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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2012
    Location
    knee deep in Oregon mud
    Posts
    648

    Default Only my horse...

    Would grow a tumor to get out of a job.

    My mare is booked to North Forks Cardi this season, a match up that I am really excited about and have been looking forward to for quite a while.

    We scanned my mare Monday for the first time this season to start tracking her, and wouldn't you know her left ovary was 9cm and cystic looking. Thinking OK, probably just a result of her transitional cycle, we gave Estrumate and planned to re-scan after she's had the chance to kick the CL. Re-scan happened today. No change.

    Presumptive diagnosis of granulosa-theca cell tumor at this point. Will be sending blood off to UC Davis on Monday for confirmation.

    I'm just really sad at this point. I've had so many plans with this mare derailed because of injuries (mine and then hers). Now if the test comes back positive, instead of breeding her and looking forward to a foal next spring I get to take my horse to Oregon State for surgery. The only upside to the whole situation is that one of Cardi's owners is a client of my SO. She's very sweet and I don't think I'll have trouble getting my stud fee back if I can't breed this season.
    It is only through labor and painful effort, by grim energy and resolute courage, that we move on to better things.
    Theodore Roosevelt



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 3, 2010
    Posts
    175

    Default

    I'm sorry. That sucks! Hopefully that's not what it is and you will be able to continue with your plans to breed to Cardi. What breed is your mare?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2012
    Location
    knee deep in Oregon mud
    Posts
    648

    Default

    She is a paint, but she has very high percentage of thoroughbred breeding (84%) and is much more sporthorse than stock horse. Even if it is what we think it is, most mares are fertile and able to be bred after the ovary with the tumor is removed.So I may still be able to breed her, but it would be next year or longer before I can even consider it. At least she's insured.
    It is only through labor and painful effort, by grim energy and resolute courage, that we move on to better things.
    Theodore Roosevelt



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2003
    Location
    Where is gets way too cold
    Posts
    3,161

    Default

    The recovery from a laparoscopic surgery should be fairly short, especially if the tumour isn't very big and the ovary can just be tied off and left in there. If you can get her cycling normally afterward you might be able to breed late this season?
    *CrowneDragon*
    As Peter, Paul, and Mary say, a dragon lives forever.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2012
    Location
    knee deep in Oregon mud
    Posts
    648

    Default

    It's about 10cm by 7 cm, so not huge, but definitely not small. The question is how hormonally active it is. We're sending blood out first thing tomorrow, so I should have an answer by the end of the week if we catch UC Davis's testing schedule.

    Usually it takes 6-8 months after the tumor is removed for normal cycling to occur, so we'd miss this season, but should be able to hit next season.
    It is only through labor and painful effort, by grim energy and resolute courage, that we move on to better things.
    Theodore Roosevelt



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