pack I believe and it's about 20.00 a pack. One tube a month. I did notice that after the second treatment it really kicked it and I had no problems. The first treatment did good but it took the second to really show a huge difference. Having 4 it runs me about the same a month as it did buying the expensive fly sprays that didn't work really at all around here.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2007
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    down south
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    Just to add, you have to keep the month schedule though. I notice if I miss a day or 2 the bugs and flies are back until I retreat. I usually apply it the day before they are do on the calendar to keep all good
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  12. #12
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    Aug. 7, 2005
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    Georgia
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    Thank you so much for the information. I think I'm going to give it a shot.
    OP, I hope you find something that works for you. Good luck.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.



  13. #13

    Default No-see-ums

    Quote Originally Posted by paintjumper View Post
    I live in "gnat heaven--South Georgia" and have 2 guys (+ me for them) that suffer with the no-see'ums and our sandy soil from May till September. A friend above the gnat line with very clay type soil has offered to take them for the summer to see if they do any better. My question is, do you guys in North Ga have horses that suffer with the no-see'ums? Do you think they may do better up there?
    The larvae are primarily freshwater aquatic, so if you have wet areas (e.g. streams, marshes (primarily freshwater), swampy areas), you have ceratopogonids. No-see-ums (common name for some members of the family of flies) occur throughout temperate North America. Some of the worse experiences I've had are in Arkansas and Georgia. IMO, the spot-ons, when used regularly are the best for a sensitive horse. I also use fly sheets (must be a tight mesh) with a belly compartment.



  14. #14
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    Oct. 25, 2005
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    Default Thanks guys......

    Looks like we have another long summer ahead of us



  15. #15
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    Aug. 7, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by paintjumper View Post
    Looks like we have another long summer ahead of us
    Paint Jumper, don't know if this will help at all but if there are any particular places on the horses that they attack more than others I've found that plain ole swat helps.
    My worse problem is those teeny little flies that look like house flies and they attack the lower legs on my mare in particular. Oddly not the gelding. just the mare.
    I swat her lower legs down and it will keep them safe for a couple of days.
    If I don't keep the swat on them she will scratch her legs until they are bleeding.
    The fly sprays I have used and I think I've used them all don't do squat, only seem to irritate her lower legs.
    You might try putting it on her face, rub some inside and outside ears, rub in hair on dock.
    That seems to help here when the stinking no see 'em "bloom".
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.



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