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  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4cornersfarm View Post
    Yes, please. I'd like to know where this magical land is!!
    So far, it's closest to Oklahoma City (if you can stand the wind). Dang, that would make land undesirable for me, too.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoSuchPerson View Post
    Check out the CNN/Money magazine Best Places to Live list.

    http://money.cnn.com/magazines/money...s/2012/top100/

    You can't directly get at whether or not the type of land you're interested in is available, but it gives you a nice list to start with.
    That's what I'm talkin' about! We need that plus COTH input on Horse-centric factors.

    IME on both coasts near big cities and in the sticks, when you step down in the price of land and boarding cost, you also lose depth of knowledge in trainers. I mean this mainly for trainers in English World and for people who want to show. There may be fabulous horsemen around anywhere. The other biggie is the loss of really expert farriers. You usually can haul to find a lameness vet guru or a university clinic. But man, working around the Farrier Desert, is a big drawback to living somewhere cheap.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    LadyNeon...not to be nosy but could you say what careers, other than forecaster, can be done with a meteorology degree? Understood if you don't want to say what you do, was just wondering. I always assumed meteorology automatically meant weatherperson of some sort.
    I know a meteorologist who works for an environmental consulting firm. He does air modeling (e.g. modeling where emissions from a smokestack will end up going and what concentrations of different chemicals will be present).


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  4. #84
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    Go with your gut, do some more research - shadow jobs for a day you think you may be interested in and ask lots of questions! I find what also makes a good working situation is a boss that values work/life balance - when it's winter and you want to catch the last few minutes of sun to ride in they won't give you crap. Also, I don't think it's been brought up but jobs with good benefits I've fallen off one too many times and appreciate the coverage when I am visiting Urgent Care



  5. #85
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    I need to bring up Air Traffice Controller once again; median annual wage of air traffic controllers was $108,040 in May 2010; those with 20 years of experience are eligible to retire at age 50. In addition, controllers are required to retire at age 56

    so there is pleanty of time to play with the horseys

    27,000 opening currently


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoSuchPerson View Post
    I know a meteorologist who works for an environmental consulting firm. He does air modeling (e.g. modeling where emissions from a smokestack will end up going and what concentrations of different chemicals will be present).
    Not an easy job to find, perhaps, but meteorologists also work in financial firms supporting commodity traders. Agricultural commodities (i.e. cotton, wheat, corn futures, etc) and heating/cooling related commodities are heavily impacted by weather. It's definitely a good job if you can find it - and if you're willing to work long hours.
    Born under a rock and owned by beasts!



  7. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by suzier444 View Post
    If I had it all to do all over again, I'd also look for a) careers with jobs available in suburban or country locations, so it doesn't take you an hour and a half to get to the barn every time you want to ride, and b) careers with flexible hours or autonomy over your time.
    Agreed and agreed. This is where I got stuck. Finally making ok money but living in a very expensive city. Barns within 30min commute $900/mo + for board (nothing fancy), anything cheaper is further away. Then mix in a job with regular hours M-F pretty much leaves riding on week-ends only or dealing with traffic to get to a barn after work along with all the other commuters, sometimes that 30min drive taking up to 1 hr. Basically getting home around 8pm on week nights, and still having to take care of dinner etc.

    I'm still trying to figure it out.



  8. #88
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    The job market is shit right now, I feel awful for young people starting out. I'm underemployed in an expensive area and the horses are again out of my life for the moment - I can save or I can ride, and I finally chose. Sucks. If I was doing it over, I'd do two things differently:

    1) Government. Teaching, bureacracy, police, fire. These are people who don't understand what it means to be fired. They get upset when they have to share in paying for their health insurance. They genuinely don't experience the same economy as the rest of us. Half the time, when they're "laid off" they get hired back in three months. And they have unions, which yes, forcibly extract dues and are a hassle to deal with, but do act as a gun pointed the right way - at the boss. I would 110% not touch private or non-profit work with a 10' pole if I had to do it over.

    2) Find a good, hard-working man to share the burden, and settle down in my mid twenties. Sure, I get wendy's annoyance at SAHMs. I shared it for a long time. But the women I know who made families with the right men have a degree of financial security and emotional support I don't have. I would make finding a strong husband a priority along with my career.

    Quote Originally Posted by morganpony86 View Post
    Be careful going into a biology career, if you're in the US especially. Funding for biological research is at an all-time alarming low, and many of us doing research are struggling... Combined, my SO & I bring in over $125k, with my salary being a major portion of that as the SO is still in school.
    I can see you might mean that you're one of the lucky ones who isn't struggling, but the second bit seems to undermine the first bit.


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  9. #89
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    Dec. 18, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by vacation1 View Post
    The job market is shit right now, I feel awful for young people starting out. I'm underemployed in an expensive area and the horses are again out of my life for the moment - I can save or I can ride, and I finally chose. Sucks. If I was doing it over, I'd do two things differently:

    1) Government. Teaching, bureacracy, police, fire. These are people who don't understand what it means to be fired. They get upset when they have to share in paying for their health insurance. They genuinely don't experience the same economy as the rest of us. Half the time, when they're "laid off" they get hired back in three months. And they have unions, which yes, forcibly extract dues and are a hassle to deal with, but do act as a gun pointed the right way - at the boss. I would 110% not touch private or non-profit work with a 10' pole if I had to do it over.

    2) Find a good, hard-working man to share the burden, and settle down in my mid twenties. Sure, I get wendy's annoyance at SAHMs. I shared it for a long time. But the women I know who made families with the right men have a degree of financial security and emotional support I don't have. I would make finding a strong husband a priority along with my career.



    I can see you might mean that you're one of the lucky ones who isn't struggling, but the second bit seems to undermine the first bit.
    Wow, bitter much?

    While it is true that "government" employees don't experience the same market fluctuations as "private" businesses, they also don't enjoy the chance for salary increases. My "government" job was sort of capped, whereas my dh's private career had more opportunity for growth. I never belonged to a union - even as a state employee - because not all government jobs are unionized. But in comparison, my benefit package was really impressive, something that many private employees never realize. In fact, even though my dh owns his own successful business, we pay unbelievable amounts for health insurance. Small companies have very little bargaining power for their employee benefits.

    Having a 2nd income in a family is a huge benefit; but so was having a roommate. I have *never* lived alone (despite the fact that I would have loved it). Financially, though, it didn't make sense. So, if you can find a hard-working man, woman, partner, parent or child to share some of your living expenses, you will be better off. Much of the rest of the world lives like this - it's only in 1st world countries that we even consider "getting our own place" as a 20-something. There is nothing wrong with sharing living expenses while you are young so you can save money, pay off debt and get ahead.

    Life is all about trade-offs.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by clanter View Post
    I need to bring up Air Traffice Controller once again; median annual wage of air traffic controllers was $108,040 in May 2010; those with 20 years of experience are eligible to retire at age 50. In addition, controllers are required to retire at age 56

    so there is pleanty of time to play with the horseys

    27,000 opening currently
    Get outta town! On the last OT day, I started a thread about jobs folks would like to try. Air Traffic Controller has been on my list since freshman year of college when a friend of mine who was not going to college was going to take some aptitude test for it. My family was too gung-ho-college for me to deviate from the accepted path. But man, talk about jobs that do take some brains (and other things) to do, and pay well! Apparently, however, high rates of depression and alcoholism in there.

    But whatevs! Air Traffic Controller, baby!
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #91
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    Feb. 18, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by rulex View Post
    Agreed and agreed. This is where I got stuck. Finally making ok money but living in a very expensive city. Barns within 30min commute $900/mo + for board (nothing fancy), anything cheaper is further away. Then mix in a job with regular hours M-F pretty much leaves riding on week-ends only or dealing with traffic to get to a barn after work along with all the other commuters, sometimes that 30min drive taking up to 1 hr. Basically getting home around 8pm on week nights, and still having to take care of dinner etc.

    I'm still trying to figure it out.
    Ummmm... I would KILL to get home at 8 on the weeknights I ride. I typically work 10-6, but when I ride I sneak out at 5. I leave for the barn at 5:30, get there around 7:15, on at 7:45 (7:30 if I'm lucky), off at 9. Out of the barn by 9:30 and back in the city by 10:30 or 10:45. Phew.

    So, just a reminder that being home at 8 is pretty darn lucky.



  12. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    Wow, bitter much?

    While it is true that "government" employees don't experience the same market fluctuations as "private" businesses, they also don't enjoy the chance for salary increases. My "government" job was sort of capped, whereas my dh's private career had more opportunity for growth. I never belonged to a union - even as a state employee - because not all government jobs are unionized. But in comparison, my benefit package was really impressive, something that many private employees never realize. In fact, even though my dh owns his own successful business, we pay unbelievable amounts for health insurance. Small companies have very little bargaining power for their employee benefits.

    Having a 2nd income in a family is a huge benefit; but so was having a roommate. I have *never* lived alone (despite the fact that I would have loved it). Financially, though, it didn't make sense. So, if you can find a hard-working man, woman, partner, parent or child to share some of your living expenses, you will be better off. Much of the rest of the world lives like this - it's only in 1st world countries that we even consider "getting our own place" as a 20-something. There is nothing wrong with sharing living expenses while you are young so you can save money, pay off debt and get ahead.

    Life is all about trade-offs.
    A continuation of the rant about women cannibalizing each other:

    Po' folks, you shouldn't do it either! The over-paid are just delighted by the fact that you are slinging sh!t at each other and not them. They'll spectate from their soft seats, well back from the fray.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #93
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    Jun. 9, 2012
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    I made, if I can remember correctly, just above $10k this year. That was working retail, and after next week I'll be unemployed (hopefully not for too long! I'm putting out loads of applications) because my store is closing. I can afford the horse expenses because I can't afford to move out, so therefore live at home. And, NO, I still couldn't afford to move out, even without having a horse!!
    I do not show - I go to the occasional playday/gymkhana event a few times a year, but that's it.

    My gelding costs me less than $200 a month for monthly necessities. (Feed, board, trimming.) And not much else for extras.



  14. #94
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    Jun. 7, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by clanter View Post
    I need to bring up Air Traffice Controller once again; median annual wage of air traffic controllers was $108,040 in May 2010; those with 20 years of experience are eligible to retire at age 50. In addition, controllers are required to retire at age 56

    so there is pleanty of time to play with the horseys

    27,000 opening currently
    Also the number one most stressful job in the universe ( this is a for real statistic, not just my opinion), because you have hundreds of lives depending on you at all times.

    When I got EMT certified there was huge emphasis on how to deal with stress and burnout and over and overr they were like, "But air traffic controllers. MAN."


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #95
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    Jan. 26, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by meupatdoes View Post
    Also the number one most stressful job in the universe ( this is a for real statistic, not just my opinion), because you have hundreds of lives depending on you at all times.
    ."
    Never phased me, raising two daughters was more stressful.

    Yes, it is a job that requires smarts.... normally they select just the very brightest... top 1 or 2% of IQs .... but there are a lot of smart people out there; not all can be doctors or vets.

    Combat ATC work was more difficult than public work as in military work you never knew what was going to happen however at civilian airports such as DFW you know to expect American Airlines Flight 346 to be arriving from LAX at 3:45PM every day


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    A continuation of the rant about women cannibalizing each other:

    Po' folks, you shouldn't do it either! The over-paid are just delighted by the fact that you are slinging sh!t at each other and not them. They'll spectate from their soft seats, well back from the fray.
    WTF are you even talking about?

    My point was simply that the stereotype of government being the "easy and safe" route isn't actually true, and there are pros and cons to all industries. I doubt most government employees can afford to show horses.

    And there is no reason to run out and find a man to share the financial burden - roommates also work, especially right out of school. Save your money and get out of debt from school, and you'll have a much better chance of being able to afford your hobbies than someone who wants it all, right away.

    Sure it would be great to have a big apartment all to yourself upon college graduation, but it will probably leave you with little money to save, and certainly not much to spend on riding. Everything is a trade-off.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #97
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    What career will give you enough money without making you dread work is very individual. People have different tolerances and stressors, so you really have to know what sorts of things bother you. And make sure you find out what the job is really like - preferably by shadowing. Oh, and you can get laid off of a government job when there is a reduction in force - I was and the job was never reinstated.

    Re: air traffic controller. I nearly went that route. Was burning out on cruelty investigation and animal control when all the ATCs were fired and there was a big push to hire. They gave the aptitude test locally, so I signed up. I remember a good part of the test was pictures of radar screens with very limited time to answer how to direct the planes. I knew I was having midair collisions all over the place! So I was shocked when I was told I was accepted for training pending a physical. I went out of state for the physical only to find they postponed it. With more time to think, I decided it wasnt for me. I am not a person who likes to make rapid decisions. I believed I would be stressed out even if I was doing well. Might have been okay, but more likely not a good personality match.
    I ended up becoming a teacher. I enjoyed that for about 18 years. Unfortunately, changing State and Federal requirements and changes in attitudes of kids and parents have made it much less enjoyable, or even doable. While I make enough to have a horse at a modest stable and do a schooling show (when we were both sound) here and there, it does not allow much flexibility or enough money for high-level showing.

    The only thing I think about is that if I had become an ATC, I would be retired now!



  18. #98
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    First of all, OP, apply to vet school anyway!

    You think since you are not one of those perfect little 4.0 students that apply that you won't get in. Not all of those that get accepted have 4.0s, actually. That's why the average is lower. Vet schools look at more than just grades. Your experience, your attitudes, and your values are all considered. I would have a back up plan, to be realistic, but plan on applying for three years in a row. Set time aside to start the application process this summer and into the fall. Study for the GRE (or other test, if the vet school requires a different one). Go get the full information on the application now and look it over. You are more than your grades. And vet schools NEED large animal vets. They have an abundance of small animal vets. If you don't get in the first time, contact the vet school office and ask to speak with an adviser to discuss your application weaknesses. They will tell you what to do before you apply again. Don't give up!

    I went to Colorado State for several years as an animal science and biology major, ran low on money and confidence and didn't know what to do so I joined the US Navy as a Hospital Corpsman. MY horse went with me. It was the BEST decision for me. I did great on the enlisted side and was accepted for a scholarship program and went back to college (GWU), courtesy of the USN, for two years before being commissioned as an officer in 2001. I was in the war and served until 2006 driving ships and commanding divisions onboard ships. My last ship duty was leading 40 sailors as an engineering officer. I bought my own 9 acre farm in Virginia (near Norfolk) and brought my horses home from a boarding barn after my first deployment. I met my husband in the USN (he was at a different command and one rank apart so entirely legal). He owned a house in a subdivision. After we were married, we sold both of our properties and moved further south (where my husband is from) it was my farm that earned us enough to buy the bigger farm we have now and keep our mortgage payments low. I went back to school (grad school in biology) while hubby worked. Then, I applied to vet school. I found out I was pregnant and the baby was due the same week vet school started, so, even if I had gotten in the first time (I was on the three year plan, too) I would have not been able to go. I thought I would reapply the following year, but taking care of our son has been a joy and even more important than what I did during the war. So, yeah, I run the cattle farm and take care of our son while hubby works. I'll get back to school, but vet school is out for me. I wouldn't be happy being away from our son for that long and if I wait until our son is older, I would be worried about being injured as a large animal vet, LOL! I will find a new path, either teaching or in a science field. I have even considered going back into the Navy Reserve (they call regularly <eye roll>).

    The jobs I had before going to CSU and during college include: police service aide, vet tech (not certified), wrangler on a bison ranch, dairy calf feeder and working on a couple of other large ranches with the cow/calves. I learned to appreciate cattle back at CSU with Dr Grandin. That is why we raise them now.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    WTF are you even talking about?

    My point was simply that the stereotype of government being the "easy and safe" route isn't actually true, and there are pros and cons to all industries.
    Well, it is safe, or as safe as a job can be. Government workers can get force-reduced, but the job is still much safer than private market jobs. As for easy, well...a job's a job. If you're doing the same job in government as in private it won't get easier or harder, although the stresses are probably different.

    I don't mind saying that a government job is safe. I'm in a government job. I could earn much more money leaving and just doing my job civie-side, but I like the safety: the benefits package, the pension plan. That's just how I am. A good friend of mine is the exact opposite, he's working on some kind of venture capital thing. He makes pretty much nothing now, but if he succeeds he'll get richer than I'll ever be. I'm in a government job where my salary is set, its steady little increases are set, and it will never take off into the stratosphere, and that's fine. I'm perfectly fine with "safe"


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  20. #100
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    The military is a government job. Not sure how 'safe' that is though.



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