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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2007
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    Montana
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    Renn do video it, all of it, room-mate has to see what is going on so he totally understands.

    The only way I've been able to get away from mine is to put her in a car. In the yard or anywhere else she just gets louder. I tried rescue remedy on her and it didn't work on her but maybe you would have better luck than I did.

    I hope you're able to find a solution; it's an incredibly frustrating situation and I don't think you deserve any snark for it! If you find a solution for heaven's sake let me know! I'm listening to mine pace and whine as I type... we leave to take the kids to school in 15 minutes and she's already freaking out.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2002
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    Chesterton, IN US
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    You might try rescue remedy or a thunder shirt. You said she settles down after 1/2 hour. You could try rewarding her the second she settles. My shepherd whined in the car incessently. I had already clicker trained him so I the instant he stopped whining to take a breath, I clicked and treated. It took 5 minutes for him to figure it out.

    Alternatively, you could just invest in some nice ear plugs or head phones (for you).



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2001
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    I really wouldn't try an aversive for this situation. The dog is expressing mild separation anxiety- yes, I know it's driving you crazy, but on the scale of how bad separation anxiety can get, this is mild- and using aversives won't work. You might be able to suppress the whining by shocking the dog, but the dog's inner emotional state won't change and the distress will have to be expressed in some other, perhaps even more annoying, way, like ripping the house to pieces, or peeing all over the place or aggression or perhaps even having a total mental melt-down. The thundershirts and trying DAP or other calming chemicals are good ideas. The dog may need medication from the vet to help during the initial stages.

    this is a pretty good overview of the general approach:
    How to treat minor separation anxiety
    Don't make a big deal out of arrivals and departures. For example, when you arrive home, ignore your dog for the first few minutes then calmly pet him.
    Leave your dog with an article of clothing that smells like you, such as an old T-shirt that you've slept in recently.
    Establish a safety cue—a word or action that you use every time you leave that tells your dog you'll be back.
    Consider using an over-the-counter calming product that may reduce fearfulness in dogs.

    How to handle a more severe problem

    Use the techniques outlined above along with desensitization training. Teach your dog the sit-stay and down-stay commands using positive reinforcement. This training will help him learn that he can remain calmly and happily in one place while you go to another room.

    Create a "safe place" to limit your dog's ability to be destructive. A safe place should:
    Confine loosely rather than strictly (a room with a window and distractions rather than total isolation)
    Contain busy toys for distraction
    Have dirty laundry to lend a calming olfactory cue or other safety cues.

    What to do in the meantime

    It can take time for your dog to unlearn his panic response to your departures. To help you and your dog cope in the short term, consider the following interim solutions:
    Ask your veterinarian about drug therapy. A good anti-anxiety drug shouldn't sedate your dog but simply reduce his overall anxiety.
    Take your dog to a doggie day care facility or kennel when you have to be away.
    Leave your dog with a friend, family member, or neighbor when you're away.
    Take your dog to work with you, if possible.

    What won't help
    Punishment. Punishment isn't effective for treating separation anxiety and can make the situation worse. The destruction and house soiling that often occur with separation anxiety aren't your dog's revenge for being left alone: they're part of a panic response.
    Another dog. Getting your dog a companion usually doesn't help an anxious dog because his anxiety is the result of his separation from you, not just the result of being alone.
    Crating. Your dog will still engage in anxiety responses inside a crate, and he may urinate, defecate, howl, or even injure himself in an attempt to escape. Instead, create other kinds of "safe places" as described above.
    Radio/TV noise. Leaving the radio or television on won't help (unless the radio or TV is used as a safety cue).
    Obedience training. While formal training is always a good idea, separation anxiety isn't the result of disobedience or lack of training; therefore, it won't help this particular issue.
    Last edited by wendy; Mar. 8, 2013 at 03:13 PM.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2008
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    4,538

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    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post

    Teach your dog the sit-stay and down-stay commands using positive reinforcement. This training will help him learn that he can remain calmly and happily in one place while you go to another room.
    all of this is great, but...

    1. not the OP's dog

    2. the OP firmly stated s/he does not want to train the dog.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2002
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    I had a neighbor who had good luck using a DAP collar to quiet her dog when she left. She would bark incessantly for at least an hour.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2001
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    1. not the OP's dog

    2. the OP firmly stated s/he does not want to train the dog.
    yes, most of those suggestions are going to have to be passed on to the dog's owner.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
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    Mass.
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulaedwina View Post
    That's why you have to stuff the kong with something extraordinarily smelly and good so you increase it's value. This isn't the time for health or wisdom -heck if you could stuff a kong with week-old squirrel that would be the way to go.

    Paula
    Paula, I just love you. You are so PRACTICAL!
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



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