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  1. #21
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    Oct. 12, 2001
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    How do you teach him not to scoop up anything that accidentally falls on the ground? Or not to climb on daughter's bed and steal her clothing (other than teach daughter to use hamper-which is a pointless exercise half the time lol) Or not to pounce on cat when it comes to visit? Other than correcting the action when it happens?
    you keep saying NOT TO DO- you have to reverse your thinking. Think instead about what you want him to do in each situation and consider how to go about getting that behavior. Build some tools into the dog's behavior so you can tell the dog what to do in any situation- that's what commands like Sit, Come, Drop it, are FOR, not to boss the dog around, but so you can instruct him what to do in any situation life throws at you.

    So you don't want him to climb on daughter's bed? what that means is you want him to be on the floor. Reward him for being on the floor near the bed- stand there and rapid-fire feed him treats as he remains on the floor until he gets the idea. In another setting, prepare yourself with tools: teach him to jump off things on command, to earn a reward. Then if he hasn't quite got the "chis on the floor get good stuff" concept, at least instead of shrieking NO at him you can TELL HIM WHAT TO DO instead.

    As for not grabbing stuff on the floor, that's basic "self-control" or "leave it" training: you can look that up. Basically, you start off by rewarding the dog for turning away from food or ignoring food. You put food in your closed fist and the dog tries all kinds of things to get you to cough it up, and when the dog looks away or stops trying, that's when you reward. All dogs should be taught "Leave it" or some variant thereof of the concept of ignoring something, it may save your dogs life when he Doesn't Gobble Up the Rat Poison because you calmly instructed him to ignore it. This kind of self-control exercise will also improve your dog's attention span and reduce his hyper behavior- that kind of dog needs lots of work in such things; one basic is insisting he hold a stay and not being allowed to eat his meal until you release him to eat. You don't correct him per se, you just pick up the food if he moves before you release and start again. Start with a microsecond of stay before eating and work upwards from there.

    As to the cat, well, what do you want him to do in that situation instead of jumping on the cat?

    It's nice to have an emergency NO installed, in case, but you should try to only use it in emergencies where you can't think of anything else to do to alter the dog's behavior. If you find yourself saying NO at your dog frequently there is something wrong with your dog's training.



  2. #22
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    Nov. 24, 2006
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    My GSD is two. He knows hand signals for sit, lay down, stay, get it, drop it, leave it, come, speak, stop, drop. He will spit something out at MACH1 speed if I tell him to. I can drop him with a hand signal in the middle of the yard at a dead run. He will stay for his ball to be thrown, to be allowed to eat, to wait to go thru the door. I trained him myself, the NILF way mostly, the training took on him. The chi, it just isn't sinking in....in previous posts, I've mentioned I do have treats to distract, to attempt to teach a drop it and exchange for a yummy treat, to attempt to divert to better behavior for the treat- He. Doesn't. Care. about the treats most of the time. Once in awhile, sure, usually- nope. I've been thru a dozen different treats, hot dogs,cheese, any and all store kinds just about, pieces of lunchmeat....he's just not food motivated at all. I'm going to try that Natural Balance roll, see if there's some magical ingredient he loves in it.
    Just for peace of mind, lol, We're not standing there shrieking at the top of our lungs at the dog constantly, we do have a baby gate up at daughter's door when she's home and he is crated if no one can be on their toes with him. Daughter is 13 and this is her puppy, he can't be contained 24x7.... As bad as he is, I wouldn't want him to be either.
    Kerri



  3. #23
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2009
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    MA
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    kasjordan - ROLF!!!!!
    your dog = my dog! LOL I have a chi cross: 1/2chi, 1/4 yorkie and 1/4 bishon.

    I took Cooper to the dog school down the street where we learned clicker training.
    so he has a few commands...if..I.have.food. otherwise not so much.

    He will not housebreak, I know because my routine has not varied in the year or so I have had him. I suspect he will never housebreak so he lives in his crate when I am not on the computer.

    the minute I get treats, he jumps up and down, up and down! comes when he is called... really nicely. without treats blah. LOL


    I don't have any thoughts except to say I am in your shoes and I feel your pain! LOL



  4. #24
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    May. 23, 2009
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    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
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    Nov. 24, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by HannahsMom7 View Post
    Yours is a little hairball!!!!! Looks bad to me ;-)
    Here is our heathen- You can see the tail wagging constantly.
    http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b2...ps51e9b509.jpg
    Kerri



  6. #26
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    May. 23, 2009
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    Love yours!!!!

    I keep feeling badly bout keeping him in a crate most of the time, but a year ago put him up for adoption on CL.
    I was honest about him not being housebroken. someone wrote to me saying good luck that his girlfriend had a small dog and it never got housebroken and wished me luck! LOL
    that was my only reply.

    oh well, he is cute and LOVES me.



  7. #27
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    Apr. 1, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by HannahsMom7 View Post
    Love yours!!!!

    I keep feeling badly bout keeping him in a crate most of the time, but a year ago put him up for adoption on CL.
    I was honest about him not being housebroken. someone wrote to me saying good luck that his girlfriend had a small dog and it never got housebroken and wished me luck! LOL
    that was my only reply.

    oh well, he is cute and LOVES me.
    srsly? I think he's adorable. I'd take him in a second!



  8. #28
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    Jun. 24, 2005
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    Alabama
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    Housebreaking can be nearly impossible with a dog that didn't have access to the outside regularly with mom and the rest of the litter. And if a dog is from a Pet Store or other place that kept them caged all of the time, then reliable housebreaking is probably never going to happen. With intense supervision, then you might be able to get the message across, and with tiny food treats with every successful outside excursion.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  9. #29
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    Mar. 10, 2007
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    Montana
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    I've found that they house train eventually; it's nice if it happens when they're little but eventually they all learn it, especially if you have older dogs that they learn from. I don't sweat house training too much. My little dog has one "emergency" towel in the utility room if nobody is here to let her out but otherwise she's good and I really did not spend a lot of time on house training. I take them out often and the other dogs don't pee in the house, they catch on. I've had the last three pups that I handled that way and they're all doing great on the house training-it just takes time I guess.



  10. #30
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    May. 23, 2009
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    MA
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    I'd like to believe that Cooper will someday, be housebroken. I doubt it.

    I take him out before he eats and after he eats giving him at least 20 min. And everytime I take him out of his crate, he is taken outside for a chance to pee.

    If I let him out in any other room than the one he is in, he either pees or poops on the floor. He seems to be able to poop at will! LOL

    I have owned him for at least a year. I retired end of Oct. and take him outside all the time. He still has no clue.

    I am resigned, since he is nervous about new people, I am going to keep him. He doesn't have a bad life, Just not what I would have liked.

    oh yes, he will not settle in the other room either. Not even after going to the doggie park and running around. He either sits in my lap at the PC or crashes in his crate. no in between.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    May. 1, 2001
    Location
    Paris, Kentucky
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    Oh my gosh - I can so relate to this! I recently got a Chinese Crested puppy. My other dogs are Scottish Deerhounds and a Greyhound, so the difference is enormous!

    Housebreaking is.... not complete disaster, but certainly not close to 100 percent despite constant viligance. And given his size and hairless state, I've elected to train him to pee-pads in the house - so he has his own bathroom area. It's very aggravating.

    The good news is he is very food motivated, so he's actually better trained (to sit, down, come) than the Deerhounds - lol! But he has horrible seperation anxiety. Fortunately, he can go to work with me most days, but the days he's left at home are horrible for him (and me). :-(

    Anyway, feeling your pain, but completely understand how these little ones wrap us around their little paws. This is my Spinner...

    http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y13...ps248533f0.jpg



  12. #32
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    Oct. 12, 2001
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    He. Doesn't. Care. about the treats
    ok, so what does he care about? he must want or like something. Sometimes you have to be creative- one of my dogs couldn't care less about food, but is wildly in love with tug toys. I must admit that another one's favorite thing was taking a car ride, so yes, our "jackpot" reward in training was hopping into the car and taking a spin around the block.
    Is he prey-driven? try buying a remote-controlled mouse toy (they have these for cats) and when he's good he gets to chase the mousey.
    You said something about him liking to dive onto and play with stuff you drop? that could be a reward.
    Sit down and make a list of "stuff my dog likes". Environmental stuff too- going out the door. Chasing squirrels. Taking walks. Jumping on the bed. Stealing laundry. And try to figure out which you can possibly use as a reward for the dog- you do what I want, I'll let you have what you want.

    I would just warn you again to not try negative-type training with these dogs- punishments and corrections like NO often work ok with working-breed dogs, aka your GSD, but they rarely work at all with non-working breeds. From what you say, I suspect you trained your GSD primarily via corrections. Which is OK for that breed, but not for this dog, which is why it's not working. Time to change tactics.

    If the dog is from a puppy mill, which is likely, he may be very difficult to housebreak, sorry. Also a thought: are you supplementing his diet with fish oil? puppies who grow up with insufficient omega-3's in their diet can end up exhibiting ADD-like symptoms and difficulty learning due to incorrect brain development. He may have had a poor diet before you got him, so you can't really fix that now, but perhaps a bit of supplementation might help.



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