The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2003
    Posts
    73

    Default What payment arrangements are normal to have your hay cut/baled?

    We recently bought some property about 25 acres of which are hayfield. A local farmer has been cutting the hay and has agreed to do so for us. My question - what do you pay for this? We certainly won't need nearly as much hay for our ponies as will be produced. Do most people split the costs/profits? Take a percentage of the hay and sell what we don't need (Don't think we will have storage for this) Have the farmer take all the hay and pay us per bale/ton/set fee? On average, how much hay is normally harvested per acre?
    Thanks for any guidance you can offer.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2013
    Posts
    50

    Default

    I pay $80 per hour for cutting as well as raking for my neighbor to come by when he is also doing hay. Bailing is $1 per bail and I load it all into my barn by trailer. I harvest aprox 12 acres and get 900 bails the first cut and 700 for the second. He cuts all of his own hay so paying with my extra will not do for him. I pay for the bailer twine, have my own hay trailers and give him a $100 gas card as a thank you. Equipment is very expensive unless you are a mechanic and can buy older machines. I find this deal works out well but if he was any further down the township, it may not even be possible for him to come to do hay.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2002
    Location
    Northern KY
    Posts
    4,416

    Default It depends on how much hay you need

    Since I only need a couple of hundred square bales a year, and our 40 acres of hayfield is lovely, the guys that do mine cherry pick the nicest areas for the horses, give me 200 bales then round bale the rest for their cattle. This works fairly well for me, except that they sometimes let the hayfield grasses have seedheads, which works well for their cattle, but I would prefer if it was cut a bit sooner so as to be a bit nicer.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2002
    Location
    East of Dog River
    Posts
    5,525

    Default

    I am on a 1/3-2/3 crop share. They deliver what I will need then pay me market price for what is left. They also pick the better stuff for the horses, mine and theirs.

    How much you get per acre, however, is dependant on weather, soil type, fertiliser, equipement, and other random things you can do nothing about. On the yard, IF it doesn't water out, i will get around 8 tons off four acres and the hayland is an entirely different animal - different soil, never broke so far different grasses, and that can range from 70 bales averaging 1600 pounds to as high as 130 and it all depends on the river and flooding. No certainties there.
    Founder of the Dyslexic Clique. Dyslexics of the world - UNTIE!!

    Member: Incredible Invisbles



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2004
    Location
    Rixeyville, VA
    Posts
    6,368

    Default

    We have a local farmer make round bales. We keep all the hay. We pay him 2/3 the market price for mowing, baling and moving the bales in our barn. The arrangement works well for everyone!
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 23, 2001
    Location
    Catharpin, Virginia
    Posts
    6,620

    Default

    When I used to have one of my pastures cut and baled, it was barter.

    The hayman would put up what hay I needed for the winter in my hayloft and he would keep the rest. I'm guessing I got about 40% of the hay.

    Worked out well.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 27, 2010
    Location
    SE VA
    Posts
    1,165

    Default

    We had a neighbor cut and bale ours, we kept all the hay for ourselves. Unless it got rained on or something, then he round baled it and took it to his house and paid me 25 a bale. We paid him $2 per square to bale.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2011
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    32

    Default

    You could find out what local custom rates are for cutting, raking and baling hay by visiting with your county extension professional. That should give you some idea of what it might cost to hire the work done. No matter what it cost it would be cheaper than owning the equipment and trying to do it yourself on that sort of acreage.

    We board a lot of horses and do some farming besides. As such we get approached fairly regularly about 'share' agreements on relatively small acreages. Frankly for small acreages it's not worth the hassle or the wear and tear on the equipment for me to drive any distance, do all the work and receive a portion of the hay back for my time and effort. If the acreage is higher (100 plus) or the property literally abuts mine (we do this for one neighbour with an open 40 acre field with whom we share a gate) then it may become worthwhile.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2011
    Location
    The Land of Buggies and Black Bumpers
    Posts
    819

    Default

    We have a neighbor who does ours for us. First cutting last year we paid $1.75 per small bale to have it baled for our horses. That was current custom rate for our area. Second and third cuttings, he round baled everything since we had already put away enough for ourselves, and he paid us the difference between what it cost to bale and what market price was for round bales at the time.

    We all walked away happy and we had enough income from hay to pay the fuel bill for the house for the year. My husband and I also decided we did not want to sell hay off the farm- too much headache since we both work away and have many other commitments with the other farm animals. Our neighbor runs 350 head of cattle and goes through 1 round bale per day in his TMR so it worked out that we all got what we needed.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2003
    Posts
    73

    Default

    Thanks all. We have a local farmer who has cut the hay for years. We bought the property from one of his relatives a few years ago. We had him fertilize the past 2 years - it hadn't been done in all the years he had cut the hay. He said last year was the best hay and highest yield he has ever had. We were just happy to have someone taking care of the haying so we didn't take a share even though he kept offering. Now that we are moving to the property and will need hay for our ponies we need to know what kind of agreement is normal/fair. We certainly don't want to insult him by asking for something silly out of ignorance.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York
    Posts
    3,927

    Default

    I think the advice to talk to County Extension is good.

    In our case, the farmer bales all the hay and puts what I need up in my barn. He charges me $4.00/bale for it to be put up in my mow, and gives me a $1500 credit on the total hay bill for the use of the rest of our farm (almost 200 acres, though not all is usable). I can never remember how many bales I get, but I have 10 - 11 horses here and the mow is full. The farmer keeps the rest of the hay to sell. He also plants corn on some of our fields.



Similar Threads

  1. Weaning arrangements - again!
    By Dorienna in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: Oct. 16, 2011, 12:46 PM
  2. NEED INPUT. Just had my hay baled.
    By Liscar in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: Jun. 16, 2011, 12:22 PM
  3. Replies: 3
    Last Post: Oct. 1, 2010, 11:02 PM
  4. Arrangements for horses in will?
    By GreenTeaLeaves in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: Jan. 22, 2010, 10:49 PM
  5. Tightly Baled Hay
    By KatherineC in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: Jan. 4, 2010, 10:50 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness