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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2006
    Location
    Colorado- Yee Haw!
    Posts
    2,815

    Default Barn doors in your house?

    Anyone have a sliding barn door in their house? I have seen some in magazines and think they look pretty cool and save space from a swinging door. Just curious if anyone has one and how they like it.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    8,395

    Default

    I've seen them in loft conversions, with the rustic or industrial look. Some of those had metal doors. I wonder about the weight of a big door like that. It seems like a better solution than the reframing a pocket door would need for installation.
    Last edited by JanM; Feb. 28, 2013 at 08:59 PM.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2010
    Location
    Earlysville, Virginia
    Posts
    3,248

    Default

    My friend just built a new house and had a barn door installed. It looks awesome and everyone who sees it loves it. I can link a picture from my fb if you want to see! (Yes, said friend is horsey).
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2011
    Location
    WNC
    Posts
    733

    Default

    I don't have one but two of my neighbors do... they're both in areas of the house that they don't need to be closed that often but can be when needed. In either case they look great whether open or closed. They both bought the actual barn door hardware that suspends the door from the top so I don't think door weight is a problem. Plus the authentic farm look... cute! I'd go for it if I had the right spot.
    It's just grass and water till it hits the ground.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,394

    Default

    we hung one on the wall as art, rather than as a sliding door.

    We used a french cleat type hanger that is very, very secure and distributes the weight across multiple studs.
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    14,147

    Default

    Our neighbours put one in their cottage as a closet door. Looked neat and appropriate for the area.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    14,147

    Default

    That is one lovely old barn and being restored by someone who knows what they are doing and not afraid of hard work - I love these reno photos - thanks.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2010
    Posts
    1,000

    Default

    i found several at an archetectural salvage place a few yrs ago........didn't know where to use them, but boy, i had to have them.........

    was able to use one when i had the screened in porched enclosed and then walled off into 2 rooms.......it hung right on the inside wall as the entry door to my shop..........then we converted the other half into quarters for my mom.........and was able to have another one done as a pocket door,since walls and insulation had to be installed to make the porch ok for yr round living.......so,knocked out a window into the main house and made it a handicapped accessable doorway, and hung the barn door as a pocket door there..........they look terriffic,even though not an airproof closure, but both are nside doors,so it's ok..........the only problem is being able to lock them.........without special hardware,they can only be "locked" from the inside ,with a rustic hook and eye........

    i LOVE them, and if i move, i may have to take them along!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    8,395

    Default

    TH-a good idea would be, before you put the house on the market you remove and replace the doors because you want to keep them. A realtor friend told me that if there's something you want to take with you, put it in the sales ad, and label it as 'not staying', then it's almost guaranteed that a buyer will see it, and want it included.

    I bet those doors look wonderful.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2012
    Posts
    1,301

    Default

    Do a search on Pinterest for this! - there are tons of beautiful examples in different rooms and settings- the one I saw today was a cover over a large- wide but shallow pantry shelving area of a kitchen wall.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    That is right. I swapped out our chandelier hours before we sold the house (sold in a day) and changed the sale ad to reflect the new Menard's-special. But I still had offers (we had 3 in one day) that included my coffee table and area rugs! I took it as a compliment.

    Any fixture stays, generally.

    ANYWAY, I LOVE the look of barn doors and there is some awesome hanging hardware you can use. Just go to Houz and search "barn door" if you want ideas. I tried so hard to figure out a way I could do it in our new house, but it just doesn't have the right wall configuration around the doors.

    My newest (probably ridiculous) dream is that I'm going to build some sort of wood barn-style door for the two car detached garage. It's going to serve as hay storage, but you see it when you look at the house.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,394

    Default

    Not ridiculous at all! It's a pretty simple structure to build. Heavy to hang, obviously, and getting it hung exactly level is really important.
    Learn from my mistake though: If you are doing two sliders that meet in the middle, rather than one huge heavy door) you need to do something to stabilize the doors against the wind when the doors are closed. (The wind will push them inward and can damage the hardware). You can have a track or guide rail that goes clear across the span, but you'll need to grade on either side it carefully to make sure you can drive over it and it's not a trip hazard. Or put a gate anchor on each door that drops into a hole (and just deal with the fact that you have to keep cleaning that tube out b/c it will get filled with hay, dirt,etc.)
    I didn't do this and I'm still mulling over the best solution (probably will be the latter, and I will put a mat over the receiver tube to keep it clean). For now, I have the very elegant solution of a cinderblock placed up against the doors when they're shut Tres classy.
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HungarianHippo View Post
    Not ridiculous at all! It's a pretty simple structure to build. Heavy to hang, obviously, and getting it hung exactly level is really important.
    Learn from my mistake though: If you are doing two sliders that meet in the middle, rather than one huge heavy door) you need to do something to stabilize the doors against the wind when the doors are closed. (The wind will push them inward and can damage the hardware). You can have a track or guide rail that goes clear across the span, but you'll need to grade on either side it carefully to make sure you can drive over it and it's not a trip hazard. Or put a gate anchor on each door that drops into a hole (and just deal with the fact that you have to keep cleaning that tube out b/c it will get filled with hay, dirt,etc.)
    I didn't do this and I'm still mulling over the best solution (probably will be the latter, and I will put a mat over the receiver tube to keep it clean). For now, I have the very elegant solution of a cinderblock placed up against the doors when they're shut Tres classy.
    They will have to swing. That's the part I have the mental roadblock with. The garage ends a couple feet past the garage door on either side. Not enough for a slider and I want it to stay a two car in case we move (resale).

    My BO had to put in a cement support to chain/anchor her giant arena sliders shut so the wind didn't grab the doors. They also locked--together in the middle when shut or on the sides when opened. They were lucky to catch the issue right away or they would have been destroyed.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2009
    Posts
    1,189

    Default

    There is a winery not too far from me that was made with all repurposed
    materials.

    There was an old barn on the property and they used as much as they could.

    They took all the big sliding barn doors and hung them in their big 'ballroom'
    to partition the area into smaller rooms. It's really cool.

    http://www.lauritawinery.com/about-the-winery.php

    I don't see any pictures of the inside, but this is the outside. It's a beautiful building.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    9,298

    Default

    http://www.obiebowman.com/p1weber.html
    I never had a big enough house to fit one of those, but we put in a custom pocket door that was pretty cute. Trust me, getting a barn door that looks like that one is just as much work as putting in a pocket door. You don't just screw a track on an existing wall and get something like that.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec. 23, 2009
    Posts
    31

    Default

    We put a small sliding door in the bathroom- was a great use of space to separate the toilet/shower from the vanity area! Hardware came from www.barndoorhardware.com and it didn't seem too hard to install.
    http://oakhillfarm.shutterfly.com


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2008
    Posts
    697

    Default

    I have 2 in my back hallway. One for the girl"s powder room and one for the boy"s urinal room. Used the hardware from barn door hardware. They look similar to lifeof reilly's



  18. #18
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2009
    Location
    Texas Hill Country
    Posts
    582

    Default

    Meh. I have a barn door leading from my bedroom to the bathroom. It wasn't by choice; a swinging door wouldn't fit. It is heavy and cumbersome compared to a regular door and I get tired of shoving it out of the way all the time. Also, it rattles ever-so-quietly but still-really-annoyingly against the doorjamb whenever the forced air heat comes on. Lazy architects and drunken contractors joined forces to create this barn door fiasco. Don't let it happen to you!
    Dreadful Acres: the chronicle of my extraordinary unsuitability to country life



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2013
    Location
    Southeastern US
    Posts
    1,499

    Default

    I'd be concerned about having big doors like that if I had either pets or children. It sounds neat for an adult household without indoor cats.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2000
    Location
    Full time in Delhi, NY!
    Posts
    6,394

    Default

    Saw these on one of the home shows and they made a big deal over the hardware/handle on the side of the door into the room it was in. But when they slid them open into the next room, I cringed waiting for the slam of the handle on the other side hitting the door frame. It didn't happen. As far as I could tell there was no way to open the door from the other room except palming it until you could get your fingers around the door edge.

    So if those of you who have these doors, can you tell me how you coped with this issue?
    ~Kryswyn~ Always look on the bright side of life, de doo, de doo de doo de doo
    Check out my Kryswyn JRTs on Facebook

    "Life is merrier with a terrier!"



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