The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 21, 2013
    Posts
    85

    Question Buying a horse with thumps?

    So...I have been leasing an amazing seven year old Hanoverian gelding to do the 3ft and 3'6 equitation on, with a lease to buy option. We have only been leasing him for a few months, and honestly, he is perfect. Buying him would be a better deal than leasing him. But, a few days ago, he just stopped eating his food, wouldn't drink, and once in a while he would have some hiccups. He was a bit lethargic, but other than that, he was fine. We had the vet come over, who confirmed that he had thumps (hiccups), which was most likely caused by an electrolyte deficiency. We've put him on an electrolyte supplement these past few days, and he seems to be doing much better. The vet said that it most likely wouldn't be a problem. But him having thumps has made me reconsider whether to buy him or not. I would use him for the rest of my junior career, and then I would lease him out - but would anyone lease a horse with thumps? I don't know. So, what do you guys think about this whole thing? Do you guys think that it would still be wise to buy him?

    Thank you!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2012
    Posts
    92

    Default

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't thumps specifically linked to dehydration/electrolyte deficiency and is not an on-going or genetic condition?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2011
    Location
    Co
    Posts
    5,321

    Default

    Oh, dear, the "thumps"!

    Listen to your vet.. and if you don't trust your vet, get a second opinion.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2009
    Posts
    1,184

    Default

    I have been around the block a couple times in terms of equine veterinary care and conditions on my accident and "condition" prone horses, but I honestly have never heard of "thumps" or a horse having the hiccups before! Is this definitely a real condition?

    If all you have to do is feed him electrolytes and then he is good to go, I would not worry at all about future leasing possibilities. Seems like a minimal inconvenience for a perfect horse!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    6,028

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by klmck63 View Post
    I have been around the block a couple times in terms of equine veterinary care and conditions on my accident and "condition" prone horses, but I honestly have never heard of "thumps" or a horse having the hiccups before! Is this definitely a real condition?

    If all you have to do is feed him electrolytes and then he is good to go, I would not worry at all about future leasing possibilities. Seems like a minimal inconvenience for a perfect horse!
    Yes it is real, and I think often caused by electrolyte imbalance but isn't it also caused by a calcium deficiency? I have never had a horse with this issue but know someone who did and I thought it required some tweaking of the diet because it was calcium related? Horse in question is now doing fine, so I also think it is not usually an ongoing condition.

    You could move this to Horse Care for more responses, or search hiccups or thumps because I think there was recently another thread.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2013
    Posts
    166

    Default

    Wouldn't stop me if it could be managed easily.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2012
    Location
    The Part of TN in the Wrong Time Zone
    Posts
    2,217

    Default

    It sounds like it's managed easily with supplements so yes I would still buy or lease him.
    .אני יכול לעשות הכל על ידי אלוהים



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2011
    Location
    Southern WI
    Posts
    311

    Default

    Thumps has to do with a horse using up too much of the electrolytes in its body, including but not limited to K+, Ca2, Na+, etc. It happens more frequently with unfit horses or horses that sweat a lot. I would be more concerned with why the horse was not eating or drinking. Side note: until the horse gets some fluids into their system, never give electrolytes because it will dehydrate them even more.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2013
    Posts
    146

    Default

    I had this same problem. We discovered it over a year go. Afterwards I put my horse on an electrolyte supplement daily and over time weaned her off. Now she only gets electrolytes once a week with a soaked bran mash - or more if we are showing in the heat.

    I would consult your vet for a supplement plan that works best for you horse, but it is defiantly manageable. And an inexpensive problem to have.

    By the time you were to lease the horse out, you will have found a program that works for your horse. It should be easy for the leaser to continue it.


    2 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. Two thumps up for Absorbine!
    By Haf N Haf in forum Off Course
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Oct. 27, 2011, 12:05 PM
  2. Thumps
    By pixie in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: May. 12, 2011, 09:16 AM
  3. Thumps
    By JstMyLuck3 in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: Oct. 20, 2009, 08:09 PM
  4. What in the world are "The Thumps?"
    By Philliab in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: Jun. 24, 2009, 01:43 PM
  5. Buying a new horse
    By Asmac in forum Dressage
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: May. 19, 2008, 11:17 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •