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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2012
    Posts
    15

    Default Careers that can support the expenses of horses!

    Hey everyone,
    I graduated from high school two years ago and im at loss at what I should do as a career.
    If someone was to ask what I wanted to do in life, i'd answer with riding and showing horses. BUT, what kind of careers are able to support this life style??
    I've taken some university courses off and on but without a set goal I have little motivation for school. I also don't have the $ to invest myself extensively into the horse world to become a trainer or anything. My goals in riding are to show at AA hunter jumper shows successfully, so I need a career where i make enough money to afford the horse,training and expenses. Im already/have shown at this level so I know how expensive it can be.
    aside from riding, im somewhat interested in sciences and helping people. I've looked into nursing but im worried that the salary wouldn't be enough. So coth PLEASE help me out!!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2004
    Location
    Whidbey Is, Wash.
    Posts
    9,595

    Default

    I hate to be a Debbie Downer...but this probably needed to be figured out while you were in HS and had access to a career/college/whatever counselor.

    What are you CURRENTLY doing?
    Aisha, my heart from 03/06/1986 to 08/22/2008.

    COTH's official mini-donk enabler.
    Odie, aka the Evil Burrito, is on Facebook.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2006
    Location
    Knoxville TN
    Posts
    1,306

    Default

    Surgeon, Attorney, Corrupt Politician, Drug Dealer, Pre-school care assistant*

    *I am lying about this one.


    19 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2005
    Location
    Elmwood, Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,368

    Default

    Consider a dental hygienist or another allied medical field.
    Some, like nuclear medicine technician, can be quite well
    paid.
    Robin from Dancing Horse Hill
    Elmwood, Wisconsin


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2004
    Location
    Catonsville, MD
    Posts
    6,885

    Default

    Technology. It has the benefit of being portable. Many medical careers too. Law, not so much these days.
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09



    3 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2008
    Posts
    955

    Default

    Registered nurses are very well paid. But don't do it for the money! People going into nursing for the $$ make horrible nurses. I am going to school for a BA in Bio then I will be applying to get my CLS (clinical laboratory scientist) license. It makes a good salary but RN's do make more than a CLS.
    Here is a good site that you can research some careers and how much they make: http://www.payscale.com/
    Dawn

    Patience and Consistency are Your Friends


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2008
    Posts
    3,504

    Default

    Healthcare right now is good because there will always be a need for caregivers - and those don't just have to be nurses - and some don't involve years of schooling for instance - xray techs - can make decent starting salaries + opportunities to specialize in certain areas like mammography, CT or PET scanning, ultrasound etc; other areas could be physical or occupational therapist, Signlanguage, nutritionist - which could be great field to enter into now w/ all this obesity, pharmaceutical or medical instrument sales rep good money but need college degree, I work in commercial real estate and quite frankly there is great money to be had in that field some of the 30 y/o brokers in my office are making $180,000++ but that would depend on where you live.. the senior brokers in my office make over $800,000+ but to earn that kind of $ you have to work hard but that work can often be done outside the office..



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    4,066

    Default

    Comptroller of small city, worked very well for one individual....and there was not a college degree requirement


    17 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2001
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    6,819

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    Quote Originally Posted by clanter View Post
    Comptroller of small city, worked very well for one individual....and there was not a college degree requirement


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    4,917

    Default

    Just a word of warning – nursing isn’t always a wide open field – I know people in the profession, and NPR recently ran a long story about how so many students have rushed to nursing – because it was sure thing for a good job – only to find there are now more graduates then positions open.

    Many hospitals are not employing as many nurses as they once did, instead opting for various types of nursing and doctor ASSISTANTS that come in at a lower pay grade.

    And what part of the country you live in will play a big part as well – around here, a nursing profession, while it can be lucrative (my mother in law is an RN and makes 6 figures), it isn’t going to cover cost of living PLUS A showing.

    Basically you are asking – what careers pay in the very highest brackets (6 figures) while allowing the flexibility to attend horse shows. That is a small pool of jobs, sought after by the very best, brightest, and most competitive people in this country.

    I know a few “young” people (in their early 30’s) who make enough that they would be able to afford to show on the A circuit (if that was their thing).

    One works at Google, he was valedictorian of his high school and college classes, and after paying his dues for 10 years at various companies, now as a very well paying, flexible job at Google. He jokingly call him boy genius, he is very smart, and VERY driven, a work-a-holic.

    The next, works for a private investment group – he manages all of their “green” investments, he has a double major undergraduate degree from Cornell, and an MBA from Duke (and worked managing various non profits in between).

    And yet another – works for a tech firm in development, after she graduated from UC Berkeley, she landed her job with this tech company and worked there while attending Stanford to earn her MBA. Once she graduated from Stanford, she was promoted, and now makes a very comfortable living, and has some scheduling flexibility.

    And lastly, a young attorney – She earned her law degree and started at a small firm, grew her own clientele through her excellent and detailed work (real estate law), then joined a “big law” firm where she was able to have her own assistants – no longer working from 7 am to 9pm each night. She is truly a standout in her field, and one of the youngest at her level.

    It’s a tall order – to earn enough to support yourself, AND an “A” show horse – but it can be done if you are driven enough, and have access to enough opportunities.

    You said you already have down A showing – who paid for it? Your parents? What do they do for a living?


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 30, 2009
    Posts
    1,891

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KateWooten View Post
    Surgeon, Attorney, Corrupt Politician, Drug Dealer, Pre-school care assistant*

    *I am lying about this one.
    You forgot the top two:

    rich widow
    royalty
    "I've spent most of my life riding horses. The rest I've just wasted". - Anonymous


    7 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2003
    Posts
    4,622

    Default

    Well, I make a very solid living as a consultant.

    I think the part that might be missing here is it doesn't come instantly. There's pretty much no job that, right out of undergraduate school, will pay you that kind of money and have you work so few hours that you can go show thursday, friday, and saturday basically every week.

    I'm a consultant, and my work is cyclical-- I have busy seasons and quiet seasons. I can often work from home. I am 4 years out of college this May and I am just about ready to buy a horse now. By the time I'm 30, I would have no problem purchasing or supporting an A circuit horse. I've been in this career 2 years and I got a 30% raise last year and I am expecting 20% in the next 12 months as well. With that raise, I will break 6 figures by age 27.

    It's also a question of the realities of adult life. Usually, work that pays well, demands a lot, especially in the early years. You may have the $$ but not the time or energy to show. You might have the time but not the $$. At that point in your career, the investment of time into the career itself is what will give you the most flexibility later on, so my advise to you would be not to flush it away in pursuit of the almighty dollar.

    Wouldn't trade my job for anything. There's just very few instant tickets, and for those that will get them, you're already behind by spending 2 years spinning your wheels trying to align yourself with a career that will make you stacks of money instead of something you like and are good at.

    and I guess I'll be the one to throw out there that having a supportive other half helps a lot. I don't mean one that just pays for everything, though I guess that would be nice, but one that respects that you really like a hobby that requires blowing seriously large sums of money on an animal that seems to have an exceptional gift for rendering itself useless in the course of about 2 seconds.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
    14,130

    Default

    You better do something you love. You are going to have to do it a lot to pay the bills. An awful lot.


    8 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep. 4, 2012
    Location
    Southeast US
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    1,054

    Default

    Go here: http://www.bls.gov/ooh/ It's the Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook. You can use the search tool on that page to select careers by median income, projected number of new jobs, and a couple of other things.

    Following the advice of the OOH is how I ended up doing what I'm doing now. I was in a position to go back to school, so I made a list of a half-dozen or so careers that all sounded appealing. Then, I looked them up in the OOH. One had both lots of projected future growth and expected high salaries. So, I went with that one. It has worked out pretty well.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2006
    Location
    At the back of the line
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    4,016

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by clanter View Post
    Comptroller of small city, worked very well for one individual....and there was not a college degree requirement
    Heck any kind of bookkeeper seems to work the same way--for a time
    “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” Peter Drucker



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep. 21, 2009
    Location
    Queens, NY
    Posts
    1,546

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine View Post
    You better do something you love. You are going to have to do it a lot to pay the bills. An awful lot.
    I go with this.
    VP Horse & Carriage Association of NYC

    https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-F...ref=ts&fref=ts



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2011
    Location
    On a horse.
    Posts
    395

    Default

    It depends on what you're motivated to do. I'm a university professor, but before I decided to get my PhD, I trained horses for a living. I realised my body wasn't going to last forever, and that (for me at least) it was better to be an owner than the employee, so I decided upon a career that offered me enough pay to support my horse life, and that also gave me show season "off". Luckily, I teach for a university that's accommodating, and so instead of being home out west right now, I'm in Florida for the season and teaching my courses online. There are trade offs though: many people who become academics will tell you that it's an arduous and isolating path. Ultimately, you have to choose a career you love, or decide you love your horses so much you're willing to take any job to support them.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 27, 2009
    Posts
    1,626

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    I'm a technical recruiter. I make a good living but if I could go back and change my career path I would take my parent's recommendation and get a computer science degree. Careers in the tech sector will only continue to grow and there is a dearth of qualified CS graduates here in the US. My recommendation to those who choose this route is to research programs extensively and only focus on the programs that are well respected with the top companies. The quality of education varies widely and there are far too many programs that are completely worthless when it comes to giving you the skills that will lead to lucrative employment.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
    Location
    southeast Georgia
    Posts
    2,867

    Default

    The best jobs go to people who are highly motivated and smart. They generally have other outstanding qualities, too, such as the ability to think out of the box and be excellent leaders. They usually love what they do. These are not always the people who just want a big salary.

    I teach at a university, and I tell my students this all the time. No boss is going to hire you at a generous salary just because you hung on long enough to get a B.A. degree and think you deserve more than an entry level job.

    OP, I hate to be rough on you, but if I were hiring, I wouldn't hire you. Not after reading your post.
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne


    6 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2008
    Posts
    405

    Default

    Teaching. Like nursing, you better love the job (which I do). Weekdays I'm generally at the barn by 3:00, I have winter and spring break, and summer off. The first few years you'll be working many, many hours after school, but at this point I can get all my work done before school.


    1 members found this post helpful.

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