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  1. #41
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    Jul. 14, 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReSomething View Post
    Reminds me of this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_uQOchrK7NA . Maybe the hot Grand Prix dressage horse didn't mind dawdling his way back to breakfast carrying his handler.

    Ah, but the accidents waiting to happen!
    "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller



  2. #42
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    Jan. 8, 2013
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    If it was me, and I had searched high and low and established that my boarding options were this barn or the one 45+ minutes away, I would try working out a solution with the BO. Personally, I don't think 12+ hrs/day of turnout for your horse is reasonable to expect when no other horses are going out. As I understand it, the BO said "no" to pasture board, not to the horse going out. So... Here's a couple of ideas:

    1.) Why aren't horses turned out outside over the winter? Fear of injury caused by icy patches? Preservation of pastures? If it's the former, you can always offer to sign a special liability release acknowledging dangers of turnout and particularly winter turnout and clearing BO of any responsibility for injuries to your horse. If it's the 2nd reason... you need to find a different barn. I was in a similar situation at a "perfect barn except no horses were out" Despite polite discussions prior to moving my horse there and then several inquiries as to why my horse was not going out, it never really got any better. I finally started asking about turning him out myself and was ultimately told "no".

    If it's the first reason, reframe the question: Is there a paddock that horsie could go out in during the day between feeding times? (when people are already there and could do the turnout). This may get horsie 8 hours instead of the 12 you wanted, but it may be enough to satisfy you both. During the day, presumedly there would be at least a few people coming and going who could "keep an eye" on horsie, thus making the BO possibly more comfortable with him being out.

    3.) If you get the impression that it's more of a labor/lazy/walking issue, ask about turning him out yourself. Is it okay if you let him out before you head off to work and then bring him back in in the evenings? Maybe the BO/staff could put him out in the mornings and you could bring him in?

    Also, as an earlier poster said, have you looking into whether the 45 min away barns are actually turning out?


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  3. #43
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2007
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    Andover, MA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eclectic Horseman View Post
    It's the walking. That's what the BO and/or staff don't want to do. It is very time consuming and exhausting to walk horses out to paddocks and back, particularly if they have individual turnout paddocks. It becomes a full time job if there are more horses than there are paddocks and the horses need to be rotated throughout the day--or if the paddocks are far from the barn.

    No one admits it. It is always "for the sake of the horses" but the walking is really what the issue is. If a barn is not COMMITTED to making sure that horses get turned out, then any excuse not to do it, and the horses will be in their stalls.
    I would pass on a place like this as others have said--the horse WILL be in his stall most of the time.
    That is pretty much what I was going to say. Turnout requires labor, which is expensive. Of course, that doesn't mean horses shouldn't be turned out!

    It took a bit of kicking and screaming on my part to get my BO to leave my horse out for 6 hours rather than the usual 3 hours (there aren't enough paddocks so horses get rotated mid-day, and there is no regular late afternoon staff so they have to come in when the staff are ready to feed them.) And compared to a lot of places, my BO is comparatively GOOD about turnout. At least they go out no matter what the weather, unless it's very icy.
    You have to have experiences to gain experience.

    Proudly owned by Mythic Feronia, 1998 Morgan mare; G-dspeed Trump & Minnie; welcome 2014 Morgan filly MtnTop FlyWithMeJosephine



  4. #44
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    Aug. 25, 2005
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    Northeast
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    Another negative besides the horse's welfare. My experience with horses turned out tin the indoor is that the footing goes rapidly to pot holes and worse. It makes them depressingly dangerous to ride in.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.


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  5. #45
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    If "labor" is the issue and you really live just 5 minutes away, offer to turn out in the AM and bring in in the PM. You may find someone else who'd like their horse turned out, too, and that may solve the "horse out all by itself" scenario.

    To spare myself 90 minutes of driving a day I'd be willing to make some compromises!
    Click here before you buy.



  6. #46
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    Apr. 13, 2008
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    NY
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    I definitely think its a labor issue. I've worked in several boarding facilities myself and when it comes down to it, I think the BM doesn't want to be there all day and the BO travels often. There are six, six pastures. Bigger than two acres each. No water tubs in any of them. I think the issue they have is they don't want to risk extra help (as there is only one person working there now, and it's the BM) and I also think from what I've heard the BO is a big time hunter that believes horses don't belong outside unattended. The reason I wanted to see if she's willing to make an exception is because she is not there often and it's close enough that I could do some of the work.

    Every other place I've been to locally is the same way: either they want the horse to be part of a riding program (which I will absolutely be inflexible about: hell to the NO) or they want it to be limited time outside. For the record the horse can't be stabled for long periods due to his stifle. That is not a thing I am willing to be flexible about. It seems it is either 45 minutes away or it's local ad doesn't offer full turn out. I'm not lookin for cheap pasture board, I'm looking for my horse to have a stall that he never has to be in. My only prerequisite is that the horse be out 24:7 or something very generously similar.

    But, I had the feeling it wouldn't be a good option and hearing people's feedback definitely makes me think I should listen and find something else. I would have loved to be able to come am to turn ou and PM to turn in but when I suggested that the BO was very firm on it being no because he would be alone most of the day.
    AETERNUM VALE, INVICTUS - 7/10/2012



  7. #47
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    Apr. 6, 2006
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    Plainview, MN
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    12+ hours or turnout? Daily? I don't know of any boarding barns that do that as routine, year round. At most places horses get turned out in the morning after feeding, before stall cleaning, and brought back in in the afternoon before the help goes home for the day. So if the help starts at 7 am and works until 4 pm (or somewhere there abouts is pretty typical) the horses will typically be out for 5-7 hours depending on how big the place is and how long it takes to get all the chores done. At some places were there are not enough paddcoks for all the horses they may get switched at lunch time and horses may only get about 3 hours of turn out a day.

    Some places may have the facilities and feel comfortable leaving horses out overnight (especially in the summer), and you would probably fund that more common in the south.

    I am afraid you will not find any barn where you can keep a horse on stall board and have staff turn you horse out at 8 am and bring it in at 8 pm, or if you do you will probably have to pay extra. A better arrangement if you really feel that your horse needs that much turnout would be to find a place to board where your horse has a paddock or small pasture and a run-in shed or stall it can run in/out of, which will be hard to find.

    But moving to a boarding barn and expecting them to change the way they operate for what you think you need is not reasonable and is guaranteed not to work out. Keep looking.


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  8. #48
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    Dec. 18, 2006
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    NY
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    In my area I feel that there is often something missing from every barn - either they have great facilities but no trainer, or a good trainer but no turnout, or great pastures but no indoor.

    I think you have to figure out what you can let go, and then see what will work. I keep my horses at home, no indoor. So in the winter I just don't ride. I'm totally ok with that, because it's not really that fun to ride when it's only 20F outside. We don't compete or even care about riding in the winter, so it's easy for me to let that go. In return, my horses have 24/7 turnout 365 days a year; in summer it includes about 12/12 on pasture but depends on the horse and whether they can tolerate 12 hours of grass.

    I would rather take the winter off than give up turnout. Look around in your area and see if there are barns that allow ship ins, or have a relationship with a barn that has an indoor - it's possible, but might require some legwork. There is a Facebook group in my area for all things horse related - maybe something like that for your area will allow you to find out about private situations that you wouldn't find in the phone book.



  9. #49
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    Sep. 5, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renae View Post
    12+ hours or turnout? Daily? I don't know of any boarding barns that do that as routine, year round. At most places horses get turned out in the morning after feeding, before stall cleaning, and brought back in in the afternoon before the help goes home for the day. So if the help starts at 7 am and works until 4 pm (or somewhere there abouts is pretty typical) the horses will typically be out for 5-7 hours depending on how big the place is and how long it takes to get all the chores done. At some places were there are not enough paddcoks for all the horses they may get switched at lunch time and horses may only get about 3 hours of turn out a day.

    Some places may have the facilities and feel comfortable leaving horses out overnight (especially in the summer), and you would probably fund that more common in the south.

    I am afraid you will not find any barn where you can keep a horse on stall board and have staff turn you horse out at 8 am and bring it in at 8 pm, or if you do you will probably have to pay extra. A better arrangement if you really feel that your horse needs that much turnout would be to find a place to board where your horse has a paddock or small pasture and a run-in shed or stall it can run in/out of, which will be hard to find.

    But moving to a boarding barn and expecting them to change the way they operate for what you think you need is not reasonable and is guaranteed not to work out. Keep looking.
    You not knowing of any barns that provide 12+ hours of turnout daily doesn't mean they don't exist. Before I bought my own farm I boarded at quite a few places that preferred as much turnout as possible. Not only felt it was healthier for the horses, but it also saved them $$$ in stall cleaning & bedding.

    I think you'd be VERY surprised at how many boarding places prefer more turnout to less.



  10. #50
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    West Coast of Michigan
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    More turnout means a lot less stall cleaning! Yes, many barns (including the one where I now board during the winter) do a "turnout after breakfast, come in before supper" schedule from December through March but that is fine with me--they get the oppposite for about 9 months of the year, (in during the day, out at night, close to 16 hours outside/day) or they are out 24/7. It is fine for my current bunch. If a horse MUST be out 24/7 I have the option to bring them home to my barn, where it's all outside, all the time.

    I like for horses to at least remember what it's like to be in a stall, since they travel and show and stay in stalls during those times.

    The older I get, the more I deeply appreciate going to the barn in mid-February after work and finding my horse inside.
    Click here before you buy.


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  11. #51
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    Mar. 23, 2006
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    672

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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Yes, many barns (including the one where I now board during the winter) do a "turnout after breakfast, come in before supper" schedule from December through March but that is fine with me--they get the oppposite for about 9 months of the year, (in during the day, out at night, close to 16 hours outside/day) or they are out 24/7.
    Likewise here. They don't go out for 12 hours during the winter (it would be pitch black to turn out and turn in). They go out after breakfast (8 am ish) until it is time to come in (3 ish). If the weather is yucky (too much snow or too much wind) they're at the gate stomping to come in by 2!

    Summer is a different story - big fields, lots of grass and overnight turnout. Then they are happy to stay out from 7 pm until 8 am.



  12. #52
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    Dec. 27, 1999
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    Midland, NC, USA
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    Our horses are in 12, out 12. Approximately. It is not that uncommon in situations with on-site, hands-on BOs (or on-site staff). Personally I would not board at a barn where hourly help came in the morning to feed, did chores, fed dinner mid afternoon and then left the horses completely unattended for 15 or 16 hours. yikes.

    Jennifer



  13. #53
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    Jun. 20, 2012
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    Living on site does not mean you go grab horses at night.

    The place where I board has 4 grooms on site, and its a small yard - approximately 20 sports horses plus the broodmares and foals. However, they do have working hours and they leave at 6h, by which time the boarders can choose to stay but must do everything themselves. I would NEVER ask one of the grooms to stay after hours to go get my horse from turn out - and I actually think that would be extremely rude. I can choose to keep her out, but then I must go through mud and water, in the middle of the night to pick her up... so I choose not to. Lazy b***, I know. But hey, I don't think my horse minds being in for an hour more, and I sure as hell mind turning her in in those conditions.



  14. #54
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    Apr. 13, 2008
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    NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    You not knowing of any barns that provide 12+ hours of turnout daily doesn't mean they don't exist. Before I bought my own farm I boarded at quite a few places that preferred as much turnout as possible. Not only felt it was healthier for the horses, but it also saved them $$$ in stall cleaning & bedding.

    I think you'd be VERY surprised at how many boarding places prefer more turnout to less.
    See, it's the opposite for me and id have to agree - just because you havent seem them doesnt mean they dont exist. I've worked at two very well known Olympic rider's places as a working student - and both had their horses out 24-7 or out for lengthy periods. For me it's shocking to find people prefer otherwise, as from both a staff and owner standpoint I would prefer horses outside over inside mucking up stalls. NY is not very different climate wise from VT or MA, and both those places I have had my horse housed outside extensively. Was just wondering if this was the norm in NY?
    AETERNUM VALE, INVICTUS - 7/10/2012



  15. #55
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    Jul. 19, 2003
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    Middleburg, VA
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    My horses are out for about 8 hours this time of year (8 til 4). I am solely responsible for turn out/in (we average 12 stalled horses). I am on site, but I am certainly not bringing horses in at 8 at night. Just not happening. I love my job, but there is such thing as work-life balance, and at 8pm I like to be winding down, spending time with friends. I do split night check with the BO, so the horses aren't left completely alone all night, and I am usually in the barn until or 6.

    Summer (actually, sometime in March until November) is a completely different story and they often are out 12+ hours over night.

    Again, every barn will be different, and while flexibility is good, a boarder does have to fit in to some degree. A horse who needed closer to 24/7 turn out would not fit in my barn.



  16. #56
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    Jul. 14, 2003
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    MA
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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    More turnout means a lot less stall cleaning!
    Picking out paddocks is labor intensive, too. More so if you leave it until mud season, which weather can force you to do.
    "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller



  17. #57
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    Apr. 28, 2004
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    Saratoga Springs, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by beowulf View Post
    NY is not very different climate wise from VT or MA, and both those places I have had my horse housed outside extensively. Was just wondering if this was the norm in NY?
    Hardly. My guys live out 24/7, all year long.
    Different Times Equestrian Ventures at Hidden Spring Ranch
    www.DifferentTimesEquestrianVentures.com



  18. #58
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    Dec. 18, 2006
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    NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by beowulf View Post
    NY is not very different climate wise from VT or MA, and both those places I have had my horse housed outside extensively. Was just wondering if this was the norm in NY?
    Quote Originally Posted by Timex View Post
    Hardly. My guys live out 24/7, all year long.
    Mine too, but I keep them at home. I don't know of many boarding barns in my area that turn the horses out all day or all night, and know of several that don't turnout much (or at all). I agree with those that say it's related to the amount of staff/help to move horses in and out. I also think that a lot of barns that ride all winter don't want horses out without traction control, but don't want traction control because they are being ridden indoors. So, horses don't go out.



  19. #59
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    Mar. 9, 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by merrygoround View Post
    Another negative besides the horse's welfare. My experience with horses turned out tin the indoor is that the footing goes rapidly to pot holes and worse. It makes them depressingly dangerous to ride in.
    Not to mention that the air quality is probably pretty poor.
    "You can't blame other people. You can't always say what happened wasn't my fault, and you know what? Even if you have an excuse, shut up. "Bruce Davidson Sr.



  20. #60
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    Jan. 16, 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eclectic Horseman View Post
    Picking out paddocks is labor intensive, too. More so if you leave it until mud season, which weather can force you to do.
    Sadly, I have never been at a boarding barn that is vigilant about paddock picking. Mine get done EVERY DAY, as long as there's daylight and no snow cover. Which of course means "not bloody often" in November, December, and January. But the first warm day of spring . . . yeah, that's poop exodus time.
    Click here before you buy.


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