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  1. #1
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    Oct. 3, 2012
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    Default Another sad ending for mustangs.

    This story is just heartbreaking.

    LAS VEGAS -- Federal officials say they have finished rounding up 11 “problem” wild mustangs in northern Nevada and that the horses will now be offered for adoption.
    The last of a band that once numbered 50 mustangs were enticed into a trap last week, as concerned residents of the Carson City neighborhood watched in dismay, questioning why the Bureau of Land Management insisted on removing animals that had peacefully coexisted with surrounding homeowners for years.


    http://www.latimes.com/news/nation/n...,4352968.story


    www.youtube.com/watch?v=eztT_P0UWSY
    A helmet saved my life.

    2015 goal: learn to ride like TheHorseProblem, er, a barn rat!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    Default

    I just read about that. WTF?
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  3. #3
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    Apr. 9, 2005
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    Colorado
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    1,263

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    This story is just heartbreaking.

    LAS VEGAS -- Federal officials say they have finished rounding up 11 “problem” wild mustangs in northern Nevada and that the horses will now be offered for adoption.
    The last of a band that once numbered 50 mustangs were enticed into a trap last week, as concerned residents of the Carson City neighborhood watched in dismay, questioning why the Bureau of Land Management insisted on removing animals that had peacefully coexisted with surrounding homeowners for years.


    http://www.latimes.com/news/nation/n...,4352968.story


    www.youtube.com/watch?v=eztT_P0UWSY




  4. #4
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    Jun. 21, 2009
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    Hunterdon County NJ
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    Default

    Meh... I can see how officials are nervous about people 'nuzzling' with feral horses and the possibility of the horse's causing a traffic accident. If locals wanna keep em wandering around, I say they pay $ into an insurance fund for when some parent with an infant in a car seat hits one and the kid is injured/killed.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2007
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    3,580

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    Quote Originally Posted by Isabeau Z Solace View Post
    Meh... I can see how officials are nervous about people 'nuzzling' with feral horses and the possibility of the horse's causing a traffic accident. If locals wanna keep em wandering around, I say they pay $ into an insurance fund for when some parent with an infant in a car seat hits one and the kid is injured/killed.
    So what about deer.? Suppose we should round them all up too.
    save lives...spay/neuter/geld


    5 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
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    Default

    Deer?

    We manage their numbers with regulated hunting.
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling


    8 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
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    May. 5, 2002
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    Default

    Yes deer get hit by cars too. But deer are not feral animals, these horses are. They need just as much management if not more than wild animals to keep them out competing wild animals.

    Honestly I would rather see them rounded up and placed in a good home, rather than have them get hit by a car and killed or injured. If the people in the neighborhood love these horses so much, maybe they should adopt them and keep them in horse safe facilities.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
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    Feb. 20, 2010
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    People also don't freak out when deer are shot, or removed. Well, maybe some people, but there isn't this "how dare they interfere with the noble, free deer" thing going on.

    That's just the thing. Wild animals can be hunted. These horses shouldn't be compared to wild game to make a point, because if you want them to be treated like deer, would you be ok with a game season for them? I bet they're not filled with bute


    14 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Out for Lent
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coanteen View Post
    People also don't freak out when deer are shot, or removed. Well, maybe some people, but there isn't this "how dare they interfere with the noble, free deer" thing going on.

    That's just the thing. Wild animals can be hunted. These horses shouldn't be compared to wild game to make a point, because if you want them to be treated like deer, would you be ok with a game season for them? I bet they're not filled with bute
    you'll have some nut throw bute out for them to eat, just because!
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
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    Oct. 18, 2000
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    A lawful, regulated hunting season seems more humane than rounding them up and making them live their lives out in a pen. It's certainly something to think about.

    The meat is edible, nutritious, and safe to consume. The hide is useful. The numbers need to come down - though we seem prepared to tolerate the presence of a pretty feral species instead of removing them like we try to do to other ferals.

    If the nature fakers would get over their obsession with the feral horse the herds might actually be managed properly.
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling


    20 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
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    Sep. 21, 2009
    Location
    Queens, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    This story is just heartbreaking.

    LAS VEGAS -- Federal officials say they have finished rounding up 11 “problem” wild mustangs in northern Nevada and that the horses will now be offered for adoption.
    The last of a band that once numbered 50 mustangs were enticed into a trap last week, as concerned residents of the Carson City neighborhood watched in dismay, questioning why the Bureau of Land Management insisted on removing animals that had peacefully coexisted with surrounding homeowners for years.


    http://www.latimes.com/news/nation/n...,4352968.story


    www.youtube.com/watch?v=eztT_P0UWSY
    Yanno, my natural kneejerk is "how sad/what a shame/a little more lost"....but -- having never been there and not being acquainted with all the facts and details beyond this article, and having no special knowledge of feral horse management, I consciously reined in that visceral feeling of sadness.

    I have learned I do not have to have an opinion on things so far outside my wheelhouse, and that indeed, uninformed and reactionary opinions can be detrimental to myself and others.
    Besides, my heart can't take much more breaking
    VP Horse & Carriage Association of NYC

    https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-F...ref=ts&fref=ts


    5 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
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    Jun. 4, 2012
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    Louisa County, Virginia
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    Default

    If it will cheer you up, click on my facebook page, below, and scroll back about 14 posts to last Saturday -- I put up a photo of one of my two BLM mustangs going nicely under saddle with a happy young rider!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    NorthEast
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    24,781

    Default

    Hitting a horse with a vehicle is more like hitting a moose or elk than a deer. A muley is about 1/3 the size/weight of a horse.

    The difference between a deer or horse vs a car is about the same difference as a rottie dog or a deer vs a car. The damage difference is enormous.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte


    5 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
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    May. 5, 2002
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    There was a reality show on a year or so ago about Navajo Reservation Police. One episode showed an incident where a horse was hit by a car on the highway at night. The car was toast, if I remember right the people were okay. They showed the horse, still alive, attempting to get up on the blood soaked pavement..... with a completely shattered leg, dangling by skin and ligaments. It was a brief camera shot of the horse, and I don't know why they felt the need to show the horse floundering around, leg flopping, even for a second. But they did, it was awful. Sorry for the graphic description, but it is the reality of car vs horse. Round them up, and place them in good homes before the horses or humans get killed in a car wreck. Like I said, if the people in the neighborhood love them so much, they should be lined up to adopt them and give them safe homes. Even if they have to board them.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
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    Jan. 28, 2013
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    Southeastern US
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    Default

    All it takes is one idiot. I think removing wild horses is a good idea when people stop treating them like they are wild. It's no different than removing bears or racoons or any other animal that stops acting as if they were wild.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
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    Jan. 26, 2006
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    Fort Worth, Texas
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    Default

    the evasion species is man, but there appears to be resistance to rounding them up for relocation however it could easily be accomplished by using dollar bills as bait

    However with the horses crossing a busy highway, if it were a family member of mine that died in a collision I wouldn't have a second thought about relocation either of myself or of the horses



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by clanter View Post
    the evasion species is man, but there appears to be resistance to rounding them up for relocation however it could easily be accomplished by using dollar bills as bait
    The invasive species is both man and horse, in this case really more horse. Man as a species migrated to NA and became established, but these horses (or their predecessors) were brought over domesticated and went feral.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
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    Jun. 5, 2007
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    New Hampshire
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    Default

    I'm not sad for those mustangs. A feral life is not an easy one and given that they were causing traffic hazards and fighting with domestic horses through fences, etc, they have a greater chance at a better life adopted out as riding horses than they did left feral.

    Heck, if I was one of those folks who enjoyed seeing them out my back door you bet your butt I'd be at that adoption with a few hundred bucks to pick one out for myself!

    Personally, I'm waiting until the 2015 or 2019 Kiger gathers to get mine. I have always wanted one of those guys......looking forward to it.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
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    Oct. 3, 2012
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    The attitudes expressed here surprise me. Please read Mustang by Deanne Stillman if you want to know the true history of the mustang and its place in the building of this country. These horses deserve better than holding pens and slaughter.
    A helmet saved my life.

    2015 goal: learn to ride like TheHorseProblem, er, a barn rat!



  20. #20
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    The attitudes expressed here surprise me. Please read Mustang by Deanne Stillman if you want to know the true history of the mustang and its place in the building of this country. These horses deserve better than holding pens and slaughter.
    Maybe you ought to read what invasive species are, like feral pigs and yes, horses and their negative impact in some regions?

    Here is a book you may find interesting and enlightening.
    It will provide you with some information you seem to be missing about what feral horses are and are not and some of the controversies around them:

    http://www.oregonslivinglegends.com/

    I think you are missing the forest for a few trees there.

    There is a place for feral horses, as designated by laws passed in 1971.
    That is where they are, with the right management, kept as a symbol, not because they are native species needing preserving.

    That is the true story of feral horses, not any other of many flights of fancy someone used for donation drives for the cause of the moment, here "save the wild horses".


    5 members found this post helpful.

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