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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2010
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    19

    Default Ethics and the gifted horse

    A few years back, I was given a horse by a BO who wanted to downsize. I'd been leasing him and had intended to purchase him when/if I could scrape together a fair purchase price. When I started leasing him, he had largely been a pasture ornament for years. By the time he was gifted, he was showing (local/non-rated) and on his way to being a solid good citizen thanks to $$$ in training costs borne solely by me.

    Fast forward, and I'm now in a position where I need to move him to his next home. Am I ethically obligated to offer the former BO first right of refusal? This was never discussed to the best of my memory.

    I realize there is minimal detail here. I'm not sure what is pertinent or not, but I'm sure y'all can help with that.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2004
    Location
    South Park
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    3,471

    Default

    Do you own the horse? ie: bill of sale etc?
    If you do and there was never any talk of first refusal, I wouldn't worry about it.
    Follow my journey to the Extreme Mustang Makeover 2015 at www.wildtofab.weebly.com


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2010
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    19

    Default

    Yes, I have a bill of sale.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2004
    Location
    Catonsville, MD
    Posts
    6,922

    Default

    YOu don't owe anyone anything.
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09




  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Out for Lent
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    34,227

    Default

    you don't owe, but it's a nice gesture.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2005
    Location
    Australasia
    Posts
    1,272

    Default

    Ooops, I don't know how to use the edit feature ...
    where am I, what day is it, am I still having a good time?



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2005
    Location
    Australasia
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    Default

    You don't have any obligation to them but if it is a home you'd be happy he went back to it might be a good place to start
    where am I, what day is it, am I still having a good time?



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2009
    Location
    a little north of Columbus GA
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    Default

    I'd probably just let her know that you're planning to put him up for sale and ask whether she has any interest in having him back.

    She knows you and the horse, so who knows, it might be a quick and easy sale.

    This just heads off someone else seeing the ad and mentioning it to the former owner without having all the details straight.
    --
    Wendy
    ... and Patrick


    3 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2010
    Posts
    19

    Default

    It's complicated (isn't it always?), but my preference would be to not involve former BO. Thanks for your replies!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2005
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,263

    Default

    I was a bit confused initially on how ethics would play into having a gifted horse. Was I the only one to think this was about a horse that was gifted in a brilliant way?


    13 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2010
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Bless his heart, he is most certainly NOT gifted with regards to his IQ. But that doesn't mean mom loves him any less.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2008
    Posts
    4,291

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sanely Eccentric View Post
    I was a bit confused initially on how ethics would play into having a gifted horse. Was I the only one to think this was about a horse that was gifted in a brilliant way?
    No, you were not...it is possible that curiousity caused me to open the thread.

    If you prefer to not involve the former owner, then you can place ads and deal with the potential hurt feelings when former owner sees ad. You can offer horse back for price you are looking to get for horse and see what happens. You can also offer horse back for a high price, to ensure former owner does not purchase. If you do the third, then place ad at more reasonable price, you havae to deal with former owner asking why. You are not obligated to offer horse back at all and not obligated to offer horse back for free.

    What I would do all depends on how much I want the former owner to get the horse back and what I want to deal with. If I did not want the former owner involved at all, I would go with the first option.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 27, 2009
    Posts
    1,976

    Default

    Personally I think the only one to which something is owed the horse and the ethical thing to do is what is in his best interest.

    I wasn't gifted my horse but I bought him with a first right of refusal agreement... It's not an issue because I will never sell my guy (he's 20 now and a heart horse) but I would be very unlikely to honor the first right of refusal were I to sell. I know that the previous owner can't give him the time/care he deserves and I don't feel I could trust them to do right by him in his twilight years. I would have no ethical qualms about breaking that agreement and that is much more clear-cut than what you're dealing with... I may be mistaken but from your posts it sounds like you don't think the former owner can offer the kind of home you want for him. If that's the case I don't think you have any ethical obligation to offer him to them.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 15, 2007
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    819

    Default

    I wasn't gifted my horse, but when I was considering selling her to move onto something a bit more appropriate at the time, I did contact the original owner and ask if there was any interest in them buying her back. I think it might be a nice gesture, but if there were other issues (which it sounds like there might be) then you're under no obligation to contact them.
    “Riding a horse is not a gentle hobby, to be picked up and laid down like a game of Solitaire. It is a grand passion.” ~Emerson


    1 members found this post helpful.

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