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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2010
    Posts
    468

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    I used to ride a wide Qh/arab cross that I was training for a friend. He was 14.1 or 14.2 and I'm 5'6 and fit him easily-- didn't look too big on him at all. He started out as more of a pony mover, but as time went on and he relaxed, he started to lengthen a bit. My friend got him free, and while he was definitely not AA material, he ended up being a great little packer. So, while I haven't seen this one, it sounds like you really want to go for it



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb. 12, 2009
    Location
    Central Virginia
    Posts
    186

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    My first trainer had a very cute 14.3 hand Welsh/TB/QH/Arab gelding with a big stride- he was awesome for us kids as well as the smaller adults. My trainer hunted him as well (she was 5'6") with no trouble. He was stocky, but not super wide.
    Juliette Beauchamp, LVT
    http://turtlemountainfarm.com/



  3. #23
    Join Date
    May. 9, 2001
    Posts
    2,508

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    My trainer friend just asked me to find her leads on a good lesson horse in the 14.3-15.1 range. She wants something that can be ridden by most students, and this size works well for nearly all riders.

    My favorite lesson horse was a 15.1 gelding, thought to be a Morgan x Percheron, but could have just as easily had QH in him. I LOVED that horse, wish I had a clone of him.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2007
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    1,873

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    My old barn had a 15.1hh TBxPercheron that they put into the lesson program when he was on the young end of five. At first he had the more advanced riders on him but he was so steady that within about two years he was giving adult beginner lessons. And with that Perch in him, he's pretty sturdy and can handle the heavier adults.
    "Things turn out best for the people who make the best of the way things turn out." ~John Wooden

    Phoenix Animal Rescue



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2013
    Posts
    257

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    Thank you, you lovely bunch of enablers, I told the owners I would take him. Excited to work with a new one, and will update on his progress!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    972

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    Quote Originally Posted by eastendjumper View Post
    Thank you, you lovely bunch of enablers, I told the owners I would take him. Excited to work with a new one, and will update on his progress!
    That's great!! Good luck with him, don't forget to share some photos!!



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2005
    Location
    Va
    Posts
    3,810

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    I think especially for beginner riders or older newbie's smaller makes them feel much more secure. If he seems to have all the other ingredients that you are looking for priced at a negotiable $300, I would give it a go. If he doesn't pan out after some tuning up, sell him.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2009
    Posts
    6,998

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    Quote Originally Posted by eastendjumper View Post
    Thank you, you lovely bunch of enablers, I told the owners I would take him. Excited to work with a new one, and will update on his progress!
    You realize you've just signed up for photos & video ... maybe even his own blog! (a good opportunity for your working student )


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    between the mountains and the sea, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,936

    Default

    Keeping a training blog of her first finishing project would be a great way for you and your working student to track horses progress.

    Good for you! At $300 the worst that can happen is he becomes a resell project.
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    13,234

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    Glad you are getting him.

    Closer to the ground is better when you are a newbie rider.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2003
    Location
    Kansas City, KS
    Posts
    274

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    I am no newbie rider but LOVE the smaller horses that I fit on. At only 5'3 that isn't hard, but I find a hard time getting my legs around ponies that are fit. Morgans are a great breed too! Let us know how he works for you



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jan. 8, 2013
    Posts
    166

    Default

    Pictures please!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2010
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
    Posts
    230

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    At my barn the two of the favorite lesson horses for adults are 14.2 and 14.1--a Haflinger and a welsh cob, respectively. I am a little biased because these are mine, although I am not the BO and several trainers other than me use them for adults, by rider's choice. I think they are chosen by a lot of adults because they are super-cute, gems on the ground, and great confidence-builders (not that there isn't some evil pony that leaks out at times). They do have nice gaits. In fact, folks come from other barns to use the Haflinger mare for her infamous relentlessly rhythmic big trot to learn to post. And, at the end of the day, you can't ask students to ride bareback or without stirrups on just any old horse--it takes a special horse and a certain level of confident/comfort on the part of the rider. But you can on these guys. Hey, I, too, like to sneak in a low jump school bareback on one of these when I can. I need the training for my body, but I'm not quite brave enough to go bareback on my big green beans.
    At all times, we are either training or untraining.
    Flying Haflinger blog: http://flyinghaflinger.blogspot.com/ Flying Irish Draught blog: http://flyingirishredhead.blogspot.com/



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2011
    Location
    WNC
    Posts
    885

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    Looking forward to the photos... And if for some reason he doesn't work out long term as a lesson horse, he could have a great future as a well-broke, all-around competitive trail horse. The trail-riding demographics skew older and a well-trained smallish horse could easily find a home with some old lady who will give him the best of care and keep him forever. Ask me how I know!
    It's just grass and water till it hits the ground.



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