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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Clarksdale, MS--the golden buckle on the cotton belt
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    18,979

    Default Leather care question

    Hope this is the correct forum.

    I have an old and cheap Miller Harness bridle that is fifteen or so years old. It was made in India, but the leather was fairly decent until recently. Since I haven't been riding lately, the bridle simply sat in my spare room which is heated and cooled. I pulled it out today and was shocked at how dry it's become. It's really stiff and nasty. The last time I cleaned it, it was also treated with Ko-Cho-line--the red stuff.

    I've just cleaned it and oiled it with Lexol--all but the reins. They are laced, and I've always made it a point to make sure that whatever I'm using gets under all the laces, front and back. But this bridle is so dry that I have a feeling that I'm going to be oiling it several times over the next month and I'm dreading having to work the oil under every single lace.

    Is it okay to just pour a bunch of Lexol into a pan and let all the bridle parts soak overnight?
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2003
    Posts
    4,921

    Default

    I wouldn't soak leather. Instead, I'd use a cream conditioner (I like Effax in the brown tub for reviving any and all manners of leather).

    Cream conditioner should get under the leather pretty well if you just smear it on with a cloth, since it stays where it's put. A liberal coating, leave for overnight, wipe off the excess should do it and you'll only have to do it once.

    I think lexol is pretty useless for reviving dry leather. It's too thin.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    5,549

    Default

    I agree, I do not like to soak leather. I have had success with olive oil on my cheapie leather goods (and often get compliments about my "nice" tack - which is all cheap!)



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Clarksdale, MS--the golden buckle on the cotton belt
    Posts
    18,979

    Default

    My standard for my good leather is Stubben's Hamanol which I was hoping not use because it's so darned expensive and I'm almost out. But with that, I can get a reasonable amount under each lace with a toothpick.

    Guess it's gonna be Hamanol after all. Drat!
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2005
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    525

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vineyridge View Post

    Guess it's gonna be Hamanol after all. Drat!
    If it only didn't smell so awful.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 29, 2012
    Location
    Bahstin, Mass
    Posts
    724

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by otisrider View Post
    If it only didn't smell so awful.
    I think it smells like BBQ, and I kind of like that smell!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    17,273

    Default

    I like Passier Lederbalsam for stuff like this. I'll sit in front of the TV and work it in with my hands. The warmth helps. It smells nice


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2005
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    6,342

    Default

    I would second use of Effax (Leder Combi in the brown jar)- I used it on a cheap leather Mexican headstall I have from the mid-60s that was very dry and brittle (and cheap leather to start with) about 6 months ago. Said headstall has sat unused since then on horn of a saddle in basement and still looks and feels great.

    Having said that- I may be mis-remembering 'which' of the creams I used, I also use Skidmore's leather cream on much of my western tack and like it, too.

    Haven't used Lexol in ages come to think of it.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,446

    Default

    You can't go wrong with Flexalan; though I don't know if it's available in your area.
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 15, 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    303

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Simkie View Post
    I like Passier Lederbalsam for stuff like this. I'll sit in front of the TV and work it in with my hands. The warmth helps. It smells nice
    This is my favorite stuff for conditioning tack. It came highly recommended by a local saddle maker too (who also said a lot of the leather care products on the market do more harm than good!).



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2006
    Location
    At the back of the line
    Posts
    4,016

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Simkie View Post
    I like Passier Lederbalsam for stuff like this. I'll sit in front of the TV and work it in with my hands. The warmth helps. It smells nice


    Not that you can di it now but Ive put a piece of tack in the sunshine just for a minute to warm then rubbed in, seems to help it go in better.
    “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” Peter Drucker



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 3, 2009
    Location
    On the buckle
    Posts
    958

    Default

    If I had that bridle, I would give it a good application of neatsfoot oil, and then another if it soaks up too fast. After waiting overnight, I would apply a nice slick of glycerine bar soap. Use it, clean with a damp cloth and reapply the glycerine soap. If it seems to need somehing more, give some more neatsfoot followed by the glycerine soap. Classic and gives just the results I like, supple with a soft sheen.
    Mon Ogon (Mojo), black/bay 16 H TB Gelding


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2008
    Location
    now in KCMO, and plan to stay there
    Posts
    3,131

    Default

    This wonderful topic reminds me of something I remember from the 1960's and wish I could find it again, perhaps it has a different name now? There was a round jar (white) of a multi-purpose leather cleaner and conditioner, called Thoro-chem. Does anyone remember that stuff? It smelled great!
    Jeanie
    RIP Sasha, best dog ever, pictured shortly before she died, Death either by euthanasia or natural causes is only the end of the animal inhabiting its body; I believe the spirit lives on.



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