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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,467

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    Here in the broke Willamette Valley (OR), self-care is a common option and cheap $90-125 for a dry stall, perhaps with the BO doing one feeding so that the owner only needs to come out once a day.


    OP, the answer to your question can be found in your costing. How much income does each stall generate on your farm? That's your dry stall price.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    9,495

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    Dry stall in a racing barn here, $200.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    8,045

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    I pay $300/mo for a dry stall, provide everything and do my own mucking, bucket cleaning and filling, and PM feeding/retrieval. They feed am and turnout. I would bump your prices to $250 and offer her this deal, telling her that mucking the stall every 24 hours is required or she is out. Let her muck a double stall, clean and fill her own buckets, bag her feeds, put out her hay the night before in tubs, and chase after Dobbin every night, regardless of the weather. It builds character!
    Last edited by Chief2; Mar. 1, 2013 at 12:53 PM. Reason: changed a pronoun
    "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits." Albert Einstein

    http://s1098.photobucket.com/albums/...2011%20Photos/


    9 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2003
    Posts
    4,925

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    Now, it's been a decade since I last did self care but back then the going rate was $150 for a dry stall in a small barn (small indoor, OK turnout, lighted outdoor) plus $25/mo for shavings that they ordered in bulk. That included NO mucking or feeding.

    I paid $3 per feeding (so $6/day that I was not there) and $5 for a stall cleaning (though I did my own stall and often other people's so I rarely paid, we would trade)

    so my raw cost including feeding and assuming mucking 7 days a week, the cost back then would have been $505 assuming I had never fed and mucked my own horse. Counting in the mucking I did, board averaged out about $350.

    $200 isn't worth your time unless your barn is free to operate because even 1/2 hr a day paying yourself $8 an hour is $120 right there and doesn't include feeding, turning out, etc.

    Lady doesn't know what horses cost. I think my $450 full board with an indoor is a godsend, pricewise.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2006
    Posts
    1,242

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    Truthfully, I think I would just say "I'm sorry, I'm not prepared to offer anything but full board here". She will find something to complain about, you will not be happy with her work, she will need to go away and have you feed etc etc etc.....Nip it in the bud now and tell her how it is- or she is more than welcome to give her notice. Some people, if you give an inch, they will take a mile.
    And, what if she gets hurt cleaning the stall? It's a part of your deal, can she come back on your for that? Not worth it....
    Kerri



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2008
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    2,201

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    Once you open the door to partial care for some then things go downhill. I would tell her you are a full care facility only and if she can't afford to pay your going rate she needs to look elsewhere. She knows that if she skimps on hay and shavings that you will (most likely) fill in the gaps ( i would). I just see a mess waiting to happen.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2009
    Posts
    2,422

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    I'd just do the math. You charge X for board. She wants to provide shavings, feed, and hay. Those things cost you Y per month. X-Y + (10% pain in the butt fee) = what you should charge.

    Is she doesn't want to pay that she can move her horse to the less expensive facility.

    You use only her stuff for her horse. If you have to dip into yours the cost goes back up to full board. Not prorated for what she did provide.

    What do the farriers say? Charge her until you like her (or she leaves).



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2010
    Posts
    2,527

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    I pay $235 a month for a 12X12 stall with a large paddock attached. It's supposed to be a "modified" board where I buy all hay & grain and the barn turns out in the pasture every day, mucks the stall once a week (yes you read that right, ONCE a week!), provides a bag of shavings a week, and does all feeding/watering. However, since that is not up to my standard of care, I treat it like a part-board situation--I clean the stall/paddock every day, provide all my own hay, grain, & shavings, set up the next day's grain every night, stuff my horse's hay net full so they don't have to worry about hay, and dump/scrub/refill water buckets once a day. So, the barn worker just has to dump my horse's pre-made grain 2X/day and top off his water.

    I do think I'm paying too much, but I don't really have any other options (horse needs a stall w/attached paddock or he will weave like crazy). This is a place that has no arena (let alone lighting!), no round pen, etc., crappy footing, but is generally a nice place with a lot of potential but it just needs some work.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2005
    Location
    Va
    Posts
    3,668

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    $150/mo for dry stall. $6./day (min) for the work. She provides her own food.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2005
    Location
    Va
    Posts
    3,668

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    $150/mo for dry stall. $6./day (min) for the work. She provides her own food.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    16,684

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    Thanks for all the responses again. Long day doing my farrier appts...and have given this a lot of thought while on the road today. I think full board of $500 at this point, and I'm not going down this self care route...several of you have made some really good points and I do think that would open a can of worms I don't want. I just need to make it clear that the BS stops or she leaves because drama is not something I need as busy as I am.

    Chief...I LOVE you attitude. I do wish sometimes people like this lady would actually have to DO something every day 365 days a year in all weather and see how enthusiastic she is to pick up that pitchfork everyday and never have a true day off. My own horses live out in shelters and are so so so much easier to manage than full boarders. I'm getting too old for this stuff and have very little patience for BS the older I get.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    5,564

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    I have a big eating messy horse.

    I pay $375 a month for a paddock and hay twice a day.

    I do my own mucking, turning out, I buy my own bedding, grain, and an additional 220 pounds (two large bales) of hay a month.

    Back in 1988 – I rented a paddock for $60 a month (with inflation, that is $120 today). Nothing but the space as included, I did all feeding, mucking, turning out, and bought all feed and shavings.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2013
    Posts
    12

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    I didn't read everyone's responses, but here are my thoughts.

    First of all, I charge people board based on limited amounts of grain, hay, and bedding. If they want extra, I charge extra. My charge is for up to 1 full scoop (regardless of grain weight) of grain given twice a day, and 2-3 flakes of hay given twice per day. Horses are usually out 24/7 so they also graze all day and when grass is really good I don't even feed hay, because they don't want it. Also, if I had to remove my stall divider to give somebody an extra large stall.. I would charge them extra board. Maybe not quite double, but close to it. Even though it doesn't COST me double to give them a double stall, that is a space that I could have given a new boarder so I am losing money by giving away that extra stall. And btw, I have large horses myself and unless this is a Clydesdale or something, most large horses are fine in a 12x12 stall. Mine are all over 16 hands and one is over 17 hands. They are in 12x12 stalls. I'd love to have 14x14, but I don't.. and it's fine. I personally think it's too complicated to try and work out a deal where the boarder pays just for the stall and brings their own feed. Then you have to call them every time they are running low on feed, and they might not always bring it on time. I have one option for board, and that is all I offer. Take it or leave it!

    If I were you, I would tell this boarder if they think they can get better care somewhere else for cheaper, then go ahead and leave. Too much drama IMHO.



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2009
    Location
    Heart of Dixie
    Posts
    240

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daydream Believer View Post
    Thanks for all the responses again. Long day doing my farrier appts...and have given this a lot of thought while on the road today. I think full board of $500 at this point, and I'm not going down this self care route...several of you have made some really good points and I do think that would open a can of worms I don't want. I just need to make it clear that the BS stops or she leaves because drama is not something I need as busy as I am.

    Chief...I LOVE you attitude. I do wish sometimes people like this lady would actually have to DO something every day 365 days a year in all weather and see how enthusiastic she is to pick up that pitchfork everyday and never have a true day off. My own horses live out in shelters and are so so so much easier to manage than full boarders. I'm getting too old for this stuff and have very little patience for BS the older I get.

    Yes, this is the best way to go DDB. Besides, how was she going to get all that hay, and feed there? Pay a delivery fee? NOT.....Oh, in the trunk of her fancy new car.....or her friend from down the street...yup, that would go over well.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jan. 22, 2011
    Posts
    276

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    I self-board and all that gets me is a stall, a field and a place to put my stuff. I pay $160 a month, which I feel is pretty good. I would give her a price for the stall and than a daily stall cleaning fee (incliding some sawdust cost) and a fee for turning in and out. Or figure out how much you put out to feed the average horse and subtract that from the full board.



  16. #36
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2008
    Location
    south
    Posts
    619

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    Really, if you do the math, for your labor, at $200.00 per month you are working for about 6.55 a day, no room for ele. no insurance,fuel for the tractor to drag paddocks and the list can go on . Not really worth the BS. A friend of mine always says "Don't get mad add" $200.00 WAY not enough to make it worth the time or hassle.



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2009
    Posts
    6,998

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daydream Believer View Post
    Thanks for all the responses again. Long day doing my farrier appts...and have given this a lot of thought while on the road today. I think full board of $500 at this point, and I'm not going down this self care route...several of you have made some really good points and I do think that would open a can of worms I don't want. I just need to make it clear that the BS stops or she leaves because drama is not something I need as busy as I am.
    How much are your other boarders paying? in terms of "fairness" to all, if she is receiving extra stall space, then her board should be higher (obviously you can do anything you want in terms of board ) - from what you've described, I'd give her notice of an increase for May (having missed the Feb 28/April 1 opportunity); regardless of your initial agreement, you now realize that this horse IS consuming more time & feed & shavings etc than is covered by your normal board rate.
    Alternatively, she can continue at the $500 & subsidize his feed or stall maintenance (I suspect an additional $150 would actually make cleaning his stall quite tolerable).

    If she brings up the absurd dry stall fee again, just laugh, tell her that you've just waived her 30day notice & she can leave as soon as she is organized, then grab a piece of paper & make it official with both your signatures.



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    16,684

    Default

    Hey all,

    I haven't seen this boarder in two days but she had already been told $500 was the new board amount. The idea of her doing self board and a dry stall came after that sort of. I was just stunned at their idea that $125 was a great amount for a dry stall, stall cleaning and feeding...and why I wanted to hear what other folks are actually paying for services like that.

    I've pretty much made up my mind that this is our last change. If this doesn't work out, notice will be given and I'll go back to a much quieter easier barn.

    Thanks again for all the information and suggestions. You have all been very helpful and I feel a lot less like an ogre barn owner!



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2009
    Location
    Little Pond Farm
    Posts
    358

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    What shes forgetting is it isn't just a stall. Its pasture space., riding space, and storage space. I was told a good rule of thumb is to charge 10% of the spaces value. Example where I live land is expensive 25-30000. Per acre. My base price just to have a horse here is 250.00 then add care and labor. If ya cant make money boarding is it worth the trouble?. I asked a super sloppy high maintenance Tb and owner to leave when I realized I was being paid 7.00 a day to provide shelter, pasture, water feed and hay for her 2 horses. She paid me a decent amount of board but her horses were super hard keepers. I don't shovel anyones crap for free but my horses.



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    16,684

    Default

    I know casper...it's seriously true that none of that is free. I tried to explain what my electric bill runs, my liability insurance, overhead...etc...but I got a blank look because her friend, the self proclaimed expert in everything, was feeding her this $125 nonsense. Cripes you couldn't pay someone to do the labor at $125 to do the stall and basic care.



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