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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul. 16, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Equibrit View Post
    For what reason ?
    Does it make your horse perform any better ?
    Yes!! PM me and I'll give you a quote.


    27 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec. 23, 2010
    Location
    Lancashire UK, formerly Region 8
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    662

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    Sorry but I've personally always found those displays ostentatious and a bit comical. I'm much more impressed by a constant level of high-quality grooming and maintenance of tack and equipment. I would think that in dressage those display items might be better marketed to sponsors than trainers, but then some riders do seem to have more money than sense. To each their own of course, but I prefer to put my money into things that will benefit my horse. (says the Grumpy Old Dressage Woman).
    Last edited by Lost_at_C; Mar. 9, 2013 at 06:26 PM.
    Proud COTH lurker since 2001.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul. 16, 2012
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    210

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lost_at_C View Post
    I've personally always found those displays ostentatious and a bit comical. I'm much more impressed by a constant level of high-quality grooming and maintenance of tack and equipment. I would think that in dressage those display items might be better marketed to sponsors than trainers, but then some riders do seem to have more money than sense. To each their own of course, but I prefer to put my money into things that will benefit my horse. (says the Grumpy Old Dressage Woman).
    I don't think one has anything to do with the other. In the HJ world it's usually the trainer who wants the set-up so that clients have a nice place to sit between classes and a room to use for getting dressed, keeping a fridge with snacks, etc. If all the barns have them then it doesn't seem ostentatious but I can see how just one barn having it might look that way.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Posts
    1,064

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    It is nice to have a clean pleasant place to relax in between classes.

    Tack room curtains are great for privacy. Changing clothes. Getting out of your whites before getting slimed whilst putting your horse away.

    Popups help you to get out of the sun.

    A lot of this stuff is easy to install. And the benefits for all are significant.

    In our area, popups with Bronco's colors are very popular.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Posts
    2,091

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    Quote Originally Posted by HJStyleReport View Post
    I don't think one has anything to do with the other. In the HJ world it's usually the trainer who wants the set-up so that clients have a nice place to sit between classes and a room to use for getting dressed, keeping a fridge with snacks, etc. If all the barns have them then it doesn't seem ostentatious but I can see how just one barn having it might look that way.
    I think they are beautiful and they add a classy dimension that non horsey people can appreciate. When I was showing, my friend and I were very low budget, but some drapes with matching chairs, a nice ice cooler and fans, ta-da!!!! We were a popular stop at the local show. (dressage) Nothing wrong with beauty and comfort.
    "All top hat and no canter". *Graureiter*


    9 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2009
    Location
    Montreal, Qc
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    2,920

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    National Hunter/jumper shows here are 2 weeks long, if not more.
    National Dressage shows are held over 3-4 days max.

    So the set up stays there longer and is probably more usefull in the Hunter/jumper shows.

    I've done both dressage and jumper shows, and I like when people have nice set ups where you can relax and have fun with people. There is a few barns that have 'breakfast' in the morning where clients and good friends can grab a croissant and orange juice and a few others that organise 'wine n' cheese' at the end of the day on thursdays/fridays/saturdays.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun. 29, 2007
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    165

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    Show set up at dressage shows are much simpler than what you see at h/j shows. Even at the big shows the most you see is usually some drapes, a pop up and maybe a table with chairs. I think part of the reason people don't go all out is you tend not to hang around the show all day like you do at h/j shows. Dressage shows have set ride times and most riders have 2 class per day. There's very little sitting around and waiting.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    West
    Posts
    1,009

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    I have a decent set up that I will put up for hunter/jumper shows, but it is not elaborate and I have never gotten an extra stall to use as a changing room, as nobody ever wants to pay for that. I put up the curtains, the awning, and the matching tack trunks as well as some basic landscaping and flowers. Even if I had it, (which I don't) I can't imagine paying the extra help to get such fancy stuff hauled to the show and set up. It's a lot of work! I guess the big barns have enough paid help and customers willing to foot the bill to make it happen.

    I almost never do that for dressage shows, as we are just not at one show for long enough to warrant the set-up and all the work that goes with it. The most I've ever done is put up my awning and some chairs and a couple matching tack trunks.
    ******
    "A good horse and a good rider are only so in mutual trust."
    -H.M.E.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
    Location
    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
    Posts
    11,438

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    Well, as a recent convert from H/J land... I will say that I miss the nice set ups that we always had. It's nice to have a comfortable place to get changed, have some place to relax between rides, chat with friends, and let the DH hang out in some comfort during the show day. Plus, I do think that it presents a nice, professional appearance. Maybe it's just what I'm used to, but I've always enjoyed the social aspect of showing as part of the fun.. I don't find it ostentatious at all.
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina


    6 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    14,923

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    I'm with Lucassb-- Hunter Princess venturing into Dressage Land (not looking for a promotion to Dressage Queen).

    OP, I knew your company when it was very young in NorCal. Please do post pictures here so that the marginally open-minded can see and appreciate.

    DressageWorld will come around to the nice show barn look, sooner or later. That's because DressageWorld is becoming less DYI and more organized around a trainer and her business.

    IMO, you need to appeal to trainers. Folks do remember the barn with the very pretty and organized look. The tough part, as you know from HunterWorld, is getting the clients to pay for it all.

    I'd start with marketing either horse clothing or trunks to the trainer. Drapes and such involve a lot of labor and expense to do well and why get those right if the rest isn't matchy-match? But everyone needs whatever horse clothing they would have used anyway. And certainly trunks make sense.

    IMO, it would be smart for the barn to buy trunks to rent to clients rather than asking clients to buy $1K boxes is colors/art that someone else chose and don't have value to the client if she switches barns.

    I think you can market the idea of nice show equipment to the trainer. Clients will be more likely to follow. If the trainer had only, say, a trunk with her barn artwork, some chairs and a pop-up by the tack stall it would be enough to start making the barn stand out.

    I wish you success on your civilizing mission.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    6 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2001
    Posts
    8,832

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    I used to train with someone who went to work at a private dressage facility for a very wealthy client with fabulous horses and a huge show budget. They (the client) had previously competed in the saddleseat world and had a full "set up". Of course, they changed their colors for dressage so they bought new everything.

    To get to the show, they had a hauler bring the horses and used their trailer (6 horse, IIRC) to bring the set-up which included a tent w/windows, brown-jordan patio furniture (setees, chairs w/ ottomans, tables etc) multiple coolers filled with cold drinks and wine, plants, rugs etc. I think they had a person whose full time responsibility was to manage the space. It was their own beautiful, little world, lol. I'd always ask to stable near them because it was great to have a spot to get out of the sun and sip something. And everyone was truly welcome.

    That kind of set up is beyond most competitors. But it sure made for a friendly atmosphere at shows. I enjoyed it. I like the notion that we dressage competitors focus on our horses and their well being at shows. But set ups do help to develop an atmosphere that promotes relaxed camaraderie.

    OP, you might want to contact show managers and see if you could insert some promotional material in their premiums.

    Good luck
    See those flying monkeys? They work for me.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2011
    Location
    Maryland
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    2,061

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    Quote Originally Posted by Equibrit View Post
    So, it's pretty useless window dressing then. The only visual impression I would like a trainer to make, would be the way the horse goes.
    Wuh wuh...
    Barn rat for life

    The Big Horse


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
    Location
    Westchester County, NY
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    5,732

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    Shows are plenty social without $50,000 worth of custom crap, and the fees associated with moving it around, setting it up, etc. Also, most dressage shows don't last more than 4 days. We don't have circuits the way the H/J world does where horses are in the same show stalls for 3 weeks or more.

    The few trainers I've see at shows who go all-out with plants, full drapes, etc. generally have the reputation of being high dollar, no results sorts of places- no ribbons to hang up, but lots of pomp.

    We bring a folding table and chairs and my trainer's banner. We set out a food spread and drinks on the table, and in a cooler.

    As far as horse clothes, we do bring coolers for after baths, but horses don't stand around so we don't go crazy with show scrims, etc.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2001
    Location
    Purcellville, VA
    Posts
    5,925

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    Dressage shows also tend to be shorter. H/J shows where they do fancy set ups tend to run at least five days. It is comfortable to have a nice area to socialize when not riding.

    Someday I will get curtains for a tack stall and a few more things like saddle racks. It makes an away show more relaxing.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
    Posts
    8,527

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    Quote Originally Posted by Equibrit View Post
    For what reason ?
    Does it make your horse perform any better ?
    It lets everyone know that your trainer is very expensive.

    God forbid you socialize between classes without potted plants in $700 farm logo planters by your side. Who would ever socialize from a folding chair?
    Last edited by meupatdoes; Mar. 9, 2013 at 11:36 PM.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 1999
    Location
    South Coast Plaza
    Posts
    20,329

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    Quote Originally Posted by nhwr View Post
    I used to train with someone who went to work at a private dressage facility for a very wealthy client with fabulous horses and a huge show budget. They (the client) had previously competed in the saddleseat world and had a full "set up". Of course, they changed their colors for dressage so they bought new everything.

    To get to the show, they had a hauler bring the horses and used their trailer (6 horse, IIRC) to bring the set-up which included a tent w/windows, brown-jordan patio furniture (setees, chairs w/ ottomans, tables etc) multiple coolers filled with cold drinks and wine, plants, rugs etc. I think they had a person whose full time responsibility was to manage the space. It was their own beautiful, little world, lol. I'd always ask to stable near them because it was great to have a spot to get out of the sun and sip something. And everyone was truly welcome.

    That kind of set up is beyond most competitors. But it sure made for a friendly atmosphere at shows. I enjoyed it. I like the notion that we dressage competitors focus on our horses and their well being at shows. But set ups do help to develop an atmosphere that promotes relaxed camaraderie.

    OP, you might want to contact show managers and see if you could insert some promotional material in their premiums.

    Good luck
    Hat and cattle. I love that in a person

    Nhwr I can't remember who was supposed to call whom, but shall we lunch the week of the 18th? But not on the 20th.
    EDDIE WOULD GO



  17. #37
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    Nov. 1, 2001
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    8,832

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    My set up or yours?

    Pick a day, gf.
    See those flying monkeys? They work for me.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 2007
    Posts
    82

    Default QH Congress -- now these are crazy set ups

    I can't even imagine how long it takes to set these up.

    http://www.equinechronicle.com/nggal...-1/gallery-588


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2010
    Posts
    5,568

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    OK, I am a low budget, no nonsense do it for nothing dressage rider who's been around a long time in CA, and you guys are making me sound like Miss Mary Sunshine.

    Dressage people don't have the time or money H/J or others do for set ups, but they do it. Any 3-4 day show, or even 2 day show, has trainers come in who do some kind of set up, and certainly at the championships. It's not all of the hoity toity people. It tends to be the bigger people with a lot of clients, and most of them are very nice. All of the bigger trainers tend to do something to put up colors and have a nice seating area at the end of stalls where they can see what's going on. DG Bar, Hilda Gurney, Steffen Peters, Geunter Seidel, Leslie Morse and pretty much anyone with a big training barn who advertises does this.

    You're in the right area to find a business with people with the money who want to do this. It's not going to be on the level of the other disciplines, but there are certainly plenty of people who do set ups.

    (And, I only go to one day shows may have to pay for a stall once every few years at championships, will shove all of my stuff in front of my stalls, unless I can get someone to split a tack room to store stuff and take a nap in. )



  20. #40
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    May. 22, 2006
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    156

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    Quote Originally Posted by alibi_18 View Post
    National Hunter/jumper shows here are 2 weeks long, if not more.
    National Dressage shows are held over 3-4 days max.
    .
    I think this is the crux of the matter. It really just becomes a lot of work to haul things around and set up and take down for just a few days. Overall, I think workmanlike is the name of the game in dressage - professional, but not frilly. Look at how much buzz something like non-navy/black coats can make in the dressage world - personalized style is a pretty new concept . I don't know how stabling for h/j works (overall, I think weekly stabling works out to be a little cheaper?) but in dressage land a tack stall is the same cost as a horse stall and extra tack stalls beyond what is needed for actual tack are just not an expense many dressage people are interested in for a weekend show.

    That being said, I DO think there are some tack room/set up sort of things that would appeal to dressage trainers/clients. Things that look good and make their life easier/convenient (rather than looking prettier). The large wheeling tack trunks are popular so there is less set up and everything in the same place show after show, blanket racks/bags (personalized with farm logo) in climates where horses often need sheets/blankets, drying racks for all the sweat/muddy things that come back from the arena, good ways to hold/organize bridles, saddles (we always did saddle stands until we realized there was such a thing as a portable vertical saddle rack (duh! we just hadn't thought of it because you never see it at dressage shows!), a way to organize large numbers of saddle pads and white polos for the bigger barns. There is a lot of set up stuff dressage people may not know about but may be interested in using, and a market there relatively untapped. But I think it's going to be an uphill battle getting dressage people to bring potted plants or get an extra stall for 'hanging out'.


    1 members found this post helpful.

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