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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2010
    Posts
    165

    Default Red Eyes

    Hey All!

    What can cause red eyes in a horse?

    Here is the background.

    Just over 2 weeks ago I noticed that my horse's right eye was very red (a groom also noticed it and mentioned it to me) but not swollen and didn't seem to be bothering him. He was in the process of getting clipped so I assumed some hair had gotten in there and irritated it and I decided to watch it. (I have owned this horse for 2.5 years and while his eyes tend to water, they have never been red.)

    Several days later it was still red and I mentioned it to my trainer and asked about possibly getting the vet out. She told me to put clear eyes in it if it was red, and I told her that it wasn't his eye ball that was red, but the inner corner membrane that was red. I felt like she was blowing me off with that comment about the clear eyes.

    I gave it a few more days and by that time BOTH eyes were red and other boarders were coming up to me and asking me what was wrong with my horse I emailed my trainer yesterday and told her that his eyeS were not looking better and it was either time to call the vet or take him to the local equine hospital to see an opthamologist.

    My trainer emailed some pics to our vet (I later found out she only emailed pics of the right eye and only began to treat the right eye) who recommended banamine and antibiotic cream. I was pleased with this treatment plan when I was told via text.

    I arrived at the barn tonight and my trainer asked if I thought his eye looked better. I said the right one maybe looked a little better but not the left. Ugh. You can probably see where this is going. She even told me she didn't have enough cream to treat both eyes but if I wanted she would have the vet order some for him.

    My trainer thinks there is NOTHING wrong with my horse. Tonight she even said to me "his eyes are always watery" to which I responded "I know but they were never red". Obviously she thinks I am over reacting. Am I? She is starting to get defensive so I don't want to push it with her if I am overreacting. Hence I'm on coth to get some input.

    Can a horse's eyes be red but not have any underlying serious issue, infection, or beginnings of a serious issue?

    Thank you for your help!

    ----------------
    here is one of the images our regular vet saw, and according to my trainer, our regular vet was not concerned (so I shouldn't be either, right?)

    http://i1285.photobucket.com/albums/...psd4c2566a.jpg
    Last edited by IvyHall; Mar. 5, 2013 at 09:57 PM. Reason: to add photo



  2. #2

    Default

    Get a vet to see the horse, not just prescribe via a photo.

    If it turns out to be nothing, you're out the cost of a vet call. But if it's uveitis or something else, you may be able to prevent or slow down vision loss.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2010
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    5,975

    Default

    Uveitis doesn't usually have red eyes. I'm wondering if it's allergies. It's bad allergies around here and everyone is sneezing. I notice a lot of the animals are getting runny, red eyes, too.

    Either way, call the vet out yourself. Sounds like your "trainer" is a bit off.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2004
    Posts
    2,676

    Default

    Your trainer is a trainer - NOT a vet! You don't mess around with eyes - call the vet NOW. I would have a serious issue with a vet who makes a diagnosis (or did the vet just prescribe "stuff" without having a clue about what the problem was??) for an eye issue via photographs. The horse needs to be seen in person!
    "When a horse greets you with a nicker & regards you with a large & liquid eye, the question of where you want to be & what you want to do has been answered." CANTER New England



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 28, 2001
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    4,350

    Default

    I've had issues with my horse getting corneal ulcers in the past. I believe it is due to allergies. Anyway, his eyes tend to get red and irritated before he gets an ulcer. In my case, the antibiotic ointment did not help as much as anti-inflammatory eye ointment for the redness and irritation. But in any case, call the vet to see what is going on. Eyes can go bad very fast!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    12,262

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ryansgirl View Post
    Your trainer is a trainer - NOT a vet!
    Exactly.

    It is your horse, you are worried. Call the vet yourself and tell the vet what you are worried about and go from there.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2010
    Posts
    165

    Default

    Contacting our current vet is out of the question. She already saw the pics and was not concerned.

    I am going to contact the large animal hospital today and see about getting him and appointment with an opthamologist.

    I am very concerned that something serious is going on. That the watery eyes, that other vets ignored, was the start of something and now the red eyes is the next stage. I am now also concerned that he has already had some vision loss in the right eye. He ALWAYS stands on the right side of the grooming stall and he gets anxious when there are other horses in the ring with him and when they get close.... I wonder if it is because he cannot see them well. However, he doesn't refuse jumps and isn't terribly spooky.

    Best case senario I get him seen by the opthamologist and I am told there is nothing wrong.

    Second best, he is seen and we catch something fairly early on.

    Now, how to approach my trainer about all this without upsetting her....



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2004
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    2,676

    Default

    Glad you are calling a specialist - it's the right thing to do. I've had regular vets tell me that they aren't great with eyes and have recommended seeing a specialist (which I have done for a nasty corneal ulcer that required a 4-day stay at the equine hospital). Better to be safe than sorry - at least you'll know what is going on. Don't worry about your trainer - you need to do what is best for your horse .
    "When a horse greets you with a nicker & regards you with a large & liquid eye, the question of where you want to be & what you want to do has been answered." CANTER New England



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IvyHall View Post
    Contacting our current vet is out of the question. She already saw the pics and was not concerned.
    I am glad you are calling the specialist but this comment (the way it is worded) makes me scratch my head some.

    Nothing wrong with calling your regular vet and saying "Dobbin's eyes are still much redder than they have ever been, I am concerned can we please schedule a visit". It is hard to believe a vet would refuse because they already saw a photo and prescribed treatment.



  10. #10
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    Jul. 24, 2004
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trubandloki View Post
    I am glad you are calling the specialist but this comment (the way it is worded) makes me scratch my head some.

    Nothing wrong with calling your regular vet and saying "Dobbin's eyes are still much redder than they have ever been, I am concerned can we please schedule a visit". It is hard to believe a vet would refuse because they already saw a photo and prescribed treatment.
    Totally agree. I'm guessing the OP has not talked to the vet and everything was done through the trainer who says the vet is not worried?? Do I have that correct? Any reputable vet would come out since that is their job! Personally if I had talked to the vet and that was the response I got (about not being worried and not wanting to come out) then I'd be searching for a new vet. Thankfully my area is flooded with equine vets so it's easy to find a new one - I realize that is not so easy for others. The OP needs to talk to the vet herself (and not via the trainer).
    "When a horse greets you with a nicker & regards you with a large & liquid eye, the question of where you want to be & what you want to do has been answered." CANTER New England



  11. #11
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    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
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    Default

    Time to take charge of your own horse, OP.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2012
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    1,349

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    I have a pony with some eye problems, and she has been seen by an equine opthamologist at Rood & Riddle... I can't say enough about having your horse seen by an eye specialist- especially if you fear that there may be vision loss. They have great tools, and can really tell sso much. Even if the redness is a no big deal little irritation- you should have a pro look deep into those big eyes and see what they see inside.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2010
    Posts
    165

    Default

    I figured I would update since we finally got to the bottom of my horse's eye issues.

    Our regular vet was still down in FL so a different vet came out and looked at his eyes. My biggest concern, of course, was uveitis. All the structures of his eye looked good and showed no signs of uveitis. Thank goodness!

    Vet said his watery eyes are from clogged tear ducts but that the recent redness was a result of conjunctivitis. He had been on the triple antibiotic eye cream for at least a week and the infection was not totally resolved so she switched him to a different antibiotic and said to call her if the redness was not totally gone within 5 days

    The vet also said we could flush his tear ducts which would temporarily (for how long she couldn't say, one week, two months, who knows) stop the watering eyes. I decided not to have it done at this time as it required sedation and he is supposed to show this weekend. She thought this was the right choice bc since he has never been bothered by the watery eyes its not as if it would provide him with any relief. The vet said it would be mainly to make the people feel better

    So while this turned out to be nothing serious the vet said it was absolutely the right thing to do to have him checked if we suspected uveitis as there are things that can be done to help save the eye/vision with early treatment.



  14. #14
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IvyHall View Post
    So while this turned out to be nothing serious the vet said it was absolutely the right thing to do to have him checked if we suspected uveitis as there are things that can be done to help save the eye/vision with early treatment.
    Absolutely...never screw around with eyes.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



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