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  1. #21
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    PSA: The pony might not be such a "seeing eye dog over fences" or a packer for anyone when he gets some groceries and care.

    If I needed this type of pony, and knowing that he's at least 19 years old, I'd want to see him in good weight first. You have to answer questions about his rideability when he's not starving and what it takes to keep him healthy. Both determine his actual value. As it stands now, it would be hard for any buyer of this type of animal to know what they were getting.
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  2. #22
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    I can't go into details, but pony has always been a "harder" keeper to stay in show condition, and as of 2 months ago, his backbone didn't stick out at all - he was pretty round all over. He was about a 4.5-5 body score. Yes, he is a true 19 years old and teeth are in good condition. He doesn't go around with his head "way up", just needs some polish for the hack classes because he has been with a beginner the past two years. I have no control over the situation what so ever, but I was asked where I would price him. Honestly, I do not think he is getting fed the way he needs to, but like I said, I have no say in the matter. I don't even know if he will be sold, I was just asked to suggest a price. This past summer, he was showing and winning in good company in the 2' division, but would need a tune-up right now to go back into the show ring. As far as I know, he doesn't get any supplements or injections and is barefoot. He does not get at all "hot" even when feed properly to maintain a good weight.



  3. #23
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    as of 2 months ago, his backbone didn't stick out at all - he was pretty round all over.
    With rapid weight loss (unless you can show a sustained food shortage) I'd suspect something metabolic, or even cancer.
    If the owner wants a higher price (than what's suggested here) then they need to invest in returning pony to good body score & showability, a thorough health check (with blood chemistry tests) to rule out metabolic issues would also make a difference.



  4. #24
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    Dec. 18, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarabeth View Post
    Loss of topline and a ribby appearance is also a classic symptom of Cushings. The pony is 19, I'd be worried about that.
    My thoughts exactly. Having just taken on a Cushings pony, I would not pay to bring this pony into my barn. Maybe free to good home, or very possibly something low to get it out of trouble. With a vet workup and treatment for metabolic and/or ulcers or teeth, possible special diet - you may end up with an awesome kids pony for another decade. But...you may also end up with a difficult to maintain, laminitic special needs case....

    So, I'd say $0-$500 unless the owner wants to do some of the upfront vet work to rule out Cushings...



  5. #25
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    Feb. 22, 2012
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    Nice job Rabicon ! All your horses look fantastic.



  6. #26
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    Jun. 17, 2001
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    Having been in a BIG Pony barn for almost 18 years that also deals on the local level, it is difficult if not impossible to sell something like this in good weight with a recent SS record.

    Now, people will lease a 19 year old but few would buy one. Especially one that won't hold weight over a 4/5 and is currently a 2/3.

    Have they pulled blood recently to determine why the sudden drop in condition? And even if he is really 19, that geriatric change in appearance can occur around then in some and once the ribs drop, they don't really come back although more weight helps camoflage it. But once they start looking old, they look old.

    I just don't see alot of value here for a buyer with so many others out there for sale or lease plus the cost of the PPE and bloodwork indicated by his current condition would probably be more then his purchase price.

    I'll go ahead and mention the ulcers too...they wouldn't be helping him even if they are not the sole cause of his drop in condition. If the owners would care to invest in bloodwork, treat for ulcers and get him into decent shape (I'm thinking 7ish on that body scale)? They might have a shot at getting 1200 or so or leasing him out. As he is? No.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.


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  7. #27
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    Oct. 10, 2007
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    Thanks. I try very hard to keep all mine in good health and on the right track.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  8. #28
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    For some reason, when I am pony shopping I can never find a seeing eye dog, sound, aged pony (even one how needs some tlc, groceries and a bit of reschooling) for anything less than several thousand dollars

    I guess the reason for the low body score is going to be the deciding factor. If there is something major going on (i.e. Cushings) then yes, he is probably a free lease. If he just is one of those harder keeper types that needed more tlc and is indeed as reliable as you state I think you can still get in the ball park of $1,500. Closer to $3,000 if he was brought back into condition.
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    For some reason, when I am pony shopping I can never find a seeing eye dog, sound, aged pony (even one how needs some tlc, groceries and a bit of reschooling) for anything less than several thousand dollars

    .
    I totally agree. If you can find one for sale at all. There are plenty of little devil-ponies around for free, but not ponies I'd actually put my kid on.



  10. #30
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    Dec. 18, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    I guess the reason for the low body score is going to be the deciding factor. If there is something major going on (i.e. Cushings) then yes, he is probably a free lease. If he just is one of those harder keeper types that needed more tlc and is indeed as reliable as you state I think you can still get in the ball park of $1,500. Closer to $3,000 if he was brought back into condition.
    I agree with you. *In theory* 19 is not that old for a pony. If the pony was in good weight and seemed generally happy and healthy, I would not be surprised to see it go for $2500+ or even way more, if it is truly a safe, sound kids pony.

    At that age, though, health/soundness is everything. If I knew the pony and were convinced it was just an issues with groceries, I *might* take a gamble....



  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    At that age, though, health/soundness is everything. If I knew the pony and were convinced it was just an issues with groceries, I *might* take a gamble....
    But how much would you pay in as is condition? This was a ball park price range question. I don't hate the Pony, I just don't think anybody will pay much of anything for it without considerable assurances it is actually healthy, like bloodwork.

    They get that done, get some groceries into him and school him up a little, it might be different. But the trick is to find somebody who actually will hitch up and come get him-that can be the tough part with a 19 year old 2'er. Alot may like him but most are not going show up with their trailer, load him up and take him home.

    Maybe somebody with their own property who can give it a forever home but todays buyer typically boards out and can't see too many trainers picking this one up as is for a client.
    Last edited by findeight; Mar. 5, 2013 at 02:22 PM.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by findeight View Post
    But how much would you pay in as is condition? This was a ball park price range question.
    Me? Nothing. I already posted above that I would be concerned about Cushings or other metabolic issues as the cause of the poor condition, rather than just lack of groceries.

    I recently took in a "free pony that needed a grass-free environment" as a dry-lot companion to a mini, and have since spent thousands in vet and farrier bills already because he was diagnosed with Cushings about 2 weeks later. Now appears to also be insulin resistant, making even eating regular hay with my herd a huge PITA. On the outside he didn't *look* too bad - a bit ribby, prominent backbone - but they were just signs of a serious metabolic condition. I could see this being the exact same situation.

    So, I agree that *IF* the pony was only a little underweight, he might be worth some decent money. (And if, for example, someone had known him for years and knew that he had been safe, sound and healthy, the seller might get lucky.) But, to the outside market...the current condition is a big red flag unless they want to do some basic vet work first to show he is healthy/sound.



  13. #33
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    I didn't think of Cushings :sad: I try to avoid thinking about it.

    But I agree. After losing Aisha, who had NO SYMPTOMS of Cushings at all whatsoever, I would be hard pressed to take one now. And my vet said that that a good percentage of horses who have it, I can't remember what number he used, maybe 30?, it was all a blurry white noise nightmare, have none of the classic symptoms (rough coat, poor body condition, patchy fat, abscesses, etc etc etc) and the only symptom you get is sudden and severe laminitis. So no, I'd not take one until that was ruled out.

    Even so, if it wasn't Cushings, I stand by my original price estimates. A lesson pony up here, sound and no Cushings natch', would go for that.
    Aisha, my heart from 03/06/1986 to 08/22/2008.

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  14. #34
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    Jun. 11, 2006
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    This was said pony last March.


    http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?s...type=3&theater

    That is me riding him, so I don't mind posting the pics. He can easily do more than 2' (if he was in better condition) but the kid that has been riding him is not at that level yet. He has done the regular larges and was schooling 3' courses just a few months ago (but he was in much better condition than he is now). He was in about this condition in the picture until he left our farm towards the end of December 2012 (less than 3 months ago). I'm not saying it's not a "medical" condition, but I doubt he is on the same routine he was when he was here. He was skinny when he came to our farm when he was purchased and it took several months to get him where he needed to be, so he does have a history of being a harder keeper. How much does being a hard keeper affect pricing? I know buyers don't "want" to purchase a hard keeper, but if the pony can pack around a beginner and just needs a little extra TLC, how badly does that affect price? I honestly don't think that they are going to end up selling him at all, but I was asked the question and for once, I didn't know the answer! Lol I honestly figured around $500, because not many people can see past the ribs and the backbone. BTW, he won the model class at the County Fair this past August (not that it matters, but he was in lovely condition at that time and looked like he was maybe 8 or 9 years old; not closer to 20.



  15. #35
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    Apr. 28, 2008
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    He's super-cute carrying good weight.

    If the pony looks good at time of purchase and you supply me with a list of instructions of what is working to keep him that way, I don't care about a hard keeper. In fact, it is less frustrating for me than my super-easy-keeper pony who lives on air and still is overweight.

    The kicker here is that the pony looks like crap now and no one is just going to take owner's word for it that the pony is OK. The pony is worth nothing/very little in its current condition no matter how desirable it is well-fed.

    If it was a former pony of mine I would be having the "concerned former owner" talk about what its program is and why it has lost so much weight in 3 months. They might need help managing it/getting it on a better program. But while I usually keep my opinions to myself, when it comes to one of my former horses I can't see sitting to the side when you know what it actually took to get pony looking good.

    Then I would never, ever sell these people another horse!


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  16. #36
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    Apr. 21, 2010
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    They should just give him away as is, if they can. The amount of feed they'd have to sink in him, not to mention time, and tuning, will be a wash.

    Sounds like he needs individual care, with a private person who can watch him closely and give one on one attention.



  17. #37
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    Oct. 10, 2007
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    S1969 check out this stuff
    http://www.equinemedsurg.com/faqir.html

    I started out pony that we believe is insulin rest. On it and he is on grass and hay and has lost 100lbs being on a round bale actually and grass 24/7 if the weather is good. Of course he needed to lose weight though and not gain.
    Last edited by rabicon; Mar. 6, 2013 at 10:21 AM.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  18. #38
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    Jul. 25, 2003
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    $500 -- enough to keep him from being sold on to the auctions. Free lease would be better.
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
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  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by fordtraktor View Post
    If it was a former pony of mine I would be having the "concerned former owner" talk about what its program is and why it has lost so much weight in 3 months. They might need help managing it/getting it on a better program. But while I usually keep my opinions to myself, when it comes to one of my former horses I can't see sitting to the side when you know what it actually took to get pony looking good.
    I once got fired from a barn for going off on the BO because they were under feeding a pony I'd sold them. The BO's husband asked why the pony was suddenly snatching grass and pulling the reins out of beginners hands. In retrospect, telling him in a loud voice, "WELL MAYBE IF YOU FED HER she wouldn't feel the need to! You're not supposed to see her SPINE." Fortunately they sold her shortly afterwards and turned into her butterball self again.
    ~Kryswyn~ Always look on the bright side of life, de doo, de doo de doo de doo
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  20. #40
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    I could get a better looking pony for less than $400 at either Camelot or AC4H. Would it come with the rideability of Tyler? Possibly not, it's the chance you take at an auction. But no way would I pay more than $500 and that would be just to convince them they were getting something for their pony and I would be grateful to pay it and consider it a rescue.
    ~Kryswyn~ Always look on the bright side of life, de doo, de doo de doo de doo
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