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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun. 27, 2001
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    Westport, Oklahoma
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    358

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    I can mount my old horse from anything and anywhere, and with this current horse, he'd likely be okay from the fence at home if we work on it a lot. However, he has panic attacks in new places so it will likely be a real challenge.
    Darn, I didn't really want to be a spectacle, but I am going to get help with a difficult horse.
    airhorse - what is "the weave"?



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2001
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    Cullowhere?, NC
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    The clinics I attended were at a facility that's primarily a dressage/breeding farm. There was a mounting block available. I'm a fat olde pharte and really can't mount from the ground any more, and my using the mounting block was not an issue. My horses are polite about it, and I had experience in similar clinics with a student of Buck's so I know how to make my horses be polite around a mounting block.

    Buck knows how to deal with what you're describing about your horse and strange crowds. He deals with what is in front of him; you do not have to worry about not fitting in or holding anyone back, or having "bigger" problems than anyone else. He simply deals with what is brought to him, and gives you tools to continue to deal with it after he leaves. That IS THE WHOLE POINT of his clinics. People with interesting issues are a bonus to everyone present, because just watching everyone be successful builds egos, but it does not teach that much. Don't worry about it. Just go with an honest appraisal of where you and your horse are, be open to what he offers you, keep trying, and YOU . WILL . BE . FINE!!
    "One person's cowboy is another person's blooming idiot" -- katarine

    Spay and neuter. Please.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2012
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    84

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    His Montana clinics are still on the small side. He has two clinics here this summer that are on the 15-20 people range and I'm not sure they even get that many. Definitely no auditors. Not all of his clinics are the same.
    I think you're referring to the McGinnis Meadows Ranch clinics - and you're right those are different from his regular clinics in that they are held at a guest ranch with lodging and meals included. I believe those are smaller groups, but I could be wrong. And they definitely don't allow auditors.

    The other clinic in Montana is Betty Staley's clinic. The Colt class has 12 riders - I think that's always the limit for that class. The H1 class has 25 riders. And both of those classes were full at the end of last year.

    Seems like its almost impossible to get into a clinic since the movie Buck came out. So happy I was able to get a spot this year!!



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jun. 27, 2001
    Location
    Westport, Oklahoma
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    358

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    Thanks monstrpony! That's really helpful. I was really considering not riding and just auditing because I didn't want to spend 20 minutes the first day trying to mount my crazy horse from the ground!
    We will work on mounting from the fence at home, but I might also ask the organizer if there will be a mounting block there or if I could even bring a small step. Geez, I hate if that makes me sound like some english rider wimp, but I know this horse and this issue for him in new places.
    Was also wondering, can you bring your normal stuff in with you? Like a dressage whip, or a modified one with a handkerchief on the end? Should I leave my martingale off to start?
    Really appreciate the clarifications - it's a whole other type of clinic than I've ever done.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2007
    Location
    Montana
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    5,716

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    TBFAN it wouldn't surprise me if you end up spending your whole clinic working on that issue! Or fixing it in the first few minutes.

    I used to go to Buck's clinics in Bozeman and they weren't exactly a mob scene but it's true; the movie has changed things. I believe he's alternating Bozeman now with the Sheridan clinics.
    Last edited by cowboymom; Mar. 1, 2013 at 04:12 PM.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2006
    Location
    SF Bay Area, California
    Posts
    4,681

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    Lots of interesting info here from people who have attended his clinics in Gilroy, CA.

    http://members2.boardhost.com/baen/msg/1360625007.html

    OP, are you riding in Gilroy?
    Proud owner of a Slaughter-Bound TB from a feedlot, and her surprise baby...!
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e350/Jen4USC/fave.jpg
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e3...SC/running.jpg



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2000
    Location
    California
    Posts
    8,442

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    Thanks for the info! I'm a good student - I listen well, do my exercises, and I would never dream of talking back!!! I tend to be more of a wallflower so I may not even make a peep!

    I did buy a flag and have been working with it for a couple weeks. I'm trying to work on exercises from the DVD so that I can better my rope-handling and flag skills before the clinic. Also, so my horse can be used to the flag work ahead of time.

    I'm pretty sure I could mount from the fence, but I'll have to start working on that. Would it be lame of me to wear breeches and tall boots? Or should I just wear paddock boots and half chaps? I know that's a silly question, but it is important to me! I will say that in the DVDs, I do call some of the ladies cowgirl Barbies because you can see that they got all their fancy hats and chinks (is that what you call chaps that aren't full chaps but cover the thighs and not the calves) and scarves and Chanel sunglasses, etc. It is kind of funny!

    It makes ME nervous to ride in a big group of people. It didn't used to bother me until this horse bucked me off in a most glorious fashion last year and since then it has made me really nervous. I signed up for the Foundation Horsemanship group which is 1/2 groundwork and 1/2 riding (in the same session). I thought that would help settle me more. I need help keeping my energy down, keeping the horse focused on me, and not tensing up and worrying about what other people are doing.

    Sounds like I'll be in the right place!

    (oh, I'm doing the Red Bluff clinic)
    My Mustang Adventures - Mac, my mustang | Annwylid D'Lite - my Cob filly

    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2001
    Location
    Cullowhere?, NC
    Posts
    8,652

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    TBFAN--YOu can ride with your dressage whip just as it is, if that's what you're used to. You may get a little gentle ribbing, because the working cowboys need their hands for reins and roping, so they develop their horses so they don't have to "rely" on whips. But dressage riders use their whips in a different way, it isn't just go-forward. Buck knows this and won't make you put it down or anything. You don't want to be riding with a whip made into a flag. That's more for ground work with your own horse, or if you were to be working another horse from horseback (which he may do to you, but you won't be doing this). It will help if your horse is fairly comfortable with using a flag on the ground as there will be several other horses in the ring and many of the handlers may choose to use a flag for their groundwork. Also, a bit later in the mounted stuff, Buck may use a flag to encourage your horse to move thru certain exercises. Don't worry; it seems terrifying, but Buck is *very good* at reading just how much your horse will tolerate, and he is not interested in getting you dumped! Just trust him.

    If you normally ride with a martingale and feel you need it, then put it on. He may ask you to remove it, but he'll give you a good explanation of why you should want to become independent of it, and he will help you get there. Be open-minded about it. Just give him a clear, honest picture of where you are to start and let him guide you toward where he would like you to be. Don't try to second-guess what he "wants" and put yourself in a bad place by trying to conform to some pre-conceived idea (that, actually, he would criticize--but probably in a gentle, joking way). Just be honest about where you are.

    PP--wear whatever you are comfortable in. I've seen english riders in breeches and boots, and in breeches and half chaps. LIke any other clinic, clean, neat, workman-like and comfortable is it. Buck sees through the Barbie stuff, it doesn't impress him. What DOES impress him is workmanlike, willing to listen and learn, and genuine effort.

    When you find yourself needing to lower your energy and you just-can't-seem-to-get-it-done, don't forget to breathe. A good, deep breath, let out slowly, is one of my favorite tools when I get wound up. One of my horses will do all of his downward transitions in a round pen on this aid alone--just a deep breathe, let out slowly, and he's gone from trot to walk, or canter to trot.
    "One person's cowboy is another person's blooming idiot" -- katarine

    Spay and neuter. Please.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2000
    Location
    California
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    8,442

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    Quote Originally Posted by monstrpony View Post
    When you find yourself needing to lower your energy and you just-can't-seem-to-get-it-done, don't forget to breathe. A good, deep breath, let out slowly, is one of my favorite tools when I get wound up. One of my horses will do all of his downward transitions in a round pen on this aid alone--just a deep breathe, let out slowly, and he's gone from trot to walk, or canter to trot.
    I use breath the same way, too - this horse will also go from canter to trot / trot to walk / walk to halt with a long exhale.

    Glad to hear all of the feedback - I, too, ride with a dressage whip - not for "forward" per se, but for "move that shoulder over, move that haunch" which I'm sure Buck does with a simple thought. I'll start with it and see how it goes.
    My Mustang Adventures - Mac, my mustang | Annwylid D'Lite - my Cob filly

    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2011
    Posts
    1,040

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    Quote Originally Posted by TBFAN View Post
    airhorse - what is "the weave"?
    Split the group in two, half on the rail going one direction, the other half inside going the other way. You must weave in and out of the riders going the opposite direction. Fun at the walk, exciting at the trot, even more fun with no reins. This is a true Ray Hunt exercise.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2007
    Location
    The Goodland, CA
    Posts
    547

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    I'm envious!

    I've audited 2 clinics (Ojai and Pasadena) in the last two years and would love love love to ride in one. Gonna audit the Ojai clinic again this year. I learned a lot, even as an auditor. There are some issues that my horse and I have worked on that have been improved by watching the clinics. A friend of mine has the original groundwork DVD and I'm working my way through that.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2004
    Location
    South Park
    Posts
    3,355

    Thumbs down

    I had a much different experience when auditing 2 summers ago.
    Went with several friends, we all paid good money up front, and not only did Buck not address the audience at all, he spent very little time speaking to the participants, so we could not figure out much of what was going on. Buck sat on his horse in the middle twirling his rope and making practice catches (no one else was roping.) This was day 3 of a 3-day clinic. We came back after lunch break and it was more of the same, so we ended up leaving early - very disappointed.
    Glad to hear that it's not the norm but it certainly did not make me want to take a clinic with him.
    A friend told me I was delusional. I almost fell off my unicorn.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,682

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    OP- others on this board use this technique too, but seriously try "Square Breathing". Breathe in through nose for a count of 4 (or 3 if that suits your lungs), hold it for count of 4, exhale through mouth for a count of 4, then hold again for count of 4. When I do this my mare goes instantly from a jigging nightmare to walking rhythmically to my breathing, and my tension is gone.
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2006
    Location
    Lexington, Kentucky
    Posts
    3,303

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    Is it H1 or H2 you are doing? I have ridden in an H2 and am riding in an H1 this year.
    If you can, audit the other class, he often asks questions or repeats things from that. He actually spoke a lot to us, and the audience here. I think the last day we must have spent an hour in a QandA session (horseback), and it was invaluable. Honestly the four days all really came together for me the last day.

    My OTTB also was not a fan of the group thing, and I remember him helping another woman with her horse who was afraid of oncoming horses. Mine didn't like standing in the group when we were playing 'cow', but he got over it! It was great swinging a rope off of him and dragging a log, kinda proud.

    He did give me a bad time for being in two point too often at the canter (I had my reasons), but if a little ribbing doesn't bother you you're way ahead. A lot of times he will say nothing to you if you are doing things right.

    The tools he will give you for problems and issues are invaluable. My horse got way hot and bothered out in open fields with other horses (like a xc schooling day), and the serpentines and yielding the hind/front exercise was/is a HUGE help. It truly helps you just think differently about problem solving.

    I love the 7clinics dvd's and they will make even more sense to you after this clinic. Have a great time, if you're going to have problems, this is the place to have them!

    Oh, meant to add, if it was me, I'd take off the martingale. And also any flash, drop or figure 8 that goes over the bit and mouth.



    Here's a favorite pic of mine
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    We're spending our money on horses and bourbon. The rest we're just wasting.
    www.dleestudio.com


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2007
    Location
    Pen Argyl PA
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    4,030

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    DLee- great pic. I am so impressed with Buck and his life story. He is an amazing man.



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2011
    Posts
    108

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    He's an excellent teacher; he doesn't suffer fools, or people who talk while he's teaching, though.
    Dress boots would be a little overkill, IMO, but go as you're most comfortable.

    The tools he gives you are invaluable. Enjoy yourself.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2001
    Location
    Cullowhere?, NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by BEARCAT View Post
    I had a much different experience when auditing 2 summers ago.
    Went with several friends, we all paid good money up front, and not only did Buck not address the audience at all, he spent very little time speaking to the participants, so we could not figure out much of what was going on. Buck sat on his horse in the middle twirling his rope and making practice catches (no one else was roping.) This was day 3 of a 3-day clinic. We came back after lunch break and it was more of the same, so we ended up leaving early - very disappointed.
    Glad to hear that it's not the norm but it certainly did not make me want to take a clinic with him.
    This often happens on the third day of the clinic. It isn't that nothing is going on; its that he's given the group a task, sometimes just doing something for a prolonged period of time (his "long trots" are famous). While he may not be interacting with the audience, he IS keeping track of what's going on. Honestly, he does have eyes in the back of his head!

    This is the problem with trying to just audit a day, or a few hours of a Buck clinic. It's the four-day process that makes it all come together (as DLee says), even for auditors. Especially if you don't know what his clinics are like, auditing for just a part will very possibly be a disappointment.

    Back to the martingale thing--He does not like them, he will make you take it off. But I think its most important that you present yourself as you are, not as you think/have been told/imagine he wants you to be. He'll probably be able to see it anyway, but if you are in a place where you think your horse needs a martingale, it's important for him to know that. If the option is for you to take it off and have your horse flinging its head around--that's not the picture you want to bring; you at least want him to know that your horse has an issue and that you and whoever is behind you have attempted to address it.

    Buck has the horse's interest as the foundation of everything he does. He really doesn't care what discipline you ride in or what you do with your horse. He wants your horse to be totally comfortable within himself and for your partnership with your horse to be something that your horse understands completely and is at peace with. Behavior problems are nothing more than an indication of a disconnect between you and your horse, and Buck's goal is to find the basis of the disconnect and fix it. If you have to ride with a martingale, it's because of a disconnect; he will help you fix it. If your horse is uncomfortable in a group, its a disconnect--possibly more of a social issue to the horse, but if your partnership is the primary thing to that horse, the rest of the world will be less of a bother to him. Buck will help you fix that. Whether you ride with the martingale or not, Buck will see the issue and help you fix it. But if you come into the clinic from a place where you've been riding with the martingale, you are showing him a more honest picture if you have it on. He probably will rib you about it, and he will take it off. That said, if your need for the martingale is marginal, or just a style/habit, I would leave it off--that shows you're interested enough to have asked what he does and doesn't like
    "One person's cowboy is another person's blooming idiot" -- katarine

    Spay and neuter. Please.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2006
    Location
    Lexington, Kentucky
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    3,303

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nezzy View Post
    DLee- great pic. I am so impressed with Buck and his life story. He is an amazing man.
    Thanks Nezzy You will love the dvd's, and the clinic!
    We're spending our money on horses and bourbon. The rest we're just wasting.
    www.dleestudio.com


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2001
    Location
    Ft Worth, TX, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by TBFAN View Post
    I can mount my old horse from anything and anywhere, and with this current horse, he'd likely be okay from the fence at home if we work on it a lot. However, he has panic attacks in new places so it will likely be a real challenge.
    Darn, I didn't really want to be a spectacle, but I am going to get help with a difficult horse.
    airhorse - what is "the weave"?
    I'll hold him for you, if it means I get to see you mount from the ground
    "Everyone will start to cheer, when you put on your sailin shoes"-Lowell George

    What's the status on Tuco?



  20. #40
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    Oct. 3, 2012
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    2,042

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    Quote Originally Posted by dreamswept View Post
    I'm envious!

    I've audited 2 clinics (Ojai and Pasadena) in the last two years and would love love love to ride in one. Gonna audit the Ojai clinic again this year. I learned a lot, even as an auditor. There are some issues that my horse and I have worked on that have been improved by watching the clinics. A friend of mine has the original groundwork DVD and I'm working my way through that.
    I haven't heard anything about him doing Pasadena again. Is he?
    A helmet saved my life.

    2014 goal: learn to ride like TheHorseProblem, er, a barn rat!



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