The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
    Posts
    2,429

    Default Hay Hay Hay....

    (hahaha...just typed that title and heard in my head "Fat Albert"...and realized no one would know what I was laughing at anymore!)
    anyway:

    I'm trying to look at all options for hay storage on the widdle ghetto barn. One of my ideas is the prefab garage/metal shed type ideas, where, of course you have options of height/doors, etc.

    So, it got me thinking? IF you have no idea yet of your hay supplier (not established)....what? would you seasoned veterans alert, suggest, make mention of in terms of: deliveries/stacking/accessability to opening. I admit? I have no (!) idea what to expect or be prepared for, other than: best location for access of large truck/wagon. Beyond that? I don't know what is norm? I mean, do they usually offer : we dump in front, or: we dump inside and need 'blank' sized door opening, or: we unload and re stack for a price?

    My biggest concern is understanding what hay guys usually insist on in: height and door size opening?

    TIA!
    ayrabz
    "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
    --Jimmy Buffett



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2007
    Location
    North-Central IL
    Posts
    5,672

    Default

    I had to comment and say I heard Fat Albert when I read your title! As far as your question, it depends on how people where you are tend to 'do it'. Here they bring me a rack with hay on it, I throw down the elevator, and the hay man loads it on and me and a friend (victim) stack it up. I would assume, as with anything equine, taller and wider is always better.
    Quote Originally Posted by enjoytheride View Post
    That's got to be expensive, how much oil can you press out of a chipmunk?



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
    Posts
    2,429

    Default

    hehehe Mosey...a fellow olderthandirt cartoon recall !
    yeah...I think? I was just trying to find out IF there is a door /roof height/access and width? I should be aware of for hay barns. I noticed another thread as well in re: to stacking costs and how stacking HIGH is what is difficult physically. Therefore, want to add to this thread/question: would you guys suggest a long and low hay storage area or tall and shorter? as best ?
    ayrabz
    "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
    --Jimmy Buffett



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2007
    Location
    North-Central IL
    Posts
    5,672

    Default

    Personally, I'd prefer long and low, but it would depend on how much hay you need to store, really. You don't *have* to have the hay delivered all the way into the building, they can throw it off by the door, too. I'd say find out how tall a loaded hay rack is and make it at least a foot taller than that...
    Quote Originally Posted by enjoytheride View Post
    That's got to be expensive, how much oil can you press out of a chipmunk?



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2002
    Location
    East of Dog River
    Posts
    6,033

    Default

    ANother one that heard Fat Albert but not the cartoon version. I heard the original Cosby story from one of the albums he put out in the 60s.

    As to the question, depends on things like convenience (you can fix), heat, humi dity, rainfall, ground conditions when wet, and other things you cannot fix.

    ETA - the original story was called Buck Buck and it might be on youtube....... and in the distance we heard "Hey Hey HEY!!!' and the ground started shaking. 'What was that??" That's Fat Albert the baddest buck buck breaker in the world!! slightly paraphrased because my cd copies are in the Jeep behind a wall of snow
    Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

    Member: Incredible Invisbles


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
    Posts
    2,429

    Default

    HAHAHA, sk: ashamed to admit, YES...I recall it from that FIRST as well (!) (but I figured much more recognition from the cartoon show).............I remember thinking his 'Noah' routine (album?) was side busting. (How long can you tread water?)
    In re: hay barn: yes, I understand there are MANY factors....location will be limited in choices as this is a very small property with not many spots left....but I was concerned? a bit more in: IF a door/loading area should be a minimum? of some height/width, and IF building the storage area to be 'tall' to stack higher? or long instead is more advantageous.
    ayrabz
    "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
    --Jimmy Buffett



  7. #7

    Default

    we do not hand unload however we do have a machine (think Lowes construction trucks) that unloads for us and it requires a 9x9 foot opening to enter and unload
    tamara
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2002
    Location
    East of Dog River
    Posts
    6,033

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ayrabz View Post
    HAHAHA, sk: ashamed to admit, YES...I recall it from that FIRST as well (!) (but I figured much more recognition from the cartoon show).............I remember thinking his 'Noah' routine (album?) was side busting. (How long can you tread water?)
    In re: hay barn: yes, I understand there are MANY factors....location will be limited in choices as this is a very small property with not many spots left....but I was concerned? a bit more in: IF a door/loading area should be a minimum? of some height/width, and IF building the storage area to be 'tall' to stack higher? or long instead is more advantageous.
    I have all the albums transfered to CDs for in vehicle listening and I love Noah. Also love Chicken Heart, The Lone Ranger and the one with Old Weird Harold and the theatre statue

    Now back to the regular programming - don't make something with just a man door, but either a largish sliding door or double doors so the opening is big enough. Going long or up is personal preference.
    Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

    Member: Incredible Invisbles



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
    Posts
    2,429

    Default

    Bless ya, Tamara---that is really (!) helpful!
    Still thinking of you and family...
    ayrabz
    "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
    --Jimmy Buffett


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2012
    Posts
    84

    Default

    A lot depends on where you live, bale size, how hay is bought in your area, if you have snow loads, etc. Where I used to live (So. Cal), we had the feed store deliver and I stacked the hay in the barn. The bales were 125 lb bales so I only stacked them 4 high. Since we could order more hay anytime and have it delivered, it wasn't necessary to store more than a ton at a time. And since I stored in my barn, it was pretty easy all the way around.

    Where I live now, almost no one delivers. You buy directly from the grower and pick it up yourself. That means driving there, loading the hay onto a trailer, driving back and unloading and stacking when you get home. Access to your property is something to consider too. I live in a rural/mountain area so access to my property is by truck only. I usually had to park the trailer at the highway and off load my hay onto a pick up truck, then shuttle the hay up to my house. Lots of fun. Supply is also a factor to consider. Since farmers typically can only get one or two cuttings here, and since all of the hay is gone by the early fall, I had to buy all my hay by the end of the summer and store it until next year. I typically used to buy and store about 10 - 12 tons every year. Lots of fun doing that all by yourself - lucky they were only 90 lb bales. My old place had ample storage space so I could stack 5 or 6 high if I wanted to. Obviously, the foot print for stacking higher is smaller than lower so that might be a consideration. Also, allow for some room to move when you're stacking hay. You can stack to the rafters, but as you fill your hay storage space, it becomes more of a struggle to stack those top bales.

    Now I have a hay guy who will deliver one ton at a time to me - and he unloads and stacks it for me. I pay a premium for this, but he has really great hay so I'm happy to pay extra for it. Out here a good, consistent hay supplier is a rare find.

    With the set up I have now, I have 3/4 of one garage bay for hay storage. My hay guy can easily unload and stack the hay in there with no trouble. If you go with a shed type of set up, I'd think it would be the same type of arrangement unless you're getting one you can drive into. I'd also allow for room to turn a truck or truck and trailer around in front of where you're going to have your hay stored.



  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ayrabz View Post
    Bless ya, Tamara---that is really (!) helpful!
    Still thinking of you and family...
    thanks sure anytime...t.
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
    Posts
    2,429

    Default

    and thanks too, Teddy....LOTS to think on there.
    sk: you've got great taste.

    I am really checking the footage to property lines as well as the contours/topography (low, or high...decline or rising or flat)....to TRY? to be aware of our few options of location and type or size.
    ayrabz
    "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
    --Jimmy Buffett



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
    Location
    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
    Posts
    10,190

    Default

    I remember Fat Albert too!
    Also loved Bill Cosby's routine about cattle discussing Hoof & Mouth Disease "Wipe that foam off your mouth!"

    Back to OP's HR subject - it depends.
    Are you going to be stacking the hay yourself?

    IIWM and "Yes" - I say go long & low - I can stack to my height (5'5" = about 5 rows of small square bales) but after that, tossing bales on top wrecks my shoulders/arms/Life for the next day or two.

    If your hayguy includes stacking then just make sure he has clearance to get his loaded wagon as close as possible.
    My hayguy pulls through my indoor - 16' height at the beams - then into the attached barn - 10' clearance - to unload onto pallets I have inside.
    One year he brought a wagon that turned out a skosh too tall to make it out.
    He had to go home for a chainsaw to cut the wagon backboards down so he could get out w/o pulling down my crossbeams!
    I still joke with him and ask if he's bringing "My" wagon when he delivers...
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2005
    Location
    Elmwood, Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,384

    Default

    We used to do our own small squares and, when weather
    looked like it would turn, we would park the wagons in our
    indoor arena until we could unload. To get a full load into
    a building, you want a 14' sidewall to the building and a
    door at least 13' high. Helpful would be a building with
    doors on each end that opened at least 10' wide. My DH
    suggests a built-up pad for the building of "sewer rock"
    and put raised flooring (e.g. pallets) down to stack the hay
    on top of. He also suggests either no sides or venting at
    the bottom of the sides, the top of the sides and the roof
    peak. You might also consider a building with fabric sides
    for lower cost and easy load/unload.
    Robin from Dancing Horse Hill
    Elmwood, Wisconsin



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness