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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
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    Default Looking forward to dog trainer coming on Tuesday - new dog PULLS

    We love our new dog, but OMG, he PULLS. He is so anxious to say hello to other dogs that he has yanked me off my feet twice. It is not at all aggressive (one he sniffs, he goes on his merry way) but he is SO crazy to get over to the other dog. I'm using a harness and a prong collar to have some fighting chance!

    Trainer is coming to the house on Tuesday - whew! I hope she has plans we can follow!
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  2. #2
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    Nov. 29, 2007
    Location
    Virginia
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    948

    Default

    Do you have a Sporn halter? Won't teach him not to pull, but will diffuse his force tremendously, giving you some relief while you train.
    "However complicated and remarkable the rest of his life was going to be, it was here now, come to claim him."- JoAnn Mapson



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 3, 2009
    Location
    Central Indiana
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    259

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    Gentle leader!
    Life-long horse lover, dreaming of the day when I have one of my very own.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
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    Sep. 5, 2005
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    Mass.
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    I thought about going out and getting a Halti/gentle leader type, but at this point will wait and see what the trainer says. I will do whatever necessary to stop the pulling. DD can't walk him (she is tiny.)
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2002
    Location
    Indiana
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    11,017

    Default

    I think of it like lunging a horse. If you are behind them directly then a horse can drag you around. But if you are at the right angle you can pull a horse off its feet.

    A dog is smaller then a horse.

    It has been awhile since I have trained dogs, but this method worked for me every time. If you stand directly behind a dog they will pull and since nothing changes except that they get to go toward what they want they continue to pull.

    Walk dog in a big open space. As dog is about to hit the end of the leash head in the other direction at an angle. The angle will give you some leverage and the dog will hit the end of the leash and spin around a bit. Look at dog like he is nuts.

    Repeat. Every time the dog is about to hit the end of the leash and pull turn on your heel at an angle.

    IGNORE.

    Every time the dog lets the leash go slack and comes back to you PRAISE.

    A smart dog learns very quickly where the end of the leash is and that hitting the end results in him being yo yo'd. You don't have to yell at him or say anything or correct him so it isn't really associated with you. The dog figures out where his boundries are and you can start your heeling training by praising him if he comes back to you.

    I always did this in a regular collar, we didn't have all the extra fancy stuff back then and I wouldn't want to use a chain for it.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2001
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    Almost Aiken
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    Default

    Harnesses were made to pull against. Your best best is a plain flat martingale collar, Gentle Leader or a small prong collar, and the ONLY way he gets to go anywhere is if there's little or no tension on the leash. If he pulls, you plant yourself until he stops pulling. If he's really obnoxious, you can use a sharp pop on the leash with the martingale collar or a flat buckle collar, not with the others.

    Just like with a horse, sometimes a well-timed snap of the lead brings them to their senses, for a minute anyway.

    Once the lead is slack and/or he's given you a microsecond of attention, then he can go forward. The minute he lunges, you stay put. You can help get his attention aon you with some super special treats - deli ham or hot dog or something. And he only gets it when he's choosing you over the other dog or person out there.

    Good luck!


    eta, yes also to the changes of direction - keep him guessing. YOU get to dictate where and when he goes, he can politely request to go sniff, but he doesn't get to dictate.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
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    Sep. 5, 2005
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    Mass.
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    Thanks for the great suggestions!
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 27, 2009
    Posts
    937

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    I followed the technique enjoytheride described with my lab when I adopted him. The obedience class I took used that technique and it worked great. FWIW, when I was training my dog I didn't have much of an open area to work him in so I had to use that technique on the sidewalk and it was still effective. Good luck!
    Cascadia- OTTB mare. 04/04-05/10
    If love could have saved you, you would have lived forever



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    Montana
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    Default

    I've had and seen a lot of success with prong collars.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania
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    5,041

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    FWIW teaching a dog to heel has less to do with the equipment and more to do with the technique. I clip my leashes to my waist because it is easier to train the heel with a stationary object (my body) that doesn't reward pulling even a little bit. Your hand does -it is weak and gives a bit before you stop the pull.

    I walk my dogs -Rhodesian Ridgebacks -on harnesses because I find them healthier for the dog than attaching the leash to the collar and they did not pull. Yoshi is 115 and he gets walked on a harness.

    Paula
    He is total garbage! Quick! Hide him on my trailer (Petstorejunkie).



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2005
    Location
    Washington State
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    1,474

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    Short term - try a halti or gentle leader. They work miracles with dogs that pull.
    Long term - learn clicker training.
    Crayola Posse - Pine Green
    RIP Whinnie Pine (June 4, 1977 - April 29, 2008)


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2007
    Location
    ....in a classroom in Fl, by the ocean
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    3,677

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    I put the most important statement. Dogs will always pull against tension. I would add that the collar should be at the top of the neck, where the throat latch would, just behind the ears; not down around the base of the neck.

    Also if the dog is treat motivated, keep some small, yummy treats in your hand and when you tell him to heel, come, stay what ever word you use or click for him to NOT pull to greet the other dog, reward.

    Quote Originally Posted by saje View Post
    Harnesses were made to pull against. Your best best is a plain flat martingale collar, Gentle Leader or a small prong collar, and the ONLY way he gets to go anywhere is if there's little or no tension on the leash. If he pulls, you plant yourself until he stops pulling. If he's really obnoxious, you can use a sharp pop on the leash with the martingale collar or a flat buckle collar, not with the others.

    Just like with a horse, sometimes a well-timed snap of the lead brings them to their senses, for a minute anyway.

    Once the lead is slack and/or he's given you a microsecond of attention, then he can go forward. The minute he lunges, you stay put. You can help get his attention aon you with some super special treats - deli ham or hot dog or something. And he only gets it when he's choosing you over the other dog or person out there.

    Good luck!


    eta, yes also to the changes of direction - keep him guessing. YOU get to dictate where and when he goes, he can politely request to go sniff, but he doesn't get to dictate.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 10, 2001
    Location
    Rising Sun, Maryland, USA
    Posts
    5,122

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    I have a puller, too... he's a big young lab that had virtually no training when we got him at 1 year old. At home he is fairly good, but out in public he can be a beast! I've had the best success with a gentle leader, but two hikes ago, he pulled on it so much during a group hike (I couldn't exactly school him or take him home) that he rubbed through his nose and was bleeding!!!! He is one tough dog and didn't think that wow my nose is sore maybe I'd better stop pulling!!! It took forever to heal.

    At home I have a lot of success with changing directions.... letting him hit the end of the lead... walking him nest to a wall and putting a knee into his chest/face if he tries to come too far forward. But the problem is when we go out in public he is a million times stronger and totally forgets his brain. Sigh.
    http://www.leakycreek.com/
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  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr. 22, 2011
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    Wait for your trainer. They will take you and your dog into consideration and will help you learn technique with whatever method and equipment they recommend. Until then, changing directions and also simply coming to a dead stop when Dog begins to pull are certainly the safest and most effective options. I'd hold off on the headcollar devices--unless your trainer advocates its use and shows you how to fit and use it correctly, you could do damage.

    Bottom line is that no matter what you use, your dog needs to learn that any pulling at all is not acceptable. To get there in all situations is a journey that takes some time, since "no pull" is a fluid command-not black and white like Sit or Come. Discuss in depth the methodology of this training with your trainer.

    I tell my clients to imagine their 80 year old grandmother walking the dog on a buckle collar and a silk ribbon lead - that's the goal. This visualization seems to help them in their awareness of circumstances likely to cause pulling or bolting or lunging.

    I find that success is directly proportional to awareness of and reaction to the dog's movement on the lead, from the moment you snap that lead on If you want a polite silk ribbon dog, you must work hard for it, no matter which technique (clicker, conventional) or equipment (headcollar, prong, buckle collar) you use.



  15. #15
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    Sep. 5, 2005
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    Mass.
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    We practiced the quick unexpected turns today! It really helped!
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  16. #16
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    Apr. 22, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guin View Post
    He is so anxious to say hello to other dogs that he has yanked me off my feet twice. It is not at all aggressive (one he sniffs, he goes on his merry way) but he is SO crazy to get over to the other dog.!
    He now expects and INSISTS on meeting other dogs he sees, because it sounds like you've allowed it at least once in the past-sometimes, that's all it takes. Save the socializing for the yard and a few well-chosen friends, or the dog park (I hate them, but that's me).

    Absolutely no socializing with other dogs (or even humans if it causes him to lose his marbles) when on lead--no exceptions until he is truly rehabilitated, using the training methods your trainer advocates.

    As an owner on the other side of the street walking my intact male 96 lb. Lab, 75 lb. Berner, and 2 JRTs, there is nothing worse than encountering an out of control dog dragging its owner over to me Bad things can ensue. Its imperative that you maintain control of your dog and know that not all other dogs particularly want to meet him, and same with their owners. This should be an acknowledged universal tenet of dog ownership.

    I teach my clients the "no socialization on lead" rule right away, since it is the kindest and easiest way to avoid the problems with pulling that you are experiencing. Simply put, whenever your dog is onlead, you two are in your own little no-pulling loose-lead bubble, be it on the street or at the vet's office.

    And if you are on the receiving end of uncontrolled dog attention, do what you have to do to prevent it-cross the street, retreat up someone's driveway, turn and run away, holler at the miscreant owner in your best She Who Must Be Obeyed voice, whatever you have you have to do to prevent contact.

    You can explain that your dog is in training later Or not--there are a couple of dog owners in my suburban neighborhood who think I'm a high-riding bitch, and that's just fine with me as it keeps them and their dogs just moving right along



  17. #17
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    Apr. 22, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guin View Post
    We practiced the quick unexpected turns today! It really helped!
    Great! You may not walk as far, but you can be walking for just as long. Just stop if you get dizzy


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2007
    Location
    TN
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    I really like teaching an "eyes on me" cue and smart, food-motivated dogs pick it up FAST. Pretty much every time they look at you, say whatever cue you want to use and shove a treat in their mouth. Once you have it installed, when you see them take a look at something you can redirect them. Eventually they get the idea that it's easier to just pay close attention to you the whole way!
    "Things turn out best for the people who make the best of the way things turn out." ~John Wooden

    Phoenix Animal Rescue



  19. #19
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    Feb. 18, 2008
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
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    I've joined the clicker cult and I have to say it's helped TREMENDOUSLY with my 55lb pit-type-mutt and her pulling. We're not quite there yet, but we do plenty of "walk, click, treat, turn around, click, treat, walk," and I've progressively been able to get farther and farther on my walks in the allotted time. If she gets really beastly/distracted/overbearing, we either stop until she settles down and comes back to me, or we turn around and walk in circles.

    For normal walks, she goes in a standard red nylon martingale collar with a 4ft leather leash. When I'm somewhere more stimulating, like the park or barn, I use one of the pull-proof harnesses that clips in the front, so that when she pulls, she gets turned around.

    It's a long road with dogs who have already learned to pull, but it's definitely worth the hard work in the end (I hope...).



  20. #20
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    Oct. 24, 2001
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    Virginia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rallycairn View Post
    Do you have a Sporn halter? Won't teach him not to pull, but will diffuse his force tremendously, giving you some relief while you train.
    We've got one of the Sporn no-pull harnesses for our dog, and it's been great. Other than her chewing through the mesh She's more of a puller out of wanting to go faster than we necessarily want to walk. We've been working on the whole "be a tree" idea when she starts pulling--just stop, and in my case, I've been reinforcing verbally with "whoa" until she stops and there's slack on the lead, then I ask her to "walk on." She's smart, so it's been pretty effective with her.



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