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  1. #81
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    Aug. 4, 2009
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    She did nt look lame and I see a lot of horse off track ....so where is our update..purple you speak my language and BFNE you know we are on same wave length....


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  2. #82
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    Sep. 13, 2002
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    Azle, Teh-has
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    Quote Originally Posted by alto View Post
    Not exactly - go back & LOOK at the Oct photo - the mare was beyond "skinny"

    Yes I remember this horse & in the spirit of boldly stating my opinion, he was always lame, off, unsound or whatever euphemism you may wish to use ... unsure why it took so long to investigate when it's so simple ...
    1st. I didn't see the Oct photos. All I found on this thread were videos.

    2nd.
    Don't bust what you do not know. The horse had a sore back at one point. And at that time I did take care of it. The thread concerning his sore back STATES all of the vetting work we did and how well he was afterwards.
    He also took "over all grand champ" that year for schooling shows and was usually a rail ahead of the competition after dressage. (But maybe I'm just awesome at getting the very best out of a lame horse??)
    Thank you very much.

    Also, last year's lameness was on and off for 4 months and we investigated it for the ENTIRE 4 months before and MRI finally gave the real answers.
    So, BITE ME!


    now COTHers, back to your scheduled program...
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!


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  3. #83
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    Jun. 30, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by purplnurpl View Post
    1st. I didn't see the Oct photos. All I found on this thread were videos.

    2nd.
    Don't bust what you do not know. The horse had a sore back at one point. And at that time I did take care of it. The thread concerning his sore back STATES all of the vetting work we did and how well he was afterwards.
    He also took "over all grand champ" that year for schooling shows and was usually a rail ahead of the competition after dressage. (But maybe I'm just awesome at getting the very best out of a lame horse??)
    Thank you very much.

    Also, last year's lameness was on and off for 4 months and we investigated it for the ENTIRE 4 months before and MRI finally gave the real answers.
    So, BITE ME!


    now COTHers, back to your scheduled program...
    I though I did already

    & he IS an awesome horse & yes I do recall the sore back etc, but he was also always subtlety off: you made the decisions that worked for you personally & the OP in this instance is also doing that.


    Don't bust what you do not know.
    Is that not what you did in regards to the horse (& people) in this epilog?

    I thought I had made that point clear ...
    but perhaps not ...



  4. #84
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    Jan. 9, 2013
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    She flexed positive in both distal limbs, so we started with front x-rays. She has moderate pedal osteitis in both front feet. We stopped at that point and did not move on to hinds, but vet suspects same story there. So sad. She is perfect otherwise. I really wanted to give this mare a second career and a loving forever home. Is horse shopping normally filled with so much disappointment? I feel like this is getting ridiculous.



  5. #85
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    Jan. 9, 2013
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    Also, from my preliminary research on pedal osteitis and the anecdotal respones from this forum, it seems like I should pass on her, right?

    My heart says to keep her, but my head says to find a sound horse. The vet said she's a huge risk, especially since she's not in work yet. Of course, there are stories of horses with this condition doing fine for many years (with proper maintenance, supps, special shoeing, etc.), but that's the outlier nor the norm.

    Thoughts?



  6. #86
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2005
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    PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by blame_the_champagne View Post
    She flexed positive in both distal limbs, so we started with front x-rays. She has moderate pedal osteitis in both front feet. We stopped at that point and did not move on to hinds, but vet suspects same story there. So sad. She is perfect otherwise. I really wanted to give this mare a second career and a loving forever home. Is horse shopping normally filled with so much disappointment? I feel like this is getting ridiculous.
    Not really...but you can find it. Horse ownership can be filled with it too. I just spent more than your budget on a yearling that ended up in the hospital for a week because he ran into something playing in the field. He will be fine, but cost me more to fix than I've paid to purchase some of my horses. That's horses for you.

    I've known several horses who bounced back from pedal osteitis---xray findings...but it took time and care and isn't something that I would personally buy knowingly. Sounds like she may not be for you given your goals, but she may be perfectly suited for someone else.

    ETA: In your situation, I'd keep looking. But you wouldn't be nuts to take her on either. I wouldn't pay for her if you take her on though and she is a risk as a performance horse. I don't think it is the outlyer that a horse with moderate pedal osteitis will be able to do something. They just will need shoes etc. and it is not certain that they will hold up to eventing...especially if you are not sure of the cause. I had one who I had owned as a yearling and found the pedal osteitis as a 4 year old. Not sure of the exact cause as he was well cared for from the time I owned him. It took forever for us to sort out what was wrong and his xrays were not terrible. It took putting him in glue ones with a plate for 6 months to get the inflammation out of his foot...then another year of glue on shoes and VERY careful management of his turn out. It took 2 years total to bring him totally around but he ended up doing training level.
    Last edited by bornfreenowexpensive; Mar. 12, 2013 at 05:30 PM.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  7. #87
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    Jun. 3, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by blame_the_champagne View Post
    She flexed positive in both distal limbs, so we started with front x-rays. She has moderate pedal osteitis in both front feet. We stopped at that point and did not move on to hinds, but vet suspects same story there. So sad. She is perfect otherwise. I really wanted to give this mare a second career and a loving forever home. Is horse shopping normally filled with so much disappointment? I feel like this is getting ridiculous.
    Sad! I would pass. There are many sound horses out there...why start with an un-sound one?


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  8. #88
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    Jan. 27, 2003
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    Pass on this one. She could very well lead to more heartbreak down the road.



  9. #89
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    Oct. 14, 2010
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    Taking on any risky horse really depends on the buyers situation and resources. If you have acreage to spare, stalls available and other horses - adding a new one that may or may not work out may not be such big a deal.

    If this is your only horse and you have to board etc - and only one horse is in your budget/resources, then taking a risky horse can be very limiting and full of anguish.

    Trying your best for a brave mare is a great start to the typically tough world of horse shopping. Who knows what the future may hold. Best wishes.



  10. #90
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    Jul. 25, 2003
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    Boston Area
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    Oh, that's too bad. She is a lovely mover. In your shoes, I'd pass because of the uncertainty as to whether she could event.

    Looking for a horse is frustrating for sure. I can remember when two in a row showed problems during the PPE that I didn't want to live with. My husband joked that pretty soon it would be a moot point because I wouldn't have any money left to buy a horse.

    The next horse I vetted was very clean and he was sound for the next 12 years.

    Your horse is out there.

    ETA - I suppose the only wild card here is how well you know the vet and how well that vet understands your needs. I have had vets tell me that a horse was a risky choice for my goals and I have passed on those horses . . . but I knew my vet very well and trusted his judgment. Any time when I vetted a horse out of state, I always asked my "home town" vet to review the findings as well.
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
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  11. #91
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    Aug. 25, 2005
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    Northeast
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    Here is an interesting article published by a highly respected veterinarian who deals with the equine foot.

    Dr Moyer is a man for whose opinions I have the highest respect.
    http://www.equipodiatry.com/moyer.htm
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.


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  12. #92
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    Oct. 17, 2007
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    CO
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    I, too, would pass. It's always best to start with a sound horse...so much can go wrong, even with the sound ones. Bummer, because she is cute!

    Do you have a trainer or trusted friend who can help you look? Sometimes word of mouth and friendships can be the best way to find the right horse.



  13. #93
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    Jul. 18, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by blame_the_champagne View Post
    She flexed positive in both distal limbs, so we started with front x-rays. She has moderate pedal osteitis in both front feet. We stopped at that point and did not move on to hinds, but vet suspects same story there. So sad. She is perfect otherwise. I really wanted to give this mare a second career and a loving forever home. Is horse shopping normally filled with so much disappointment? I feel like this is getting ridiculous.
    You have only considered 2 prospects at this point, so trust me when I say that you are a LONG way from "ridiculous" yet! But I certainly know how disappointing that is when you are on a tight budget, so you have my sincere sympathies. In your place, and assuming your budget is blown at this point, I would choose to continue the free lease for a few months, ride/train her like a normal horse, and just see how she does. This approach also assumes that the horse is currently comfortable at walk, trot, and canter and only painful on hoof testers. If I have interpreted the earlier posts correctly, you have a radiographic diagnosis of pedal osteitis but the horse herself is moving sound. If the horse is obviously sore in front on firm ground despite being shod, I would stop now and continue the search.

    Best of luck to you!



  14. #94
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    Jan. 3, 2013
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    Horse shopping can be expensive and difficult. I would keep looking you'll be suprised the right horse will come along. When I started looking I took a 4 year old appy on a 30 day trial. After two weeks I had the vet out and in the beginning of her ppe she was diagnosed with heaves. She went back (and the heaves cleared up it was the air quality of where I live). Then I got a very young awesome mover, crazy athletic mare that was not truly broke (was sold as broke). I can ride green horses but she had an amazing bronco buck in her and tossed me a few times. I stuck with her for awhile but ultimately decided I would have a hard time trusting her in the future with new challenges so I ended up having to give her away. Then I was tired of it all and settled on a cheap horse that would be fine for local shows/trails but was nothing special and then at the barn where my friend's horse was being trained we were talking about that third horse I was about to buy. The trainer overheard and said he had a horse to show me but I declined since I had already decided to buy the third horse. A few days later it was still bugging me so I setup a time to try him. He is literally the perfect fit for me. Before horse shopping I made up a list of my must haves, wishes I could have and my goals. I went so far as to list the order of my color preference even though I was not making a decision based on color. The horse I ended up with no joke was everything that I listed I wished I could have, age, experience, training, mind, color etc and I could afford him! I didn't think he existed it was just what my dream horse would be. So please don't get your hopes down keep looking you will find your perfect horse.



  15. #95
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    Mar. 6, 2002
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    Oregon
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    Quote Originally Posted by blame_the_champagne View Post
    Also, from my preliminary research on pedal osteitis and the anecdotal respones from this forum, it seems like I should pass on her, right?

    My heart says to keep her, but my head says to find a sound horse. The vet said she's a huge risk, especially since she's not in work yet. Of course, there are stories of horses with this condition doing fine for many years (with proper maintenance, supps, special shoeing, etc.), but that's the outlier nor the norm.

    Thoughts?
    The only time I would take a risk like that is if I could afford to have a pasture pet.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what
    lies with in us. - Emerson


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  16. #96
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    Aug. 30, 2011
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    Massachusetts
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    Quote Originally Posted by blame_the_champagne View Post
    Also, from my preliminary research on pedal osteitis and the anecdotal respones from this forum, it seems like I should pass on her, right?

    My heart says to keep her, but my head says to find a sound horse. The vet said she's a huge risk, especially since she's not in work yet. Of course, there are stories of horses with this condition doing fine for many years (with proper maintenance, supps, special shoeing, etc.), but that's the outlier nor the norm.

    Thoughts?
    Aw that's too bad I know you really like her and she is fancy.

    I would pass on her if, like other people have said, you can't afford to have a pasture pet, or if you want something able to go soonish. It sounds like she's going to need some time to get the foot issues straightened out, if they can be straightened out. Its a bummer.


    I already posted my experience with my chronically foot sore horse, (who had clean xrays btw, the best shoeing etc) so I won't say it again. But it was heartbreaking and very expensive.

    Regarding horse shopping, I shop with a similar budget to yours so I do understand the challenges I've found what works best for myself is to go look at horses who are actively racing, or who recently ran. If I can see then go a bit (even just walk/trot straight line in hand) with in a few days of their last race, I can have a good idea if they are sound enough to be worth going on to the next step.

    Good luck with what ever you decide!!!! Horses are awesome, but frustrating!!!


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  17. #97
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    Jan. 19, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by visorvet View Post
    You have only considered 2 prospects at this point, so trust me when I say that you are a LONG way from "ridiculous" yet! But I certainly know how disappointing that is when you are on a tight budget, so you have my sincere sympathies. In your place, and assuming your budget is blown at this point, I would choose to continue the free lease for a few months, ride/train her like a normal horse, and just see how she does. This approach also assumes that the horse is currently comfortable at walk, trot, and canter and only painful on hoof testers. If I have interpreted the earlier posts correctly, you have a radiographic diagnosis of pedal osteitis but the horse herself is moving sound. If the horse is obviously sore in front on firm ground despite being shod, I would stop now and continue the search.

    Best of luck to you!

    This is very good advice. And from your perspective, you can help this mare out as well. If it turns out she will not hold up as an eventer or jumping prospect....you will have put a bit of training into her that will help her transition more easily into a home that she is most suited. Sounds win win to me.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **


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  18. #98
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    Aug. 25, 2005
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    Northeast
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    Quote Originally Posted by visorvet View Post
    You have only considered 2 prospects at this point, so trust me when I say that you are a LONG way from "ridiculous" yet! But I certainly know how disappointing that is when you are on a tight budget, so you have my sincere sympathies. In your place, and assuming your budget is blown at this point, I would choose to continue the free lease for a few months, ride/train her like a normal horse, and just see how she does. This approach also assumes that the horse is currently comfortable at walk, trot, and canter and only painful on hoof testers. If I have interpreted the earlier posts correctly, you have a radiographic diagnosis of pedal osteitis but the horse herself is moving sound. If the horse is obviously sore in front on firm ground despite being shod, I would stop now and continue the search.

    Best of luck to you!
    Here I agree! Continue your search, but see where she goes. I would at this point discontinue the anti inflammatory drugs. You want to know where she really is.

    I've only had one horse that could event barefoot but she wasn't all that interested. Competent but not enthusiastic.

    Everyone else needed shoes.

    She may end up at a dressage home.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.


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  19. #99
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    Feb. 22, 2009
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    Wisconsin
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    I would pass. Those are way to many red flags at least for me. Where in CA are you? Would you be willing to travel to BC?


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  20. #100
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    Dec. 7, 2009
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    Maryland
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    So sorry, but please pass on her and star with a sound horse. It will be easier if you just don't look at anything lame. This mare needs lots time off to even figure out where she's going to be. Just walk away from lane horses. Don't lease them, X-ray them, or try to make it work. Ask me how I know.

    There are many wonderful sound horses out there. I know it's frustrating, but starting with a lame horse is never the best answer



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