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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2003
    Location
    IN
    Posts
    4,177

    Default Weed Eating Under Fencing

    I wonder if anyone has suggests for the best way to control weeds under fencing. I've tried traditional weed eaters but they aren't strong enough for these weeks. The tractor and ride on mower won't fit under. Weed killing isn't super effective and just leaves ugly brown dead weeds. If there a really good tool for doing this? Thanks!
    Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Goethe



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 2005
    Location
    ON, Canada
    Posts
    400

    Default

    Sounds like you need a trimmer with a blade attachment instead of the string.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    7,110

    Default

    I have a landscaper model weed wacker, which uses the LARGE string.90. It cuts almost everything less than pen sized trees of wood. Straight shaft trimmers are more powerful, having enough string out to do a cut with, are helpful.

    Unfortunately, the more powerful trimmers are also a bit heavier, may be awkward to use if you are short, so they tire you out. Mine does several miles of fencing each time I need the place trimmed. A real workhorse for me. I have high tensile wire, so the trimmer will go along under the lowest wire easily, though I do trim on both sides to keep weeds away from the hot wires. Good exercise is what I tell myself!

    I do also spray along the bottom under wires, to keep regrowth from happening. I use an electric powered sprayer, which lets me spray steadily instead of stopping to fight with hand sprayer pressure. Yep the weeds are brownish, but THAT is what shows they are dead! I have too much fence to attend to, to worry about a dead weed look. This is a working farm, not a showplace, so I am not busy fussing at tiny details on looks. Much more important to me, to have fences clean of weeds and HOT as fire to prevent horses getting into trouble with fences. Gives us more time to USE the horses, enjoy them, than grooming the grounds and facilities around them.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 16, 2003
    Location
    Guthrie, OK
    Posts
    1,585

    Default

    There are herbicides that prevent weed regrowth. But be careful.
    If the fence is high enough off the ground, how about a simple cheap push mower. Either the rotary type or gas powered.
    Ditto on goodhors's comments about needing a trimmer that uses HEAVY line. And that they are HEAVY timmers.
    We too have high tensile, and pipe (welcome to OK where there is lots of left over used oil well pipe!) fence. The bottom of our fense is high enough that our mower can get under it in most places. For this reason. Then we can go along and just touch up with the string trimmer if need be in the places we want it to look nice.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2003
    Location
    IN
    Posts
    4,177

    Default

    Thanks folks! I should specify that this is mainly for under the fence around the ring. I might have to get a cheap push mower but I'd have to be careful as it is likely to kick up sand. I'll also have to check into the landscaper weedwacker.
    Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Goethe



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2005
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    202

    Default

    I have one of these: http://www.samsclub.com/sams/swisher...mmer/190935.ip

    I bought it from the from the previous farm owner, so I don't know how well it worked brand new. I'd give it a B--it helps quite a bit--and works really well on flat ground and if it has plenty of room to get under the bottom rail. It doesn't get everything if you're going slightly uphill--the spring lets the trimmer drag behind too much--but overall I like it. Saves lots of time and makes things look better--presentable (not perfect).



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2002
    Location
    Northern KY
    Posts
    4,457

    Default the ones with the blades are the way to go

    Weed killer, is not. Because where there are no roots, moles will take advantage and burrow the length of your fences, and the lack of grass will lead to erosion, also not a good thing.

    We have 7000 linear feet of 4 board fence. Ask me how I know? We just weed whack it with the trimmers with the blades. When I say we, I do not mean me, I mean someone else with stronger shoulders than I have.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
    Posts
    5,772

    Default

    Stihl FS110


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 22, 2007
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    809

    Default

    Some weed wackers have the ability to switch the bottom half of the shaft, so you can use the attachment with the blade on it. It's perfect for those horrible tree-trunk weeds, lol! You can also get an attachment that is more like a hedge trimmer, if the blade doesn't work for you. Also, use the Gator Line twine, it's MUCH stronger than the regular red twine. More expensive, but you use so much less, and you can really get after some serious weeds with it.
    "On the back of a horse I felt whole, complete, connected to that vital place in the center of me...and the chaos within me found balance."



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2012
    Posts
    196

    Default

    I have a stihl and a echo, one with heavey duty string and one with a blade (much easier then switching back and forth) both for about 4 years - on trimming days i can be running them for 4 or 5 hours on thick woody weeds. Go to a tractor dealer and buy a trimmer there, they will be designed for heavey use, the ones from home depot etc will overheat and not use heavey enough string for real work.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Location
    Western South Dakota
    Posts
    2,442

    Default

    We have a weed whip on wheels. We got it at Sears. It uses the super heavy, twisted plastic "string" and it cuts very well.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    1,759

    Default

    Most of the big TB farms here in Ocala use chemicals. No problems with erosion because the area is narrow. Personally, I have not had problems with moles because they seem to like my grass much better than the bare fence lines :/



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2004
    Location
    Rixeyville, VA
    Posts
    6,456

    Default

    Mr. IF uses a DR walk behind weed whacker with a blade. However, he does lots of fence line. I chemicals around the ring.

    Funny aside, one morning he starts the week whacker up and the Fjords bolt out of the run-in shed. Were they afraid of the noise? Heck no, they got lined up behind him to catch whatever debris he whacked. They followed him all the way up their fence line.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com


    2 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2000
    Location
    Memphis, TN USA
    Posts
    248

    Default

    All little off, but related. We always mowed so that the grass was thrown into our dry lot ring for the ponies. They lined up to get it and we called it the "salad shooter." Because they were on a dry lot they would get on their knees and eat anything they could get from under the fence line.
    Quote Originally Posted by IronwoodFarm View Post

    Funny aside, one morning he starts the week whacker up and the Fjords bolt out of the run-in shed. Were they afraid of the noise? Heck no, they got lined up behind him to catch whatever debris he whacked. They followed him all the way up their fence line.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
    Posts
    8,403

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cai View Post
    I have one of these: http://www.samsclub.com/sams/swisher...mmer/190935.ip

    I bought it from the from the previous farm owner, so I don't know how well it worked brand new. I'd give it a B--it helps quite a bit--and works really well on flat ground and if it has plenty of room to get under the bottom rail. It doesn't get everything if you're going slightly uphill--the spring lets the trimmer drag behind too much--but overall I like it. Saves lots of time and makes things look better--presentable (not perfect).
    I bought one of these new several years ago. I completely agree with your analysis.

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Sanger, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,811

    Default

    We have one similar to this. It uses a real heavy twisted twine that comes in
    sticks.
    http://www.homedepot.com/p/t/2038229...1v&R=203822955
    Julie
    www.centaurfencing.com
    Safer, Stronger, Lasts Longer!
    Godspeed BARBARO--Run fast and free!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2002
    Location
    Charlotte CH, VA, USA
    Posts
    126

    Default

    I also have a swisher walk-behind trimmer. It is heavy to push but cuts through anything.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2003
    Location
    IN
    Posts
    4,177

    Default

    Thanks everyone! I'll be visiting some places locally to look at options in person.
    Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Goethe



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2010
    Posts
    2,151

    Default

    +1 for the fs110. It's quite possibly the best tool in the tool room.
    Nudging "Almost Heaven" a little closer still...
    http://www.wvhorsetrainer.com



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2013
    Posts
    43

    Default

    I have a couple miles of white PVC fence. My property is very hilly and uneven, i have a very tough time with heavy equipment, especially along most of my fencelines.

    90% of it i weed/edge with a handheld string trimmer -- it's a Toro, i use two strands of heavy duty string, and it's a beast.

    The other 10% -- I have a DR Field and brush mower that I use for the remaining parts of the PVC fence where the fence has ground clearance to get the DR mower underneath of it.

    For my electric high-tensile fencing, I use the DR mower.

    I actually have one of the older DR Trimmer/Mowers but it runs like crap and I have never had good luck with it. Maybe I'll overhaul it and give it another try.



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