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  1. #21
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    Nov. 21, 2005
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    Granite Falls, WA
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    With Ulcergard, I have seen results in as little as 3 days. That speaks volumes to me.



  2. #22
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iberiansyes View Post
    I for one have had very good luck with generic omeprazole from raceprerace. What is patented is the delivery system to get the omeprazole through the hind gut. Ulcergard and Gastrogard have different patents but there are many, many ways to skin that cat. I think it is worth trying it. The difference in cost is about $500 for a treatment. There is a place in this world for generics, and many of these very common drugs, when the patent expires on the human medicines, they move it over to the veterinary world to get an extra window of big profits. KNowing that Canada has good quality controls in human and veterinary medicine gives me confidence. IN fact, I just ordered generic omeprazole from Canada for this season.
    Nobody's arguing whether generic drugs work or not. But unprotected omeprazole, even the "brand name" kind, is functionally useless as stomach acid will destroy the drug. If there is no buffering or coating agent, all the omeprazole in the world isn't going to help. And some products that are available do not buffer or coat the drug, or they do so insufficiently.

    And it is incorrect to say that omeprazole must be delivered to the "hindgut". Omeprazole works in the small intestine.
    Click here before you buy.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2008
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    Delaware Valley
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    I used a generic that I got through my vet. My trainer uses the same generic on her FEI horses including the super sensitive GP horse. It worked immediately and well on my mare, and I haven't needed to repeat it. I can let people know the name via PM.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2011
    Posts
    73

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    Just as an update, I talked with my vet and we decided to put my mare on Gastrogard, which I was able to find for $31.99 tube. I am seeing a very big improvement. There was noticeable difference at about 3 days, and things really started to turn around about the 5th day. My vet discussed a whole range of options with me, & several that would have been much cheaper. But he did say that if you want the gold standard treatment for equine ulcers, Gastrogard or Ulcergard is the way to go. I am also going to try SmartGut Ultra pellets for maintenance, and add some additional low NSC teff hay to her rations. Thankfully, spring is coming, which means she'll get back to pasture time too. She tends to gain weight easily, though, so keeping food in front of her has its own issues. Hoping the supplement might help. Anyone tried the SmartGut Ultra?



  5. #25
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    Unfortunately the gulf between "gold standard" treatments like Gastrogard and the multitude of supplements and nutraceuticals is Grand Canyon-sized. When you're done with the GG, make sure you wean the horse off rather than just stopping it abruptly, and if you are so inclined pick one of those supplements for "maintenance", but don't delude yourself that any of them is going to be enormously helpful.
    Click here before you buy.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Posts
    2,188

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    What about those "blue pop rocks" I have seen mentioned in other ulcers threads?
    "All top hat and no canter". *Graureiter*



  7. #27
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    Those are what I use when I need to use omeprazole. Thankfully that is only every now and then--mostly when trailering a long ways to a show with my one slightly "emotional" horse. I also just had an injured one come home with me for a month of stall rest and he is PISSED about the confinement so he's getting a short course of low-dose pop rocks as well.
    Click here before you buy.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2010
    Posts
    770

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    Just chiming in here in case cost is an issue. We do not live in the fancy sport horse world of diagnostics, insured horses, and weekly jog outs looking for trouble. $1500 month is more than most of the horses cost here, so it's not an option. She recommends ranitidine 3x a day as an option and says it will work over time, not quite as well as omeprazole, but a fraction of the cost. More work, and longer treatment time, but gets good results.

    PKN



  9. #29
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    Ranitidine is a very nice option with the caveat of having to dose multiple times per day, and that it is not DIRT cheap. One has to hunt for a deal, but the price is obviously much, MUCH better than brand name omeprazole.
    Click here before you buy.



  10. #30
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    Nov. 9, 2004
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    Elizabethtown, KY
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    Where can one purchase said pop rocks? I am in need for one horse who is ulcery and showing improvement on ulcer guard. Other than the pills, has anyone found tube omeprazole that is generic but properly buffered?
    Destiny is not a matter of chance, it is a matter of choice; it is not a thing to be waited for, it is a thing to be achieved. - William Jennings Bryan

    http://www.halcyon-hill.com



  11. #31
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    www.omeprazoledirect.com

    They also sell a "tube" form.
    Click here before you buy.



  12. #32
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    Jun. 12, 2009
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    481

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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    unprotected omeprazole, even the "brand name" kind, is functionally useless as stomach acid will destroy the drug. If there is no buffering or coating agent, all the omeprazole in the world isn't going to help. And some products that are available do not buffer or coat the drug, or they do so insufficiently.
    Sorry to hijack but,

    Hey deltawave, I have been arguing this point with my trainer/BO as this is my understanding as well. Do you know where I can find any studies or anything that I can print out and bring to her to prove what I've been saying? I've been looking but I can't seem to find one, but I'll be the first to admit that I am somewhat searching challenged.
    "Be the change you want to see in the world."
    ~Mahatma Gandhi



  13. #33
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    Gosh, that's kind of like trying to find a reference stating why we should wear seat belts or brush our teeth! It's not really something that is argued by anyone, unless they are completely ignorant or stubbornly clinging to their personal dogma for some reason.

    There is a little blurb on the Abler site, if that helps?

    http://article.abler.com/abprazole-b.../#.UUh3eIy9KSM

    Otherwise maybe she would listen to a vet?
    Click here before you buy.



  14. #34
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    Jun. 12, 2009
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    481

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    Yeah, I know it is. This is why I'm so frustrated with her on this issue. Unfortunately the blurb from the Abler site probably won't be enough. She's one of those people that if it isn't in print from a vet or scholar, then someone is just pulling it out of thin air. Don't get me wrong I love her to pieces but everyone has their quirks right?

    There has to be a paper or something somewhere that they studied this because well, how else would we know this to begin with? Even if it's just something from a lab where they show that omeprazole breaks down in an acidic environment. I'll keep searching, but let me know if you run across it.
    "Be the change you want to see in the world."
    ~Mahatma Gandhi



  15. #35
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    Nov. 9, 2004
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    Elizabethtown, KY
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    I'm with your trainer in wanting to see actual documentation, not just hearsay from vendors.

    Here is a blurb (from a vendor site)

    Omeprazole is broken down by stomach acid. For this reason, Losec capsules contain the omeprazole in pellets that have a special enteric coat to protect the omeprazole from the acid. This allows the omeprazole to pass through the stomach into the intestine where it is absorbed. Losec MUPS tablets are made up of pellets of omeprazole with a similar protective coat. Losec capsules and MUPS tablets must not be chewed, broken or crushed, as this would destroy the special coat, allowing the omeprazole to be broken down in the stomach and making it ineffective.


    Pub Med link:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10451198

    In searching around, what is important to point out to her is that while omeprazole acts to inhibit stomach acid production, it does not act ON the stomach while it is in there. It must be ABSORBED into your system in the small intestine and then works to inhibit the pump in the stomach that makes the acid. If the omeprazole does not have an enteric coating, then the stomach acid itself will break down the active ingredient, rendering it useless. That is why you can't crush up tablets, etc, because it will allow the stomach acid access to the omeprazole itself, and basically negate any potential positive effects.

    Hope this helps. And I'm an MD if it lends any credence to the source during your argument. And I think deltawave is too if memory serves.
    Destiny is not a matter of chance, it is a matter of choice; it is not a thing to be waited for, it is a thing to be achieved. - William Jennings Bryan

    http://www.halcyon-hill.com



  16. #36
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    Well, you could try printing a chapter from a pharmacology textbook, but I sincerely doubt the average person would find it an easy read.

    It's not your job to convince her, but hopefully she realizes it's HER job to do what you ask if it is a matter of administering meds on a vet's orders or empirically.
    Click here before you buy.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #37
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    Jun. 12, 2009
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    481

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    I found a source shat says it must be enteric coated as it is acid-labile. Last paragraph in this link. buschkn, thanks so much for the link and information you provided.

    http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/si.../~8hIDKq:1:ade

    In abstract in this link, it states, "Omeprazole must be protected from intragastric acid when given orally, and is therefore administered as encapsulated enteric-coated granules."

    I think that both of these should be sufficient.

    deltawave, yes, I agree, not my job to convince her, but, she used to be a vet tech and she does enjoy reading studies and scientific evidence on many different subjects. So I figure she might be interested in this. I've known her for years so she shouldn't be offended.
    Last edited by besttwtbever; Mar. 19, 2013 at 01:44 PM. Reason: edited for clarity
    "Be the change you want to see in the world."
    ~Mahatma Gandhi



  18. #38
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    used to be a vet tech
    If that's anything like "used to be a nurse/MA/paramedic" then good luck. IME that background often breeds the worst sort of dogmatics--those who know just enough to be dangerous and talk the talk but who often forget about the "continuing education" part.
    Click here before you buy.



  19. #39
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    Apr. 9, 2007
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    Zone IV/Area III
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    I use compounded, buffered omeprazole from Precision Pharmacy. VERY affordable and works very well. I have tried other compounded omeprazole in the past, and this is far better. I do make sure to store the container in the med room so it is dark and the temp is within normal range.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  20. #40
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    Feb. 8, 2008
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    Delaware Valley
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    Quote Originally Posted by reay6790 View Post
    I use compounded, buffered omeprazole from Precision Pharmacy. VERY affordable and works very well.
    I've use a compounded, buffered version that is also affordable and works well. (I've given the name to anyone who sent me a PM or e-mail). I'm not surprised the one from Precision Pharmacy also works well. You don't need to convince me that omeprazole needs to buffered, but I just don't think you need years of super secret and expensive research to find a buffer that works


    2 members found this post helpful.

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