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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    17,737

    Default How much hair can I take off without blanketing?

    I've started riding Dove, who came off the track last August, and she just worries herself up into quite the sweat. She worries before the ride, during the ride and after the ride. I know it's just a time thing and she'll settle as we get a routine established, but she's got a ton of hair and cooling her off is pretty much limited to crossing my fingers that it is windy enough and warm enough outside that she will dry without chilling.

    I'd love to just body clip her (I'm usually a HUGE fan of just taking it all off!) but the barn is really not set up to dick around with the blanketing required and it would be overkill, anyway. She really only sweats up on her neck and shoulder.

    She lives outside with a run and two other horses. There is plenty of room for them all to get inside, and she's second in command. She has not been blanketed all winter and has done fine. They get plenty of hay and she's in good weight.

    Can I clip some amount off and not have to blanket, or at least not have to blanket regularly? The apron clip found here will really pretty much hit everything that is soaking when we work.

    Here's our 10 day forecast, to give an idea of what the weather's been like.

    I do have a complete wardrobe that will fit her, but it's going to be tough to do anything other than put her in a blanket and leave her in that one or only dress her when the temps get unusually low.

    Thoughts?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Posts
    1,094

    Default

    I am in Colorado Springs at 7000 feet. I clipped just a little of the check and about 2 inches wide up the throat. Helped quite a bit. Start minimal. See how it works.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2008
    Location
    Nowhere, Maryland
    Posts
    3,481

    Default

    I'd start with a little less than the apron one-- just the neck and belly one maybe. The longer you hold off the warmer it will be, right? So if you just do a minimal amount now and more in 3-4 weeks that might be best.

    That said, from looking at those temps, you could probably get away with a trace clip and leaving a sheet or 100 gram type blanket on 24/7 if you wanted to go that route. It is warmer there than here (eastern Maryland).



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2011
    Posts
    2,177

    Default

    whoops, looked at the wrong pic



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2006
    Location
    Larkspur, Colo.
    Posts
    5,132

    Default

    I have done the apron clip on two of my horses and left them naked through the winter and they were fine ... with one exception.

    Last winter it when it got down to 10 below zero for a few days I found my mare shivering in her stall one morning. She is a fat little thing and hardy, but it was freakin' COLD and she doesn't get a lot of hay, due to the fatness, so she got a blanket that day.

    I also live on the Palmer Divide -- 7200 feet.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2012
    Posts
    748

    Default

    You can clip the neck, but stay away from the chest. If it gets windy and she can't protect her chest (because its clipped) its awfully easy for her to get a chill...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 19, 2009
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    785

    Default

    For those sorts of high/low temperatures I used a rainsheet with no insulation over a trace clip that didn't include the belly below the elbow to stifle line (belly left furry). On sunny days the horse got a bit sweaty on his shoulders when the temp was in the upper 40s and he'd been standing in the sun.

    Contrary to popular belief, he is quite capable of fluffing his coat up under the rainsheet in order to give himself the degree of insulation he needs at the moment. It's typically flat during the warmer day, and fluffy at night when it gets colder. Your horse is accustomed to fluffing her own coat and should be quite capable of doing the same.

    I don't clip the belly at all because it's a huge area to leave exposed and can't be covered by a blanket. My horses have been consistently warm enough in midweight blankets when horses with proper trace clips have been freezing with two blankets. The only reason the trace clip includes the belly is because the clip was for working harness horses in Britain. They have wet, muddy winters and the horses kicked up wet and muck onto their bellies. Clipping that hair meant a quicker clean up at the end of the work day. Where I am it freezes solid, and I'm usually riding inside anyway so I don't have the mucky belly concerns.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2004
    Location
    South Park
    Posts
    3,357

    Default

    I wouldn't clip the belly but neck should be okay. Start with a minimal clip and see how that goes. You can expand later.
    A friend told me I was delusional. I almost fell off my unicorn.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2005
    Location
    Unionville, PA
    Posts
    3,670

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RedHorses View Post

    I don't clip the belly at all because it's a huge area to leave exposed and can't be covered by a blanket. My horses have been consistently warm enough in midweight blankets when horses with proper trace clips have been freezing with two blankets. The only reason the trace clip includes the belly is because the clip was for working harness horses in Britain. They have wet, muddy winters and the horses kicked up wet and muck onto their bellies. Clipping that hair meant a quicker clean up at the end of the work day. Where I am it freezes solid, and I'm usually riding inside anyway so I don't have the mucky belly concerns.
    Picture please . I like this idea, but am wondering if it might look rather odd!
    Delaware Park Canter Volunteer
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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 2001
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    6,744

    Default

    I'm in Maryland, which is more mild (not dissimilar from your forecast but we rarely go below 15 even at night) but very dank in the winter. For years I've done a modified apron -- strip from top of neck to chest and across the shoulder, and then to JUST behind the girth for the belly (I actually just make a right angle turn after the girth and do not bother with the taper they show). My guys live out, are easy keepers, and usually in full work. This clip strikes a very good balance between keeping them warm enough and keeping them dry enough in work.

    I would agree with others that you might start with a little less to see how it goes.
    The big man -- no longer an only child

    His new little brother



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 19, 2009
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    785

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kcmel View Post
    Picture please . I like this idea, but am wondering if it might look rather odd!
    I'm used to it now, but yes, it did look odd at first. I've been doing variants of this clip for um... nine winters give or take. On mine and other people's horses too (I refuse to try and count how many ).

    I don't wrap the "racing stripe" round my horse's haunch any more, but I have done for furrier or sweatier horses. I have also pushed the top of the racing stripe higher on the horse's sides (up to a little above the bottom of a CC saddle flap) without issue. I have seen people elegantly curve that elbow to stifle line down so you can't really see the line between clip and long hair, but their horses suffered from the cold and the ones I clipped didn't. It looked much nicer, but my horse's comfort is more important than an elegant clip line. It gets into the -20s for weeks every winter.

    https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-r...00/Nov7A11.jpg

    Hmmm... maybe I should give this clip the name "racing stripe" clip.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    17,737

    Default

    Hmmm. Alright. Sounds like the consensus is "some"

    I'll start with the strip down her neck first and see what that gives us. Thank to all for pointing out it's best to start with less anyway...Dove does have more of a thin long coat versus a the short but thick and dense coat of my other horses. This is her first real winter, I believe (she came from Texas) so it might be nice to go easy on her, right?

    Regardless, it will be a few days, as it has gone to f*%&*$ing cold at the barn with the wind. We've had a super mild winter and it picks NOW to snow and get bitter cold? Sigh.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2008
    Location
    Nowhere, Maryland
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    3,481

    Default

    Usually that happens just AFTER I clip, so you're lucky



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
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    Default

    Just an update here for anyone interested:

    Took the strip off the neck (essentially what was between the jugulars) early this week. Helped some. Not really enough, though, and today was nearly 60 when I rode, so I took the chest (JUST the chest, none of the shoulder) and between the front legs and under the girth today before I rode. Not even the neck and belly noted here...narrower than that. Can't really see any of the chest or girth clip from the side.

    And I still had a sweaty mess. Sigh.

    Could have been just how WARM it was today, though, so I might give it a couple days and see where we are.

    I am getting terribly tempted, though, to just give her a 'chaser clip and toss a sheet on her and call it good! Hoping that the shedding will start to aid my cause here, or she is going to be quite the patchwork pony if I keep taking it off bit by bit



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 12, 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    7,164

    Default

    This is exactly the clip I do for my TB mare. She runs hot, and goes out naked above 40; less than that and she's wearing a lightweight sheet, just to keep the chill off.

    I had to bump her to a midweight when we had a week's worth of single to negative digit weather, but otherwise she is toasty in her sheet most days, and sweaty and itchy in this new 40+ semi-spring weather if I forget to pull it.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
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    Default

    I gave up today and did this to Dove. We're heading into a weekend of nearly 70 degree temps so no worries coming up. Hopefully we're done with really cold weather!



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