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  1. #1
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    Default Canon Rebel T3 vs T3i for equine photography?

    Getting ready to upgrade (finally) from my point and shoot Coolpix and have decided on a Canon because of all the positive info I've received so far. Anyone familiar with these two models? They both come with two lenses but there's a 200.00 $ difference.



  2. #2
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    I have a T3i, the factory short lens, plus a 300mm lens.

    I don't shoot horses, so not sure what I can tell you, but here it goes:

    The camera is fantastic, I love it.
    The battery life is great, it has an auto off feature that can safe your butt on occasion. the buttons are easy to find and I think I got most of the features down.

    what I don't like:
    the camera gets really slow in low light. Not as bad as my Olympus did, but it's there.
    when I use the little screen instead f the view finder, shutter lag is substantial.

    the focus zone is somewhere around 10 spots over most of the picture area. Depending on what you are aiming at, it makes you want to rip your hair out! You can switch to Manual focus though...but the switch is on the lens, and there is really no visual aid telling you when you are there.
    Back in the day of MF, I got pretty good at guessing the distance, but 30 years later, I am just not there anymore.

    The 300mm lens (Canon) is pretty good, but quiet heavy, so when you are in low light, you MUST stabelize your camera! Or you get fuzzies.

    But you should be pleased with it for outdoor shows.


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  3. #3
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    Oct. 30, 2006
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    The T3i should be fine for most photography needs on an entry level pro basis. I use a Canon T2i and it's "okay"...I'm ready for a step up to a bigger camera. You can see examples of my work with the T2i at http://www.imaginedreality.net

    Of more importance than the body will be your lenses. Get the best lenses you can possibly get. For equine photography, the be-all-end-all lens is the Canon 70-200 f2.8. I don't have this lens yet - my photos are primarily shot with the 55-250 f4-5.6, and while it does fine in good light, in low light, it's not a great lens.
    Last edited by Unbound; Mar. 9, 2013 at 05:14 PM.


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  4. #4
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    Mar. 6, 2006
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    http://snapsort.com/compare/Canon-T3-vs-Canon-T3i Read this Love the Snapsort comparisons - helped me a lot with my quest for my first DSLR. If you do go with the T3i check Costco for the kit, it's a good deal for the kit, and you get the 2 year concierege service and a generous return policy.

    You're going to want to go with something other then the standard kit lens though like others have said above.

    I wound up with a Nikon D7000 myself becuase we found a good deal, but otherwise was strongly considering a T3i

    Good deals can be had on Ebay for lenses.



  5. #5
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    Default

    Thanks guys. Unbound, your photos are fantastic! Looks like that T2i is discontinued but was succeeded by the T3i? I need something that is good for low light... which would you recommend? This is the second time I've heard the camera is not ideal in low light situations.



  6. #6
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    Auto modes are often bad in low light, you can sometimes compensate for the low light in manual modes though. Hopefully someone else can chime in on this that knows more, I haven't figured out how to set mine up quite correctly yet!



  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by springer View Post
    Thanks guys. Unbound, your photos are fantastic! Looks like that T2i is discontinued but was succeeded by the T3i? I need something that is good for low light... which would you recommend? This is the second time I've heard the camera is not ideal in low light situations.
    the better lens.
    sunrise
    http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n...ps4283146a.jpg

    at a concert
    http://s62.beta.photobucket.com/user...ml?sort=3&o=52
    http://s62.beta.photobucket.com/user...ml?sort=3&o=68
    http://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h9...-9-2012508.jpg

    certainly, more light, less movement makes better pictures with the regular f-stop lens. also, you have to have a sturdy tripod, monopod. Saying that since I never really use either, moving cameras around, swapping (I have two...)



  8. #8
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    Feb. 4, 2001
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    Sheridan, IN
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    Here are some photos I took with the Rebel T3i & the 70-300 lens at Burghley in 2011

    https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...1567647&type=3

    Here are some photos I've taken with the camera I replaced it with, the Canon 7D, mostly with the 700-200 2.8 L series lens. I use this lens more than any of my others.
    https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...1&l=1b126c7101
    Last edited by LAZ; Mar. 10, 2013 at 07:57 PM.


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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by LAZ View Post
    Here are some photos I took with the Rebel T3i & the 70-300 lens at Burghley in 2011

    https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...1567647&type=3

    Here are some photos I've taken with the camera I replaced it with, the Canon 7D, mostly with the 700-200 2.8 L series lens. I use this lens more than any of my others.
    https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...1&l=1b126c7101
    Some really nice shots!



  10. #10
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    Oct. 30, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by springer View Post
    Thanks guys. Unbound, your photos are fantastic! Looks like that T2i is discontinued but was succeeded by the T3i? I need something that is good for low light... which would you recommend? This is the second time I've heard the camera is not ideal in low light situations.
    Thank you, Springer!

    Low light, you will want good glass. Look for lenses with f-stop numbers that are 1.2-2.8, to let in more light. They are more $$, but are worth it.

    You'll get some noise if shooting in low light with the T3i, but if you get Lightroom, you can get rid of a lot of that noise in post-processing.

    Indoor arenas are TOUGH, regardless of if you have good glass or not. The lighting is often horrid, and it's dusty, which adds to the problems.

    I think the next step up to really compensate for noise would be the 5DMKII, but those are $$$$, and really only needed if you want to go completely pro, or have a lot of $$ burning a hole in your pocket.

    You can rent lenses (and camera bodies) at www.borrowlenses.com if you're interested in trying out a few before you buy. :-)

    Good luck & feel free to ping me if you have any questions! I'm still learning myself, but always happy to help if I can!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
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    Feb. 4, 2001
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    I bought Lightroom, but I've yet to figure out how to use it! Did you take a class or just keep plugging away til it was useful?



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by LAZ View Post
    I bought Lightroom, but I've yet to figure out how to use it! Did you take a class or just keep plugging away til it was useful?
    I just kept plugging away at it. I need to take a class - I'm sure it will do more than I know how to do with it!



  13. #13
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    So what did ya buy?
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have, at this moment, been thrown up from below!



  14. #14
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    In all honesty -- the camera does not matter that much, especially if you are in the same category of models. What matters is the eye behind it and the quality of glass in front of it. I highly recommend buying a body, then buying the nicest glass you can afford to put on it. I got some nice shots with generic kit lenses, but will never go back after receiving a much better quality Canon 28-80mm as a gift. Of course, an educated and talented eye can give you a mind-blowing shot from a handheld point and shoot, so keep learning!



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    I have a T3i, the factory short lens, plus a 300mm lens.

    I don't shoot horses, so not sure what I can tell you, but here it goes:

    The camera is fantastic, I love it.
    The battery life is great, it has an auto off feature that can safe your butt on occasion. the buttons are easy to find and I think I got most of the features down.

    what I don't like:
    the camera gets really slow in low light. Not as bad as my Olympus did, but it's there.
    when I use the little screen instead f the view finder, shutter lag is substantial.

    the focus zone is somewhere around 10 spots over most of the picture area. Depending on what you are aiming at, it makes you want to rip your hair out! You can switch to Manual focus though...but the switch is on the lens, and there is really no visual aid telling you when you are there.
    Back in the day of MF, I got pretty good at guessing the distance, but 30 years later, I am just not there anymore.

    The 300mm lens (Canon) is pretty good, but quiet heavy, so when you are in low light, you MUST stabelize your camera! Or you get fuzzies.

    But you should be pleased with it for outdoor shows.
    I think any time you are using a screen instead of a viewfinder in low light things will be slow. And you'll be annoying anyone behind you who is blinded by your screen...

    You can also set to use specific focal points - learn those settings, because the multiple point auto focus is a pain in the rear. I let my camera autofocus on whatever I want to have be the focal point, change it to manual focus, then compose my shot. I take a ton of concert photos, and switch behind that method and just center focus for them, depending how much the musicians are moving around.

    Anyway, the T1i is great in low light if you're using the correct lens and settings.

    Quote Originally Posted by wildlifer View Post
    In all honesty -- the camera does not matter that much, especially if you are in the same category of models. What matters is the eye behind it and the quality of glass in front of it. I highly recommend buying a body, then buying the nicest glass you can afford to put on it. I got some nice shots with generic kit lenses, but will never go back after receiving a much better quality Canon 28-80mm as a gift. Of course, an educated and talented eye can give you a mind-blowing shot from a handheld point and shoot, so keep learning!
    Yep. I don't know anything about T1 and what's different, but the T1i is great for me!

    Our barn is fairly dark, but it works quite well in there:
    http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphoto...61015183_n.jpg

    Depth of field is much less in dark situations, and that's one of the things you have to get used to. Once you do, you can use it to your advantage:
    http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphoto..._3060357_n.jpg

    This gives you an idea of what it can do in VERY low lighting. Notice he's backlit - I think it's the light from the bar area making his face visible. The venue has since added lights in front of the stage, accompanied by sighs of relief from many photographers. http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphoto..._7307632_n.jpg
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed


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  16. #16
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    nice shots!

    I had some good success at concerts, although I have to say I should throw most out. But hey, You got a guitarist really rock out, he's a blur of light to the naked eye....

    I only use the little screen now when I can't frame the shot otherwise...like crouching around in the yard or the stands.



  17. #17
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    Canon is having a massive refurb sale in case anyone is pondering some purchases. Lenses, flashes, and cameras. I just picked up a few lenses and lens accessories for myself at around 50% normal cost. They also have the new pinch lens caps in stock and those are definitely worth buying if you have a compatible lens.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have, at this moment, been thrown up from below!



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by LAZ View Post
    I bought Lightroom, but I've yet to figure out how to use it! Did you take a class or just keep plugging away til it was useful?
    I took a few photography classes from the Denver Botanic Garden photographer and he used LR (but the class was not on LR). Come to think of it, he did teach a class on the digital workflow and showed how he used LR.

    A book I found useful is the Adobe Photoshop Lightroom4 book for digital photography by Scott Kelby. Having said that, troll the internet for videos on using it. Very useful for cataloging your photos as well as post processing. The post processing that LR offers is not near as robust as PS but I rarely need the PS level of post processing. Also, take raw photos. You have more latitude with post processing with raw and using LR, you don't edit the original raw photo... all edits are saved in what is called a sidecar file.



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