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  1. #61
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    Oct. 10, 2007
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    Nah. Love young riders learning. Like I said I'm not perfect either by no means. Right now bringing my new guy along to be my next dressage mount and he throws new tricks in on me that I still need that trainer to say hey, that's your fault or you didn't ask him to do this properly etc. We all are still learning. Even those at the top levels have trainers still.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  2. #62
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    Apr. 2, 2011
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    Westchester, NY
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    Also, just adding based on your responses...never underestimate how far hard work and a good attitude can get you. Because I am sure there are people who saw your video and dismissed you but who, because of your mature replies, would be more inclined to help you


    3 members found this post helpful.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2013
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    USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by rabicon View Post
    Nah. Love young riders learning. Like I said I'm not perfect either by no means. Right now bringing my new guy along to be my next dressage mount and he throws new tricks in on me that I still need that trainer to say hey, that's your fault or you didn't ask him to do this properly etc. We all are still learning. Even those at the top levels have trainers still.
    Yeah, although it's hard to believe that this country's top riders still strive for improvement and learn new things, it happens. Just reminds me of how far I have left to go. Haha. That's another thing that me and other young riders have to remember is that it's almost always never the horse- it's the rider. If your horse isn't getting something your telling it, the rider is the problem. I always try and keep that in the back of my mind. Dealing with horses is like a game that we spend our whole lives trying to figure out how to play, and how to win! Lol.



  4. #64
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    Jan. 31, 2013
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    USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rel6 View Post
    Also, just adding based on your responses...never underestimate how far hard work and a good attitude can get you. Because I am sure there are people who saw your video and dismissed you but who, because of your mature replies, would be more inclined to help you
    Thank you I'll keep that in mind.



  5. #65
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    Jan. 31, 2013
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    USA
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    199

    Default COTHers in Northeast Ohio?

    Just curious, are there any COTHers in northeast Ohio that I can shadow/work with this summer? I would love to get to know some of you in person, I respect you all. Let me know if you will be at any nearby shows, I want to meet as many people as I can and learn as much as I can!
    Last edited by Horserider15; Mar. 4, 2013 at 03:07 PM.



  6. #66
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
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    down the road from bar.ka
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    32,846

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    Why not start a new thread with a title like "looking for some help from N.E Ohio area COTHers"? Start by just asking to visit then do that, see if something turns up. Remember it's not a waste of time just to go look, meet them, see their horses and watch them school.

    You need to start broadening your horizons and practice being a sponge sucking up every bit of knowlege you can even if you never throw a leg over a horse or secure a position. And there is no such thing as too many contacts...so get out there and make them.

    If you really want it? This is how you start.

    Oh, AA season is cranking up and you have some good shows around Cleveland and Buffalo-make it a point to go watch and hang around (unobtrusively) the schooling rings.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  7. #67
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    Jan. 31, 2013
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    USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by findeight View Post
    Why not start a new thread with a title like "looking for some help from N.E Ohio area COTHers"? Start by just asking to visit then do that, see if something turns up. Remember it's not a waste of time just to go look, meet them, see their horses and watch them school.

    You need to start broadening your horizons and practice being a sponge sucking up every bit of knowlege you can even if you never throw a leg over a horse or secure a position. And there is no such thing as too many contacts...so get out there and make them.

    If you really want it? This is how you start.

    Oh, AA season is cranking up and you have some good shows around Cleveland and Buffalo-make it a point to go watch and hang around (unobtrusively) the schooling rings.
    That's a good idea, thanks. I'm gonna really try and get myself there this season, watching and learning. I just need to get my parents to take me. If not, I will have to try and find someone who would want to go with me. I am buying a car this summer so that will help also. Thanks!



  8. #68
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    Jan. 31, 2013
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    USA
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    I will keep everyone updated



  9. #69
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2006
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    Southern Ontario
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    OP, I like you more and more as the thread goes on . I also think your best bet right now is to find a nice barn with a decent lesson program and some boarders (doesn't have to be an A barn!), see if you can trade off work around the barn for lessons and work your way up. You've gotten lots of great advice from many professionals on this thread. I'm just an ammie, but I've been around the block so I'll just throw in a few of my own observations for building a great reputation to make this happen:

    Be as professional as you can, no matter what the establishment, what type of horses or what you are asked to do. That means:

    1. Be on time for everything. In fact, be early. Be friendly without being in people's faces. Be as neat and tidy as possible.

    2. When asked to do something, do it promptly, properly and cheerfully, even if you think it is trivial. Believe it or not, people will notice the kid who does a great job on stalls, scrubs the water buckets and sweeps the aisle properly.

    3. Don't be idle. If you have time on your hands, tidy the tack room or the viewing lounge. Sweep out cobwebs. Act like you take pride in the facility.

    4. Don't gossip. Don't run down trainers, boarders, horses, your own or other facilities.

    5. Watch as much as you can - clinics, lessons, training rides, videos, etc. Read, read, read. Be a sponge -- soak it all in and let little out .

    6. Censor yourself so that your questions don't sound like complaints or excuses, even if you don't mean them that way. Train yourself to say "I'm having trouble keeping his inside shoulder from falling in -- can you help me?" instead of "My line got messed up because he pops his shoulder and leans on me."

    7. Be grateful for whatever you get to ride -- every horse teaches you something. Never, ever, EVER lose your temper on a horse -- this can ruin your reputation in 2 min flat.

    8. Set a very high standard for horsemanship. Whenever you ride, make sure you groom impeccably, cool out properly, take care of tack properly, etc. Be a stickler for detail.

    9. This next one is a bit unfair, but it is reality -- avoid giving your opinion unless it's solicited. Rightly or wrongly, many adults don't like being corrected by a young person. Even if your advice is correct, it's easy to get a reputation as a "know-it-all". Learn to bite your tongue unless you are seeing something truly dangerous or abusive.

    If you do all this, you will become that kid at the barn that everyone likes and wants to help succeed. You will be the "go-to" kid if someone wants a few extra rides on their horse, or someone to work their horse if they are out-of-town, etc. You will develop an excellent reputation as a hard, loyal, pleasant & responsible worker and that reputation is worth its weight in gold. You are a capable rider and will get better with instruction, but everyone's best asset is their attitude. Talent will not make up for all these other things. At my barn there is a young kid who works for lessons and rides and has quite a lot of natural talent. She's a pleasant enough kid, but she is lazy, cuts corners, is gossipy and doesn't demonstrate great horsemanship (can "lose it" on a horse; seems to want to jump as high as possible every ride, etc.). Unless she really changes her ways, I'd never let her ride either of my horses.

    Hope that helps a bit! Hope you can find a nice barn for the summer -- Good luck and keep us posted!


    4 members found this post helpful.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2013
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    USA
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    199

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    Quote Originally Posted by fargaloo View Post
    OP, I like you more and more as the thread goes on . I also think your best bet right now is to find a nice barn with a decent lesson program and some boarders (doesn't have to be an A barn!), see if you can trade off work around the barn for lessons and work your way up. You've gotten lots of great advice from many professionals on this thread. I'm just an ammie, but I've been around the block so I'll just throw in a few of my own observations for building a great reputation to make this happen:

    Be as professional as you can, no matter what the establishment, what type of horses or what you are asked to do. That means:

    1. Be on time for everything. In fact, be early. Be friendly without being in people's faces. Be as neat and tidy as possible.

    2. When asked to do something, do it promptly, properly and cheerfully, even if you think it is trivial. Believe it or not, people will notice the kid who does a great job on stalls, scrubs the water buckets and sweeps the aisle properly.

    3. Don't be idle. If you have time on your hands, tidy the tack room or the viewing lounge. Sweep out cobwebs. Act like you take pride in the facility.

    4. Don't gossip. Don't run down trainers, boarders, horses, your own or other facilities.

    5. Watch as much as you can - clinics, lessons, training rides, videos, etc. Read, read, read. Be a sponge -- soak it all in and let little out .

    6. Censor yourself so that your questions don't sound like complaints or excuses, even if you don't mean them that way. Train yourself to say "I'm having trouble keeping his inside shoulder from falling in -- can you help me?" instead of "My line got messed up because he pops his shoulder and leans on me."

    7. Be grateful for whatever you get to ride -- every horse teaches you something. Never, ever, EVER lose your temper on a horse -- this can ruin your reputation in 2 min flat.

    8. Set a very high standard for horsemanship. Whenever you ride, make sure you groom impeccably, cool out properly, take care of tack properly, etc. Be a stickler for detail.

    9. This next one is a bit unfair, but it is reality -- avoid giving your opinion unless it's solicited. Rightly or wrongly, many adults don't like being corrected by a young person. Even if your advice is correct, it's easy to get a reputation as a "know-it-all". Learn to bite your tongue unless you are seeing something truly dangerous or abusive.

    If you do all this, you will become that kid at the barn that everyone likes and wants to help succeed. You will be the "go-to" kid if someone wants a few extra rides on their horse, or someone to work their horse if they are out-of-town, etc. You will develop an excellent reputation as a hard, loyal, pleasant & responsible worker and that reputation is worth its weight in gold. You are a capable rider and will get better with instruction, but everyone's best asset is their attitude. Talent will not make up for all these other things. At my barn there is a young kid who works for lessons and rides and has quite a lot of natural talent. She's a pleasant enough kid, but she is lazy, cuts corners, is gossipy and doesn't demonstrate great horsemanship (can "lose it" on a horse; seems to want to jump as high as possible every ride, etc.). Unless she really changes her ways, I'd never let her ride either of my horses.

    Hope that helps a bit! Hope you can find a nice barn for the summer -- Good luck and keep us posted!
    Thank you, this was very helpful! I have been researching like crazy and may have found a few places to start at this spring/summer. I will definatley keep you posted!



  11. #71
    Join Date
    Jul. 15, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    915

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    If I were looking for a working student this video wouldn't attract me, while working students do generally ride, they do a lot of other things to.
    Like: Can you do a standing wrap, sweat wrap, polutice? Can you give an im shot, iv shot? Can you body clip, trace clip? How much experience do you have cleaning stalls? Can you drive a tractor? Stick shift? Ever hauled a trailer?

    I would write a resume with all of these types of things in it and clean up the videos as the others suggested (the shaking back and forth sides was driving me nuts!) I would much prefer to see 3 minutes of quality flat work than any squirelly jumping.

    Also as the others suggested, presentation does mean something. Ever drive through a trailer park with lots of run down trailers and a few nicer looking ones with flowers in the yard, well kept lawn etc? Do you think it is because the person living in that trailer is rich? Elbow greese and attention to details go a long way!
    Railgirl.blogspot.com



  12. #72
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2013
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    USA
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    199

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    Quote Originally Posted by MMacallister View Post
    If I were looking for a working student this video wouldn't attract me, while working students do generally ride, they do a lot of other things to.
    Like: Can you do a standing wrap, sweat wrap, polutice? Can you give an im shot, iv shot? Can you body clip, trace clip? How much experience do you have cleaning stalls? Can you drive a tractor? Stick shift? Ever hauled a trailer?

    I would write a resume with all of these types of things in it and clean up the videos as the others suggested (the shaking back and forth sides was driving me nuts!) I would much prefer to see 3 minutes of quality flat work than any squirelly jumping.

    Also as the others suggested, presentation does mean something. Ever drive through a trailer park with lots of run down trailers and a few nicer looking ones with flowers in the yard, well kept lawn etc? Do you think it is because the person living in that trailer is rich? Elbow greese and attention to details go a long way!
    Thank you! And yes, I do understand that working students do much more than just ride. I have a decent amount of experience with basic barn chores that include lots of stall mucking. I can do basic hunter show clipping/shaving but that's about it from the examples you listed. Thank you for your help!



  13. #73
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2008
    Posts
    259

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    First of all I respect the fact that you had nerve to post a video of you riding. These forums can be pretty harsh. I do not have the confidence to post videos of my riding! Second I think it is fabulous that you worked through your defensiveness and are mature enough to accept the wise advice of some of these posters. Good luck to you and I hope things work out for you. You will do well if you work hard and are not afraid to take criticism and do the dirty jobs as well as the riding!!



  14. #74
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2013
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    USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by ultimateshowmom View Post
    First of all I respect the fact that you had nerve to post a video of you riding. These forums can be pretty harsh. I do not have the confidence to post videos of my riding! Second I think it is fabulous that you worked through your defensiveness and are mature enough to accept the wise advice of some of these posters. Good luck to you and I hope things work out for you. You will do well if you work hard and are not afraid to take criticism and do the dirty jobs as well as the riding!!
    Thank you, that's very nice! I'm working on my plan of action, haha. Will let you know how it goes. Thanks for the advice!



  15. #75
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2009
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    593

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    I think that a barn would be lucky to have you! I do think you need to move on to a more advanced program to really improve your riding and horsemanship. Go to shows and watch and learn. Offer to hold a horse for someone and chat with trainers you like when they're not busy. Ask around. Look professional when you go, a tucked in polo shirt with breeches and a belt, your half chaps are fine. Tell people you want to learn and will work hard. You're definitely ready to take the next step!



  16. #76
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    Jan. 31, 2013
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    USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by teddygirl View Post
    I think that a barn would be lucky to have you! I do think you need to move on to a more advanced program to really improve your riding and horsemanship. Go to shows and watch and learn. Offer to hold a horse for someone and chat with trainers you like when they're not busy. Ask around. Look professional when you go, a tucked in polo shirt with breeches and a belt, your half chaps are fine. Tell people you want to learn and will work hard. You're definitely ready to take the next step!
    Thank you for the advice! I appreciate the support



  17. #77
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2010
    Location
    Westford, Massachusetts
    Posts
    4,439

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    I definitely think you need to find a new place to ride and lesson...however you can work that out. If you are getting all these rides on green horses, I'm guessing that you are the "best rider in the barn" or close to it. The fact that you don't have any access to higher level horses implies that as well.

    I'm old and have no great amibitions any more, but I ALWAYS want to improve. My goal, when looking for a trainer/barn is to be no higher than the middle (skill and experience wise) or so compared to the other students/boarders, etc... If I ever found myself the "best rider in the barn", or too close to it, it means I've outgrown that barn and am at risk of not being able to learn or improve any more. I'm pretty careful about where I go, so I've only once been "best rider in the barn" and I couldn't wait to get out of there...that happened a very long time ago, back when I was still a junior. I'm not a pro and no Olympian or anything, so if I'm the most competent person there, I'm in the wrong place. If I even get to the "upper half", I start looking around .



  18. #78
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    Jan. 31, 2013
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    USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canaqua View Post
    I definitely think you need to find a new place to ride and lesson...however you can work that out. If you are getting all these rides on green horses, I'm guessing that you are the "best rider in the barn" or close to it. The fact that you don't have any access to higher level horses implies that as well.

    I'm old and have no great amibitions any more, but I ALWAYS want to improve. My goal, when looking for a trainer/barn is to be no higher than the middle (skill and experience wise) or so compared to the other students/boarders, etc... If I ever found myself the "best rider in the barn", or too close to it, it means I've outgrown that barn and am at risk of not being able to learn or improve any more. I'm pretty careful about where I go, so I've only once been "best rider in the barn" and I couldn't wait to get out of there...that happened a very long time ago, back when I was still a junior. I'm not a pro and no Olympian or anything, so if I'm the most competent person there, I'm in the wrong place. If I even get to the "upper half", I start looking around .
    Those are some very good points you made. It's very observant of you to point out that, because I am riding all of the greenies and have gone through the lesson horses, I am considered "the best at the barn", which is true (not to brag). I have never thought of it that way. I am starting to contact a few nearby stables to work in exchange for lessons- one is a H/J and one is an event barn. However, the barn that I ride at now is very special to me. I have been there since the beginning of my riding life, and have grown a very close relationship with my trainer. I have sort of become like the daughter she never had. I have spent almost every day out there for years and have become a literal family with everyone. I will never "leave", ya know? Eventually I plan to move away to work for a top barn, but I'm kind of nervous to break this news to my trainer. I think she knows that I have been thinking about it, and she really doesn't want me to. She wants me to grow, I think....my question is, how do I stop from feeling like a traitor if I start visiting other stables? I don't want to hurt anyone's feelings! I will still continue to ride/train/show the greenies and whoever else I can at my barn for the next year or so until I graduate, but then I am really thinking about moving closer to a bigger barn where I can go to college and be a working student part time or something. Sorry for my monologue, but can anyone give me some advice on how to say goodbye and keep my relationships, while still branching out to other places?



  19. #79
    Join Date
    Jan. 7, 2001
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    Usually too far from the barn
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    Talking to your trainer might be the hardest part of this transition for you. If you have the time you could offer to continue to do some riding for her. Be sure she understands that it's not personal and that she has giving you a great start. If she is as willing to be realistic as you seem to be, she will know that she is not the person to take you to the next level.
    As for maintaining relationships, that may be up to your current barnmates. Certainly they will take their cues from the trainer but some may see you as snobbish because you are perceived as riding at a "fancy" stable. You have to stay the same and with luck they will recognize it. The ball will be in their court.
    F O.B
    Resident racing historian ~~~ Re-riders Clique
    Founder of the Mighty Thoroughbred Clique



  20. #80
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    Jan. 31, 2013
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    USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Linny View Post
    Talking to your trainer might be the hardest part of this transition for you. If you have the time you could offer to continue to do some riding for her. Be sure she understands that it's not personal and that she has giving you a great start. If she is as willing to be realistic as you seem to be, she will know that she is not the person to take you to the next level.
    As for maintaining relationships, that may be up to your current barnmates. Certainly they will take their cues from the trainer but some may see you as snobbish because you are perceived as riding at a "fancy" stable. You have to stay the same and with luck they will recognize it. The ball will be in their court.
    Ok, thanks. Right now, I'm not going to leave her place, I'm just going to expand this next year, and take some extra lessons elsewhere like everyone here is suggesting. I still have about 3 or 4 horses that I consistently ride for her and a few others and I show a few also, so I am still very active there. But I do want to grow and expand, which she will have to understand. The real hard part will be when I actually decide to leave.



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