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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 17, 2011
    Posts
    38

    Default is this possible? adding DIY stalls onto pre-existing shop

    After looking into the cost of building a barn from scratch, we're considering our options (ouch!) - and the best one at this point is trying to use the existing building and outfit it for our ponies.

    Our new home has a 40'x50' 'shop' that has a very large porch (picture here) with an overhang that might work perfectly for 2 stalls (10' x 12' is what we're going for) to be added on the exterior.

    The dimensions of the porch are 40' long, posts are set at 10' intervals and the overhang is 13', concrete extends to 17'.

    Would love to get any advice on if and how to make this happen without having to buy pre-made stalls. Obviously we'd need to get some grills to cover the windows, but, other than lumber, what supplies would I need? Are there any plans for DIY stalls online anywhere?

    Thanks in advance



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2012
    Location
    gulf coast
    Posts
    1,080

    Default

    Yes, it is very possible. How high is the head clearance, and how big are the 'ponies'? The bigest drawback is going to be rain blowing in. Control this with tarps. To make stalls you could use-
    Round pen panels, 2 that are 10' and two that are 12' for a 10'x12' stall. Use
    plywood and attach it with zip ties to the panels if you need solid walls. This is safe, but not totally permanent. It lets you try out having the stalls on your porch without a permanent comitment. If you like the arangment, build permanent stalls.
    If you don't like it, no harm done. PS cover windows with double thick plexiglass,
    attached to the white frame, or expanded metal. Grills/burgler bars, can get a hoof hung up.
    Use deep shavings, and stall mats on the floor.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,287

    Default

    Nice shop
    I, personally, would not want to put my horses up against the metal siding. The siding looks new, so probably not too bad right now, but I'd want to cover not just the window but the entire side of the shop with wood. I've actually seen horse damage to metal siding like that and although I haven't seen horse injuries myself, the stuff isn't really made to be kicked and pushed up against (unless there is a SOLID wall behind it, not just studs, then you'll probably be OK.)
    OK, next thing, the 6x6 posts would be easy to attach walls to, that's how we refashioned an equipment shed into our barn. But you need something on the other side to attach walls to as well. I'm sure it can be done, but you want the posts to be sturdy, not just set on top of the concrete. There are ways to do this, but it sounds like something you need a contractor to look at... I'm also wondering if you can re-do the front of the shop (take off the metal siding to expose the studs and then re-side). Or would that be getting out of control with expenses?
    We had a dirt/gravel floor in the equipment shed that we reconfigured and it worked out really well, but one word of advice... don't try to save TOO much money up front. We saved money up front by reconfiguring a 3-sided equpment shed into a 4 stall barn with an attached run-in that is on the lower end of the property. Had I thought about it, I should have started from scratch on a higher end of the property and built a new barn because I would have probably spent the same amount of money because I would not have ended up spending so much money controlling mud and run-off. (Ok, maybe not but I sure would have saved a lot of aggravation)

    As far as plans online, when you start retrofitting something like this, you can almost forget about "plans online". Just start looking at every stall you see and think about how that could work in your situation! Our stalls turned out, shall I say, very unique, but they are functional and the most important thing is that they are safe and comfy.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 21, 2010
    Posts
    2,568

    Default

    I'll take some pictures of our barn. It's half barn, half hubby's shop.
    Never mind, I already have them!
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y56/spacytracy05/200911 - Stall Building



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 15, 2009
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    1,999

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by spacytracy View Post
    I'll take some pictures of our barn. It's half barn, half hubby's shop.
    Never mind, I already have them!
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y56/spacytracy05/200911 - Stall Building
    The links didn't work. Photobucket has been quite irritating lately!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2004
    Location
    Rixeyville, VA
    Posts
    6,733

    Default

    I would consider resale value on your property. I would leave the shop alone as is given that it is nice and retro-fitting is going to be complicated. Chances are a future buyer will like it lots more as a shop and not as a barn.

    If I needed two stalls, I would building a run-in which can become two stalls, along with some extra storage area that can be cordoned off from the horses. Mr. IF actually built a 2 story version of this arrangement for me, so I have loft storage above, as well as an enclosed feed room. It was overkill, but who wants to discourage this kind of help.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    43,128

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IronwoodFarm View Post
    I would consider resale value on your property. I would leave the shop alone as is given that it is nice and retro-fitting is going to be complicated. Chances are a future buyer will like it lots more as a shop and not as a barn.

    If I needed two stalls, I would building a run-in which can become two stalls, along with some extra storage area that can be cordoned off from the horses. Mr. IF actually built a 2 story version of this arrangement for me, so I have loft storage above, as well as an enclosed feed room. It was overkill, but who wants to discourage this kind of help.
    That leaving that pretty building alone is what I was thinking also.

    Build something else somewhere else for the horses, portable best, so you can sell/move it later if you change what you are doing.

    Here are some ideas of simple two stall with feed/tack room little portable buildings anyone in your area may build, a welder or carpentry shop:

    http://gobobpipe.com/sheds.htm



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2013
    Location
    Southeastern US
    Posts
    1,776

    Default

    I don't think it would work well because there isn't enough of an overhang so you're stall would get wet. It's also troubling that it has low windows and metal siding.

    I agree about building a separate run-in shed and dividing it into two stalls. I had a run-in built with a half wall in between two stalls. It also had two large paddocks and each had a gate out to the shared pasture. That worked great.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2006
    Location
    SF Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    1,811

    Default

    I would also leave that beautiful storage building and lovely porch overhang ALONE!!!

    Just build two stalls elsewhere You can search Craigslist for lots of reasonable options. We just bought a used barn off Craigslist for a steal
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Equine & Pet Portrait Artist
    www.elainehickman.com
    **Morgans Do It All**



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Sanger, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,977

    Default

    I'm in the leave it alone category. Or, do you have another side that could be used. We looked at a place a couple of years ago with a workshop. My idea was to extend a roof out from the side and put some stalls there. The roof would be
    far enough out to have a aisleway between the stalls and side of the workshop.
    The far wall would have dutch doors so they can wander in and out and be able to closed if weather bad or rain blowing from that direction. Would have enough room for 3 or 4 stalls or just 2 and tack/room and feed storage. Something like that might be an option.

    We looked at some other places with really big workshops (they are big down here since there are no basements) and would have converted a portion of the workshop into stalls.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2003
    Location
    Windward Farm, Washougal, WA- our work in progress, our money pit, our home!
    Posts
    7,145

    Default

    Sure, it absolutely can be done! If $$ is really and issue, and you have this building sitting there begging to be used...then...use it!

    Do you want to enclose this and access them from just the outside stall doors? Easy--you'll need to frame in each end, and cover the existing windows/metal wall with either 2 x 6's or (as I did) 3/4inch marine-grade plywood to protect building and horses. Lay a double layer (if they'll be in more than a few hours a day) of rubber mats. If it were me, I'd use components from a company like Priefert and bolt them in. I'd do 12 x 12 stalls--my stalls are built this way: components placed in an existing building with 10 foot posts like you have, so I have a post set in 2 feet from the front corner of each stall, which has never been an issue.

    That will give you two 12 x 12 stalls, bolted to the wall and post, but that can be removed later if needed. You'll have a slight overhang over each stall (but rain will come in, as will snow, unless you frame in the whole front, which really wouldn't be that big a deal.).
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    4,745

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IronwoodFarm View Post
    I would consider resale value on your property. I would leave the shop alone as is given that it is nice and retro-fitting is going to be complicated. Chances are a future buyer will like it lots more as a shop and not as a barn.
    .
    Since we are in an urban area we built our barn with the potential to be converted into a garage/shop.... the advantages were two fold... as a barn it appraised 50% less for property taxes, as a garage/shop it appraised 100% higher for loan value.



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